1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Help: ITX Mobo, CPU and Memory upgrade - Socket 1155 to latest type

Discussion in 'Small Form Factor and Single Board Computers' started by Kermit, Mar 25, 2019.

  1. Kermit

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Oct 27, 2002

    Posts: 2,345

    Location: UK

    I'm thinking to replace my ITX, CPU and memory with a mobo that supports M2 SSD with >6GB/sec speed - I think thats a Ultra M2?

    Current specs are i7-3770, Gigabyte GA-H77-WIFI mobo, Geforce GTX960 with2x 8GB of Corsair XMS3

    I don't really play games much so don't need much more power (if any) than I have atm (I actually throttle my cpu to 80% max in Win10 power management :p) so I'd like it to run quietly but not sure if Intel is still the way go or if cheaper AMD's are better on heat these days and a bit more bang for your money given I won't be overclocking. Its safe to say this upgrade will be 90% for an M2 slot an improvement in load times compared to my 2.5" 250GB Samsung SSD (Win10+Progs) + 1TB SSD I use for Data that I'll keep

    Ideally <£150/160 on the CPU or ~£100 if I can get same power as current i7-3370 which is socket 1155 and therefore as far as I can tell there's no ITX boards available for that socket CPU with an M2 slot as otherwise I'd be happy to keep CPU/Memory.
    Mobo I'd like a nice stable one but not overly fancy but solid state caps useful for longevity ~£100-120
    Memory needn't be fancy as space likley a premium with ram slots close to the CPU/cooler so not much in the way of cooling fins. Corsair XMS2 then XMS3 memory has always worked well for me but don't think they do XMS4?

    so can anyone help

    a) is it worth upgrading for M2?
    b) Intel or Amd?
    c) Recomend a CPU thats cool running, 4+ Cores and I guess min. 3.2Ghz & a ITX mobo to go with it?
     
  2. tamzzy

    Capodecina

    Joined: May 26, 2012

    Posts: 11,180

    Lol. Unless you're doing stuff like video editing or same-drive file copying, then nvme doesn't actually yield much real world improvements in comparison to a good SATA 3 SSD.
    In synthetic benchmarks, yes. Real world no.
     
  3. Gary*

    Hitman

    Joined: Sep 11, 2009

    Posts: 758

    Location: Suffolk

    I have pretty much the same setup as you and have contemplated that upgrade a few times but after looking at benchmarks etc, I really don't think the cost is justifiable.
     
  4. Kermit

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Oct 27, 2002

    Posts: 2,345

    Location: UK

    Thanks both, I guess your right and I'd be upgrading for little gain. I guess I'll wait another year or so till the latest Windows 10 demands >1000MB/sec transfer speeds.
     
  5. Emlyn_Dewar

    Capodecina

    Joined: Oct 15, 2003

    Posts: 12,624

    Location: Chengdu

    For your use it would be a waste of cash. Better to hold on to the budget until you absolutely need an upgrade.
    I recently moved my i5 i8400 into an ITX board and moved to m2 storage over SATA3 SSD. I barely notice any difference for day to day usability.
    Definitely boots faster but talking seconds.
     
  6. Kermit

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Oct 27, 2002

    Posts: 2,345

    Location: UK

    Resistance was futile and on the spur of the moment over just before xmas knowing I wasn't getting much (I didn't ask for much) I decided I had to upgrade :D

    I bought this lot to replace my existing Intel i7-3770, Gigabyte H77 ITX mobo, 2x8GB Corsair XMS3 DDR3 & my boot drive which was a Samsung 840 EVO 250GB SSD

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Took about 2 hours start to finish including getting the air duster and cotton buds out to give everything a good clean but excluding Windows activation/driver installs

    Case removed
    [​IMG]

    Graphics card removed exposing main motherboard
    [​IMG]

    My ITX power supply
    [​IMG]

    Old motherboard, cpu and memory lifted out. I've stuck these on ebay with £1 FVF separately and now all sold
    [​IMG]

    Empty case after a good clean
    [​IMG]

    Fitting the Samsung M2 SSD drive in the boards M2 slot. I like that it has an integrated heatsink to keep it cool
    [​IMG]

    CPU and memory in place
    [​IMG]

    CPU Cooler fitted
    [​IMG]

    This is something I wasn't aware off being out of the loop a bit but didn't realise new motherboards now have RGB connectors for controlling LEDS either in the case (I don't have these) but the included AMD CPU cooler has LED lighting and plugging this cable in allows me to set either in BIOS or Windows Utility how I want the LED, it can colour cycle, pulse, random etc different colours. I've just opted for a steady Blue LED effect as mostly my case is closed and not really bothered with LED stuff but its kinda off a quite cool new thing if your into lighting up your PC with LEDs
    [​IMG]

    Motherboard in place
    [​IMG]

    Connecting up the cables, the worst part particularly the small wires for power switch, reset, power led & HD Led

    On the plus side, as I now only have a single 2.5" SSD drive, I could remove a small cage below the DVD drive that held the two drives as there's still a small space for a single 2.5" SSD and that gives a bit t of extra room in the small case
    [​IMG]

    First boot. I've temporarily hooked up my old 250GB SSD drive which is now replaced by the M2 SSD in order to boot to Windows, get drivers installed then I used Macrium reflect to image the 2.5" SSD to the M2 SSD, shutdown and removed this drive as it now boots on M2 drive
    [​IMG]

    First boot...took a few minutes then I did have to use the Gigabtye drivers CD to install the network card driver as without that Windows 10 couldn't get on the internet to get the other drivers
    [​IMG]

    Last pic before putting the case back on with my preferred static blue LED effect on the cooler
    [​IMG]

    the new M2 SSD performance. In the real world use, it doesn't actually feel any quicker in use than the old 2.5" Sata SSD but makes for impressive figures to screenshot
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2020
  7. Kermit

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Oct 27, 2002

    Posts: 2,345

    Location: UK

    New CPU CPUz benchmark score/info

    [​IMG]

    New CPU compared to my old one (Intel i7-3770) and the top ranking CPUs available (I've cropped a lot of the in between CPU's off this list)
    [​IMG]

    and despite not really noticing much difference with day to day normal use as I rarely play games except one 10 year old game, I don't think I did too bad with this upgrade given my old parts are now all sold on ebay (prices excl the postage) as per the prices below

    i7-3770 CPU £80
    Gigabyte Motherboard £77.50
    16GB DDR3 Memory £46
    Samsung 250GB SSD £33
    Borderlands 3 Game £27.50
    (part of Ryzen CPU promo, I got the code by verifying my new CPU installed online but as I'm not interested in the game, I sold the code on ebay)

    Total £264 minus £4 ebay fees as I listed during ebays regular £1 max final value fee days minus about 3% paypal fees

    Total cost of upgrade £371 - £264 = £107 plus £6 or £7 pp fees. Feeling better now that this was a cost effective upgrade :D
     
  8. Gary*

    Hitman

    Joined: Sep 11, 2009

    Posts: 758

    Location: Suffolk

    Not bad at all Kermit - are you seeing any performance increase in games?
     
  9. Kermit

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Oct 27, 2002

    Posts: 2,345

    Location: UK

    Thanks, I barely play any games only Enemy Territory (the original) but I already had that capped at a rock solid 120fps in 1080p so no gains there. I did however fire up F1 2017 which my son plays from time to time and ran it does seem able to run it own benchmark perhaps 20fps faster (60-70fps) with the details level turned up a bit.
     
  10. Wegason

    Gangster

    Joined: Feb 27, 2011

    Posts: 197

    Location: Essex

    Paying only £107 to upgrade from four cores to eight cores while also going from DDR 3 to DDR 4 and to an NVME SSD is pretty good going!