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How difficult is it to install - Laminate flooring

Discussion in 'Home and Garden' started by Bounce, Jun 26, 2020.

  1. Bounce

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Dec 22, 2011

    Posts: 1,421

    Location: Stoke-on-Trent

    Looking to install laminate flooring into 3 rooms. Overall measurement is 50m2 in total.

    How difficult is it to install ? bearing in mind I'm a novice for DIY and are is there any recommended suppliers/manufacturers to purchase the flooring from?
     
  2. Maccapacca

    Tea

    Joined: Apr 13, 2010

    Posts: 16,847

    Location: Sunny Sussex

    What’s your budget?

    Why laminate or do you just mean clicklok flooring?

    Are you taking skirtings off? I think as a diy I’d rather take them off and reinstall, it’s much easier fitting skirting than trying to scribe flooring.

    Good quality flooring is easier to install.

    Boen
    Havwoods
     
  3. Bounce

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Dec 22, 2011

    Posts: 1,421

    Location: Stoke-on-Trent

    Yes Clicklok flooring, I don't have any budget in mind just looking at the options.

    I don't have any experience in this so looking for advice.

    edit : I wasn't planning on taking the skirtings off, but if I did I assume I'd have to buy new skirtings?
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2020
  4. Maccapacca

    Tea

    Joined: Apr 13, 2010

    Posts: 16,847

    Location: Sunny Sussex

  5. Bounce

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Dec 22, 2011

    Posts: 1,421

    Location: Stoke-on-Trent

  6. Maccapacca

    Tea

    Joined: Apr 13, 2010

    Posts: 16,847

    Location: Sunny Sussex

    Sonic gold underlay will need to be bought yes unless it’s upstairs then an acoustic underlay like regupol
     
  7. Shady45

    Gangster

    Joined: Jun 10, 2012

    Posts: 232

    I used wickes laminate. Decent enough and reasonable price.

    As far as how difficult it will be... Will depend on a few things. How square the room is, how straight the walls are, how level the floor is, how many doorways, how many things to cut around. Skirting board the same... Might need to do a bit of plaster work depending on how the skirting comes off - but it won't need to look pretty.

    Generally it's a very doable diy job, but will have varying difficulty!
     
  8. b0rn2sk8

    Soldato

    Joined: Mar 9, 2003

    Posts: 5,802

    I would say its a medium difficulty job but very DIYable for a novice. The tricky parts are doors and transitions to other rooms but take your time, plan your layout and you'll get a good finish.

    You'll need to take the skirting board off as others have said, but that's a fairly simple task to refit and finish. You *can* leave it on but it means you need to add some scotia trim around the room which looks naff. Just because you can, doesn't mean you should.

    Watch a few you tube tutorials and you'll see how its done. You'll need a few basic tools but nothing expensive.
     
  9. WoodyUK

    Soldato

    Joined: Dec 29, 2009

    Posts: 6,396

    Location: Warwickshire

    "Contour Gauge Duplicator Profile Measuring Tool" or "Profile Gauge" will be very useful for this. Wouldn't recommend doing it without one if you want a nice finish at the edges.
     
  10. ANDARIAL

    Soldato

    Joined: Oct 19, 2002

    Posts: 6,271

    Location: Woolyback Country

    Re `pre finished skirting`
    I personally do not like this stuff
    I find that it never fits well at mitres on corners or any mitred joints in a length
    Just my experience but if you do decide to replace consider `ordinary`unpainted skirting and prime/undercoat then fit/sand/fill where necessary and finish gloss

    Just my 2p worth :)
     
  11. 200sols

    Mobster

    Joined: Jan 14, 2018

    Posts: 4,414

    Location: Hampshire

    Its easy to lay until you come to a door and that is really the only place a newbie will struggle. Take skirting off its a far better finish that way, cut out door frames and architraves so the flooring slides underneath. When it comes to fitting skirting you need a mitre saw and a coping saw if fitting new, its fairly easy stuff though.
     
  12. mOdO

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Jun 13, 2007

    Posts: 1,138

    Location: London

    I'm a novice and did my downstairs toilet and it was straight forward. Cutting around the toilet and door frame was the tricky part. Just make sure you have the tools and buy extra flooring as you will make mistakes. I used b&q and it was fine.

    Scotia if you don't want to remove the skirting. But I agree, doesn't look as clean.
     
  13. 200sols

    Mobster

    Joined: Jan 14, 2018

    Posts: 4,414

    Location: Hampshire

    You should have removed the toilet first :eek:
     
  14. b0rn2sk8

    Soldato

    Joined: Mar 9, 2003

    Posts: 5,802

    Was just going to say this, it’s actually easier to remove the toilet than it is to cut round.

    They are only normally held in by 2 screws in the floor and 2 in the wall. The waste pipe just slides off and the water should have a valve to turn off and unscrew.

    You don’t even need a mitre saw, a basic general purpose handsaw will do the straight cuts.

    A coping saw will do any curves or a jigsaw with the appropriate blade will also be suitable to do the curves and straight cuts.
     
  15. moon man

    Mobster

    Joined: Nov 17, 2003

    Posts: 3,022

    Location: St Breward Cornwall

    I am terrible at diy but have done 3 admittedly easily shaped rooms ,its pretty easy with the click stuff ,this white laminate is from homebase ,its amazingly stain repellent and hard wearing and brings light to the rooms
    i must admit i use the beading around the edge to cover my less than perfect gaps ,but once you start laying it in the long runs its so quick

    [​IMG]
     
  16. jsmoke

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Jun 17, 2012

    Posts: 9,114

    I did s small bathroom, as said it's just the corners and edges. You can easily screw it up but if you take your time and have a worked out system in place then it's doable. The pros will do it well though.
     
  17. mOdO

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Jun 13, 2007

    Posts: 1,138

    Location: London

    Sounds easy as you say that. I just didn't want the faff of removing it. But looking back I should have done it.
     
  18. Maccapacca

    Tea

    Joined: Apr 13, 2010

    Posts: 16,847

    Location: Sunny Sussex

    Yes it’s not quite as straightforward removing the toilet, everything ends up being 18mm higher and you might need to adjust the waste, raise the cistern and cold feed.
     
  19. Jez

    Caporegime

    Joined: Oct 18, 2002

    Posts: 32,290

    Kudos to anyone able to accurately cut around a toilet and not have it look awful! I’d never manage that and would always remove and Deal with it being slightly higher.
     
  20. m4rmite

    Gangster

    Joined: Oct 26, 2007

    Posts: 333

    Get knee pads before you start!

    Or is it just me who feels like 90 years old after 10 minutes on my knees?

    +1 for the profile gauges for going round shaped edges.