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Motorbike Advice

Discussion in 'Biker's Cafe' started by Stratos, Feb 14, 2010.

  1. Stratos

    Hitman

    Joined: Jan 6, 2005

    Posts: 545

    Location: Portsmouth

    I have been driving for 3 years now and want to get a motorbike. Being 22 i can go for a full licence. Now would you think its best if i do my CBT and get to grips with a 125cc to start with rather then going in at the deep end. I have also being reading about people who restrict larger bikes say a 400cc to a 125cc is this a good idea?
     
  2. Fireskull

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Oct 31, 2006

    Posts: 9,657

    Location: Eastleigh / Winchester

    You have to do CBT regardless, so my advice is always do CBT and see if you like it first, then yes if you do go to Direct Access route so you can ride any bike.
     
  3. Terrier_Jimlad

    Mobster

    Joined: Nov 4, 2006

    Posts: 2,658

    Location: Yorkshire

    My advice to you would be to get your CBT done alongside your DAS. You'll end up doing your DAS on something like an CB500 or similar, but once it's done its done and you can forget about it. Where you go from there is your choice, you can either start off on a 125, and go the 2stroke route (RS125 / Cagiva Mito) if you're a dab hand with mechanics, or go the reliable 4t route (CBR125 / R125 / NSR etc etc)

    Or, if you like the extra power from your experience on the 500 you do your DAS on, then you could always jump on something like a Bandit 600, not enough power to do silly speeds (150+) but enough for you to get to grips with and believe me, you can have plenty of fun on a Bandit

    People on restrict larger bikes down to 33bhp if they have only done the restricted test, called A2, it means they can only ride machines up to 33bhp for 2 years from the date of passing, but after that they can ride what they want. So basically they can legally go ride a zzr1400 or busa at only 19 yrs old, which imo is crazy but hey ho
     
  4. bakes0310

    Capodecina

    Joined: Oct 22, 2004

    Posts: 12,435

    Im 24, from october to last week i done all the test's thats the CBT, A1 and direct access. I now have a full license to ride whatever size bike i want. After my CBT i bought a 125cc to help me get road experience for my road test (direct access) which really did help. Two hours after passing my road test with my full license being made i went down town and bought my dream 600cc bike. The point im getting at is dont mess around and get your direct Access done like me and in a few months you will be where i am....an extremely happy person:D
     
  5. End Creditz

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Apr 8, 2003

    Posts: 1,044

    Location: NFA

    Definitely get to grips with a 125 first. Get as much experience under your belt as you can because as I'm sure you're well aware a mistake on a bike even at low speed can be very unpleasant as you won't have a big metal box protecting you.
    I wouldn't jump to a sports bike straight after you pass either, lost 2 of my friends who did went that route and both within a week, one within 2 days, of getting their dream bikes.
    I love biking even with the damage I've witnessed my friends taking, and myself. Personal injury toll includes 1 smashed knee, 2 broken wrists, 1 broken rib, 1 dislocated hip, 1 broken neck (2 vertabra cracked and a bruised spinal chord). All of which I'm now paying for 18yrs after getting the injuries. I'd love another bike even if I am the only 1 out of the 6 friends I used to ride with still able to walk, hobble, and breath. Oh and if you're wondering I collected the majority of those injuries on 100cc bike and have never dropped or been knocked off a proper bike.

    Bikes rock but you need to learn to respect them before you can really abuse them properly ;) Have fun!


    Edit: You'll be a better car driver for the upgrade in situational awareness riding a bike gives you (amazing how much more attention you pay when you're lifes on the line most of the time!)
     
  6. Stratos

    Hitman

    Joined: Jan 6, 2005

    Posts: 545

    Location: Portsmouth

    so is there any point in getting say a 400cc and get it restricted to a 125cc to learn on, to get used to the size of the bike etc.
     
  7. PardonTheWait

    Capodecina

    Joined: Aug 26, 2003

    Posts: 24,010

    You can't restrict a 400cc to a 125cc. If you're on L Plates it HAS to be a 125cc bike. If you take the restricted full test (pointless at your age - it's the same test as the full full one, just on a slower bike), then you could restrict a 400 to the appropriate power and ride that for two years. A lot of 400s fall under the limit anyway though.

    I was in your shoes at the same age (well I didn't have a car license either) and I did a week long course, I'd definitely recommend it to anyone else. Because it's concentrated down you learn quickly and get loads of practice and I found it all stuck. I think I did a four day but they do three and five day ones as well. They recommended five for people who'd never ridden, four for people who've ridden bikes but not on the road, or had scooters and such, and three for people who were very confidnent or had oodles of bike experience already from racing or MX or whatever.

    We did the CBT, then a day on 125s learning, then a day on 500s, then half a day on 500s and the test and I found it just about right really, progression wise.
     
  8. helpimcrap

    Capodecina

    Joined: Jan 13, 2004

    Posts: 12,401

    Location: Leicestershire

    Bike riding is similar to kids in powerful cars. A modern 600cc sportsbike will do 0-60 in 3s and top 60mph easily enough - something most cars struggle with.

    With this in mind (and i cannot talk about being sensible i admit) you only go as quick as the right hand allows. you are in control and someone would knock you off regardless of the situation and the bike.

    You are the one who makes the choices and if you're sensible then yes go for it. if not then no.
     
  9. Luke

    Soldato

    Joined: Jul 19, 2005

    Posts: 6,938

    Location: S. Yorkshire

    Guessing you meant 160?:p

    But the post echoes my thoughts really.
    My route post-DAS was 500cc, 650cc, 1000cc and currently 1100cc.
    There really is no problem going from DAS to a 600 as long as you control the bike rather than let it control you.
     
  10. Freefaller

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Jun 5, 2003

    Posts: 86,989

    Location: Falling...

    I did my CBT then rode for about 1 week. Within 1hr of "passing" I knew I wanted a proper bike licence. In fact ever since I was a kid I wanted a bike licence but never would have been able to do so until I moved out. So I moved out, and many years on I'm still loving being on 2 wheels! :D
     
  11. Ghosteh

    Mobster

    Joined: Mar 18, 2006

    Posts: 4,144

    Location: Liverpool

    As others have said, go straight for a DAS, much much better than being stuck with a 125 when you know you can have bigger. I actually did my CBT when I was 20, a week before turning 21, then 2 days after my birthday, I did the DAS course, and haven't looked back. I had originally wanted to get my A2 licence done when I was mid 20's but decided to wait 6 months, and I'm very happy I did.
    Went out and bought a Bandit 650 about 3 days after passing my test(which actually took me two goes :p. Target fixation on the U-Turn part of the test, not good lol) and have rode since then, though all weathers, best thing ever :D.

    Currently riding a GSX-R750 and it's fantastic :D.
     
  12. Stratos

    Hitman

    Joined: Jan 6, 2005

    Posts: 545

    Location: Portsmouth

    thanks for all the info! is a bandit a good bike to start with?
     
  13. agnes

    Capodecina

    Joined: Dec 1, 2006

    Posts: 15,816

    Location: San Francisco, CA

    Yes, just my 2 pence, A monkey can make a bike go fast in a straight line, but where 99% of new riders ditch it is on the bends, cornering a bike properly, not just leaning off takes ALOT of practise and skill, can be done easily, but that is dangerous, so watch some youtube videos, speak to your instructors and get good guidance on how to corner. You will eventually pick up your own style.

    Btw, another thing, cornering is not a combination of lean and counter steering, its the following:

    Foot position, weight on feet, leg position, outside leg tightness, hip position, back position and straightness (do not twist your inside thigh into the corner, keep it straight and inline with the bike/corner. Look into the corner and move your shoulders over as though you was looking past your mirror... Actually, I'm diving into proper cornering, can go on for hours, for now, just learn the basics and build from their, takes years to get even 50% of your bikes capability out in the open.

    ags
     
  14. Dano

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Dec 19, 2006

    Posts: 9,365

    Location: UK

    Yes, I'd go as far as to say it's a good bike period, I've spent the last ten years on one with no feel or need for anything faster.
     
  15. End Creditz

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Apr 8, 2003

    Posts: 1,044

    Location: NFA

    I'll 2nd that for the Bandit. Lovely bike to get experience on with just the right combination of speed and flickability (if that's even a word). If I wasn't such a mess of arthritic joints I'd have one!
     
  16. Mucky_Pup

    Mobster

    Joined: Jul 21, 2008

    Posts: 4,686

    Location: Hebburn

    The test hasn't been good to me (that bloody swerve, lol), hopefully going to do DAS some point this year, and then the only thing restricting me from getting a bigger bike is insurance, £2,500 for an R6, ehhhh stfu, lol.