Where Do You Start With Kitchens

Soldato
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Having never owned a house, only a flat before that we didn't do anything to kitchen, where do you start with a kitchen. Design, ideas, building work etc.

The entire room needs gutting, walls replastered/fixed, cabled and kitchen fitted.

Is it a matter of getting builders in first to fix all the issues or would it all come as part of design and fit. No idea in all honesty.

The previous owners look like they started to do something different as it has an island with power and plumbing.



 
Soldato
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I ripped the whole lot out, got the walls and ceiling plastered, fitted the units to my own plan and got a company in to fit the quartz worktop. I then wired in the new lighting and oven units while also fixing the mess of pipes that the original builder had hidden behind the old sink unit. Granted I did most of the work myself but you may need a joiner, plumber, plasterer and electrician.

If you have a garage, I would recommend getting your boiler moved into it to free up more space in the kitchen.
 
Soldato
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Thanks for the info. I don't have a garage sadly so not sure where the boiler could go. Would it be possible to move it to the entrance hallway next to/under the stairs where all the fuse boards/meters are too kr is that not safe? No idea haha but I really don't want it in the kitchen if I can. Noise and space reasons.
 
Soldato
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Do the walls need replastered or just skimmed?

any problems in the room that need fixing before installing a new kitchen?


I would contact a few kitchen places first, have them measure up or take your measurements in and get a few ideas for the floor plan and get quotes

once your floor plan is set in stone then get a copy from whomever you’re buying the kitchen from , rip out old kitchen and flooring , check your sub floor to see if it needs anything done to it, ie any repairs or levelling, get someone in to do the plumbing and electrics if stuff needs done before plastering or maybe the shop have their own contractors who can do it , then depending on your cabinet style It maybe easier to put the new floor in before the kitchen , it will cost more for the flooring but you’ll save on a bit of labour as the installer won’t have to keep cutting around units etc , after that get the kitchen fitted, most places will have fitters they contract to install the kitchen or you could hire your own but if you let the shop sort it then everything is their problem if things go wrong. you may need the electrician and plumber back to 2nd fix and install some appliances but that will depend on what the fitter is qualified to do.

I just had mine done not long ago and mine went like this (room was already stripped back to brick)

got floor plan
Lifted all the floor including subfloor, levelled the joists
Got 1st fix electric and plumbing , a lot of services run under the floor cavity
Re laid the subfloor
room boarded and skimmed
vinyl plank flooring installed
I then painted the ceiling to save hassle later on
Kitchen installed and cables / pipes positioned ready for 2nd fix
Worktops installed
2nd fix electrics and plumbing, appliances connected - kitchen now usable

next step which I need to do is fit the Skirting boards and finish painting but it’s not far off being finished



Things to bear in mind

Spend time planning your lighting , have a good idea of where all the lights should go, the kitchen designer should help but just remember it’s a pain to change some things once you’ve plastered and skimmed

If your having a kitchen diner make sure you position your sockets and think of where you may need some in the future if you decide to move things about

if you want an integrated fridge freezer I’d recommend 2 separate tall appliances as a single does not have much space

if you don’t use a microwave much but still need one you can have a cheapish stand-alone put above an oven in a tower unit

cupboards with shelves are generally cheaper than drawers so cutting down on the amount of drawers should be cheaper, don’t splash out on proper drawers or one of those vertical slide out things, for a full height larder unit , use the shelves and buy some basket pull outs - usually a lot cheaper and just as handy

some cupboards are essential for storing large appliances such as mixers , food processors etc

have a good idea where you want your radiators to go , it’s a pain to move them if you change your mind later
 
Soldato
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Thanks for the info. I don't have a garage sadly so not sure where the boiler could go. Would it be possible to move it to the entrance hallway next to/under the stairs where all the fuse boards/meters are too kr is that not safe? No idea haha but I really don't want it in the kitchen if I can. Noise and space reasons.

you need somewhere for it to vent so unless there’s access to an external wall that doesn’t affect your neighbour then that may be a no go
 
Soldato
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I would find a contactor who will take care of everything themselves. Arranging all the different trades yourself at different stages of the process can be a nightmare. It looks like you have a nice space there for a kitchen, going and getting some professional designs will help you a lot.
 
Associate
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I would find a contactor who will take care of everything themselves. Arranging all the different trades yourself at different stages of the process can be a nightmare.

This.
 
Soldato
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you need somewhere for it to vent so unless there’s access to an external wall that doesn’t affect your neighbour then that may be a no go

So in the 1st pic you can see where the boiler is. The entrance hallway is behind the wall where the boiler is. Where the boiler vent is now is the external wall and we are end of terrace so no neighbours to worry about. I don't think it's possible to do or it may cost too much or we move it and then the boiler breaks and we're stuffed haha It's 10 years old so we don't really wanna mess with it too much.

I will take more detailed pics later to show the extent of the possible work required for the walls. I don't think ceiling needs doing as it's been done and spotlight LEDs fitted and a wired smoke alarm. I just don't think they had any budget left to do the floors or kitchen itself.

We want to take the floor up in the kitchen and in the extension as both are laminated and both in bad condition. There is about a 1 inch drop between the original kitchen floor and the extended area. No idea what a sub floor is etc. I doubt we'd have budget for a lot of extra work. Looking around £7-£8k max for us here. We just want decent finish to walls/flooring and then as much kitchen as we can get.
 
Soldato
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Get one of your local kitchen designers in like Howdens or similar and get an idea of what is/isn't possible. I did my old kitchen albeit a bit smaller than yours, I think 14 units + Induction Hob, Dishwasher and 1 60cm Oven and 1 Microwave Combi Oven for under 6k all in. I fitted it myself and did all plumbing but had to get a sparky in to do the electrics for hob and oven which were all moved and required a new consumer unit. Depends how much you'd be confident in doing. If you have the space I'd recommend getting the pre built units from Wren or DIY Kitchens to save a big chunk of time and risk in messing things up :D
 
Soldato
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that don't look too bad to be fair.

previous owner started a project... put their place for sale...gave up and then now you've inherited the in-complete work.

It all depends on what your needs are but I would be tempted to ring some kitchen fitters and get them to come out and quote the work that you need doing.
Moving the boiler will cost an arm and a leg, but it looks like it could be covered up where it is. good luck.
 
Soldato
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that don't look too bad to be fair.

previous owner started a project... put their place for sale...gave up and then now you've inherited the in-complete work.

It all depends on what your needs are but I would be tempted to ring some kitchen fitters and get them to come out and quote the work that you need doing.
Moving the boiler will cost an arm and a leg, but it looks like it could be covered up where it is. good luck.

Yeah looks like they've painted the old cabinets then gave up. Looks like the central island is 2 sets of 18mm plywood stuck together.

I think you could easily renovate this and make it look nice, but if you're not doing any of the works budget of 7 to 8k might be difficult.

Id hazard a guess at:
Flooring : 1.5k
Kitchen 4.5k (depends on spec of course)
Plastering touch up around tiles : 250
Plumbing - tbc depending on whay you do
Electrics as above
Tiling - as about
Kitchen fitter - £1500
 
Soldato
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I would find a contactor who will take care of everything themselves. Arranging all the different trades yourself at different stages of the process can be a nightmare. It looks like you have a nice space there for a kitchen, going and getting some professional designs will help you a lot.

This is what I did, a good local specialist that takes care of everything Inc has, electrics, plastering, plumbing etc

Much less stressful than having to arrange yourself, all I had to do was strip 60 years of paint and paper off, other than that they did everything

It's bad enough not having a kitchen for two weeks can't imagine relying on multiple different tradesmen to turn up at different points
 
Soldato
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Birmingham
I’d try to find some local independent kitchen shops and get some quotes. They’ll know the trades and if they come recommended they won’t use rubbish workmen.

It’ll always be more expensive getting a single point of contact such as a kitchen shop (chain or independent) than sourcing each trade and supply yourself and acting as project manager.

You’re not planning any major building work, and even moving the boiler isn’t an enormous issue (as long as you have somewhere to put it), so anywhere that sells retail kitchens will be able to sort you out.

Lastly - good luck! It’s a royal pain in the arse getting a kitchen redone. Hopefully that’ll be a two week job!
 
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