Composite sheds like Keter?

Soldato
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This may or may not be relevant but a few years ago I had a big Keter storage box that I kept bikes in and padlocked when it was closed up. One day the key broke off in the padlock. I don’t know what peed me off more - the fact the key broke in the padlock of the fact it took me 30 seconds to hacksaw off the security clasp and get into the box. Plastic doesn’t make for secure storage
 
Man of Honour
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Plastic doesn’t make for secure storage
Wood doesn't either. My neighbour has a big fancy wood shed that cost over £2k, nice thick wood and solidly built. He keeps his new BMW motorbike in it and has a dirty great padlock on it. The problem is that anybody could open that shed in 30 seconds or less because the hinges have normal screws holding them on plus they are external. All you would need is a Phillips screwdriver and the doors are off!!

He really should have a steel bikeshed for his bike preferably with a alarm too.
 
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Soldato
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The problem is that anybody could open that shed in 30 seconds or less because the hinges have normal screws holding them on plus they are external. All you would need is a Phillips screwdriver and the doors are off!!

Advice that I was given from the Police is that nails should be used to attach hinges and hasps. A few years ago there was a spate of burglaries on sheds where hinges were simply unscrewed just as you describe. It's a definite issue
 
Soldato
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Advice that I was given from the Police is that nails should be used to attach hinges and hasps. A few years ago there was a spate of burglaries on sheds where hinges were simply unscrewed just as you describe. It's a definite issue
Let's be honest, if a thief wants something a few nails aren't going to keep them out. A quick bit of leverage with a crowbar and they'll be straight into a shed regardless of whether it's made of plastic or wood.
 
Soldato
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Advice that I was given from the Police is that nails should be used to attach hinges and hasps. A few years ago there was a spate of burglaries on sheds where hinges were simply unscrewed just as you describe. It's a definite issue

This may or may not be relevant but a few years ago I had a big Keter storage box that I kept bikes in and padlocked when it was closed up. One day the key broke off in the padlock. I don’t know what peed me off more - the fact the key broke in the padlock of the fact it took me 30 seconds to hacksaw off the security clasp and get into the box. Plastic doesn’t make for secure storage

Wood doesn't either. My neighbour has a big fancy wood shed that cost over £2k, nice thick wood and solidly built. He keeps his new BMW motorbike in it and has a dirty great padlock on it. The problem is that anybody could open that shed in 30 seconds or less because the hinges have normal screws holding them on plus they are external. All you would need is a Phillips screwdriver and the doors are off!!

He really should have a steel bikeshed for his bike preferably with a alarm too.

This is the probably the main reason to get the Asgard over the composite. You aren’t getting into it nearly as quick and you’ll certainly make way more noise.

The nails won’t help either, you’d get even a basic flat headed screwdriver in and use it to leaver the nails out. Probably be better to use no left turn screws, you can’t get them out.
 
Associate
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I had a Keter shed at my previous house. Virtually no maintenance but can be a bit of a ballache if something breaks on them. During strong wind a few years back one of the doors blew open and snapped off a hinge. I managed to repair it with some scrap metal but unlike wood it's difficult to securely attach anything to them using screws or nails.
 
Associate
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Advice that I was given from the Police is that nails should be used to attach hinges and hasps. A few years ago there was a spate of burglaries on sheds where hinges were simply unscrewed just as you describe. It's a definite issue

The best solution to external hinge removal is some form of hinge bolt or if the frame isn't suitable then several small metals plates (3 to 5mm from TS/SF etc) across the door upright that overlap the shed frame when closed. Shed door bolts / hasp usually come with part coach bolt fittings so they're pretty secure and I normally make them all that type. I do this to all my sheds as well as board out internally (primarily for shelves, tools etc) so they're double walled and in my case linked to my home alarm for good measure.

A shed will never be that secure but its easy to make them safe from a quick screwdriver/crowbar attack without much cost.
 
Associate
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The nails won’t help either, you’d get even a basic flat headed screwdriver in and use it to leaver the nails out. Probably be better to use no left turn screws, you can’t get them out.

As above, coach bolts are the best approach for hinges & hasps, but if they want in, they'll get in. Through the roof sometimes, which often isn't very well secured to the frame.

Edit: I recently bought a Keter Signature storage box. The fake wood is better than many boxes I've seen but it still looks like plastic, and it's not as good an imitation as the garden furniture we've got which wasn't very expensive.
 
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