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5820k where's it stand today?

Discussion in 'CPUs' started by bigjimmyauk, Dec 1, 2019.

  1. bigjimmyauk

    Soldato

    Joined: Nov 23, 2009

    Posts: 5,868

    Location: North Leicestershire

    I'm not a regular here like I used to be but where does the 5820k stand at 4.4Ghz compared to current gen stuff.

    Would I noticed any gains upgrading to current gen or am I still limited by my GPU at this point. Must say it's been a rock solid system. Gaming at 1440p on the monitor but sometimes do 4k gaming on the TV if it's a game I can use a controller for.
     
  2. McGraw

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Jan 16, 2006

    Posts: 2,107

    I'm on a 4790k and holding out until closer to PS5 release so I've got something new for Flight Simulator and Cyberpunk.

    You're fine with the 5820k IMO for a while yet.

    I was looking at the 3800x but it's not much faster than mine on single core.

    Might even just get a new GPU and wait for DDR5.
     
  3. Rroff

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Oct 13, 2006

    Posts: 64,509

    Off the top of my head trades blows clock for clock with the Ryzen 2600 - bit better for some stuff a little worse in others but uses a bit more power than the Ryzen.

    Won't see a huge gain upgrading unless you spend a lot of time on stuff that benefits from additional cores/threads.
     
  4. JediFragger

    Capodecina

    Joined: Oct 18, 2002

    Posts: 21,346

    Location: y0 Momma's a$$

    Wait til the next gen comes out for sure, the next Zen iteration looks like it could be a tasty upgrade and should be out in 8/9 months with a little luck.
     
  5. bakes0310

    Capodecina

    Joined: Oct 22, 2004

    Posts: 12,184

    I used to upgrade too often with CPUs and not get much performance increases. I see benchmarks and I see no reason to upgrade from a gaming perspective with a resolution higher that 1080p might aswell save the cash for when Nvidia brings out the 3000 series cards.
     
  6. Radox-0

    Mobster

    Joined: Mar 9, 2015

    Posts: 2,779

    Location: Earth

    Its a solid CPU. You can actually check if for your use case its a limit to overall performance. Monitor CPU and GPU usage during your typical gaming sessions. If your sitting there with CPU maxed out and GPU not so much and not achieving your target framerate, then sure a CPU upgrade can help. At 1440p and 4k generally the limit is the GPU, more so the latter.

    From when I had my 5960x paired with a 1080Ti, it was a solid combo and usually I was GPU pegged at 3440 x 1440 usually, or could increase visual quality settings to make it so.
     
  7. Minstadave

    Capodecina

    Joined: Jan 8, 2004

    Posts: 24,914

    Location: Rutland

    I moved from a 5820K to a 3700X.

    Gaming wise there are some gains to be had, particularly minimum frame rates being higher, especially once you overclock the RAM and IF on the AMD chip.

    Productivity was a big improvement, better single core performance and 2 extra cores made a real difference.

    Biggest difference was with noise. My overclocked 5820 was probably near 200W at load, the 3700X is 65W.
     
  8. koooowweeee

    Mobster

    Joined: Jan 13, 2010

    Posts: 4,829

    Location: Manchester

    You could sell it and get a 5690x that's what I did. Sell your 5820k and it's a pretty cheap upgrade
     
  9. ~>Dg<~

    Caporegime

    Joined: Jun 1, 2006

    Posts: 31,733

    Location: Notts

    keep it for another year then reaccess. anything amd is a side step gaming wise. i have one overclocked at 4.5 still and nothing really troubles it. upgrade when you will notice it or have issues.
     
  10. Journey

    Soldato

    Joined: Oct 18, 2002

    Posts: 6,522

    Location: West Midlands

    Obviously the IPC is significantly lower than the current generation products from either CPU vendor, and if you are running Windows and are patched up to date you'll have lost significant performance due to all of the mitigation put in place for the vunrabilities .

    All that being said if you are running an older GPU and are seeing acceptable frames rates, particularly at the low end then do you really need to change?

    So, do you find your system lacking at all? :)
     
  11. HangTime

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Oct 25, 2002

    Posts: 27,589

    Location: Hampshire

    I would keep hold of it, 6c/12t is still competitive and at 4.4ghz it won't be too far behind modern parts in the resolutions you mention. The problem with an upgrade is you'll be paying for a mobo as well and to get any sort of meaningful improvement you are probably looking at spending £400+ as you will need 3700x at a minimum.

    Over the past 10 years or so I've typically come away from cpu upgrades feeling a bit underwhelmed and tinged with regret that I've basically just upgraded to scratch an itch or because it seemed like there was a good deal available. With monitors now being higher resolution / refresh rate the is a heavy emphasis on GPU power. I don't think I would upgrade any hex-core cpu for gaming at 1440p and above.
     
  12. NinjaCool

    Hitman

    Joined: Mar 27, 2010

    Posts: 537

    Location: Denmark

    If the games still runs nicely I would just stay with what you have for now and instead look at the next generation such as the Ryzen 4000 (7nm+) coming out in mid/late 2020.
    If not, then since you are using 6c/12t I would at least upgrade into a 8c/16t CPU such as the 3700x together with a PCIe4 equipped motherboard like the Gigabyte X570 Aorus Elite.
     
  13. Avalon

    Soldato

    Joined: Dec 29, 2002

    Posts: 5,008

    Significant is debatable. IPC has barely changed in any meaningful way since Haswell, Broadwell went to 14nm, but was a non event in performance terms, everything since has been a rehash of the same hardware with next to no actual improvement in IPC. Software mitigation is going to be the same across most of the range, though later generations did some of it in hardware, they still took a performance hit. The only significant changes were in hardware instruction set support and potentially iGPU as the HEDT range didn’t have it (rebadged Xeon’s), if your workload benefits from something like that, then you could see a meaningful advantage in upgrading, if not then it’s largely pointless. For example moving from a 5820k/6800k to a 8600 is a side grade in performance terms, but my Plex box now does most of its transcoding for remote clients via iGPU leaving the CPU free for other tasks.
     
  14. Phil2008

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Dec 17, 2004

    Posts: 8,049

    I upgrade when things are really struggling and then its a wow factor when you buy your nice shiny new hardware.

    With the 5820k having 6c 12t, I guess its more or less as fast as my 8086k?
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2019 at 2:47 PM
  15. humbug

    Caporegime

    Joined: Mar 17, 2012

    Posts: 31,656

    If you don't have any frame pacing or outright stutter issues and you're not bottlenecking the GPU stick with it, its some way behind new Intel / AMD stuff now but if its not causing you any issues and you have no desire to upgrade because "reasons" why bother? Keep it until it becomes a problem.
     
  16. bimbleuk

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Sep 10, 2009

    Posts: 1,681

    Location: Gloucestershire

    I have no issues when gaming currently with a 1080 Ti @ UW 1440 resolutions and my CPU is barely above 25% for most games. I was hoping for a nice 3700X OCUK bundle this year over the weekend BF sales but gaining 10 to 20 fps at most wasn't really worth the upgrade. I was quite interested in new hardware to play with but I'm going to wait another year now or a stand out CPU/GPU release in between.

    I was still playing on my x99/980 Ti 2nd PC up till recently and that was still a very capable PC at 2560 x 1440 so that's now replaced my brothers i5-3570K + HD5870 gaming system
     
  17. HangTime

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Oct 25, 2002

    Posts: 27,589

    Location: Hampshire

    Basically the checklist for cpu upgrade in relation to gaming is:
    • Is it lacking in cores (fewer than six)? No.
    • Does it have a low IPC*Clockspeed? No, not at 4.4ghz.
    • Do you play at a very low resolution compared to GPU strength? No.
    • Do I need a mobo upgrade anyway to get other more modern features I want? Doubtful.
    • Is there something massively faster available at a sensible budget? No.
    Unless you're ticking multiple boxes on that list it probably isn't worth it.
     
  18. humbug

    Caporegime

    Joined: Mar 17, 2012

    Posts: 31,656

    Are they DDR4 or 3?
     
  19. Avalon

    Soldato

    Joined: Dec 29, 2002

    Posts: 5,008

    DDR4 - all x99 (LGA2011-3 so V3/V4 Xeon class) was, x79 was DDR3 (LGA2011 V1/V2 Xeon).
     
  20. Phil2008

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Dec 17, 2004

    Posts: 8,049

    I dont see the point spending money on a new pc if your not going to see much of a difference accept in benchmarking.. To me that's like setting fire to your hard earned money.