Painting doors, which paint?

Soldato
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We have 10 internal doors and they are varnished yellow pine, we absolutely hate yellow pine, and as the doors fit, I'd rather not replace them. I got a couple of quotes to paint them, but there is no way I'm paying that....so what paint would you suggest for a really nice white gloss finish?

Not gloss though as I've painted with gloss and it's an absolute pain in the rear to paint with.

rotters
 
Soldato
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You won't get a gloss finish unless you use gloss. That's why the quotes are high because it's not easy to work with, and if they're already varnished they may need sanded down to give them a proper key...

New doors aren't expensive.. I was quoted £60 per door for supply, fixings and hanging.
 
Permabanned
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Can you spray gloss paint?

I've got a HFLP sprayer but I haven't looked to see if such a thing were possible.
 
Soldato
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if you sand them and undercoat them, using gloss is no problem at all and no diff to any other paint, sparingly and dont get runs, its you.
 
Soldato
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Yes you can spray gloss, needs to be thinned down though.

Best to rub down, then used a oil base combined primer/undercoat, then a oil based satin or gloss finish.

I find Oil base is harder wearing than water base paint, & I prefer a satin finish as you don't get glare from from the lights bouncing of the gloss finish.

You also a use a 4" mini roller for main area of door, & cut in beading with a fine brush.
paint in situ or remove door & lay flat.

I use these sleeves:

http://www.toolstation.com/shop/Pai...Roller+Sleeves+4+Long+Pile/d150/sd3171/p99855
 
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Soldato
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rub down, undercoat and paint with water based gloss. not as hard wearing as oil based but quicker to dry (2 hours), easier to apply, and less odour.
 
Soldato
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I would still rub a bit of sandpaper over your doors tho, as it will just give the new paint something to key to, otherwise itll peel off like wallpaper, quick light sand, dulux or crown undercoat, even BQs own would be fine, then just gloss, just dont put too much on and spread it then you wont get runs. You will be absolutely fine if you follow this. Otherwise you'll be doing it again this time next year and wont of saved yourself any time or money.
 
Soldato
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If you want a good quality gloss finish you are going to have to use a solvent based paint. It really isn't that hard to use, its just a pain to clean up afterwards. But you could just do all the doors in one go and then bin the roller etc afterwards. I recently painted all my doors using dulux satinwood and a foam roller. It was really easy and gave a very good finish.
 
Soldato
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sand down and paint, take your time and it's straight forward. Might be easier to remove and rehang if you can.

Satin is a lot easier to work with than gloss IMO.

Also, use a brush, not a roller.
 
Associate
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Just been decorating here, my research turned up a possible problem with the current / recent oil based glosses etc

Apparently they might yellow much faster than they should, you might wanna look into it.

I avoided it by using water based diamond satinwood instead.
 
Associate
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Key it, use Zinsser BIN (not Bullseye as above) as it's shellac based, then paint as a new surface. You could use the Zinsser as an undercoat but it's expensive so use 1 coat to grip then flip to normal undercoat.

I've done this on waxed pine doors and it took.

For paint, just use Dulux Trade Undercoat and Gloss or something similar.... don't go for one coats.

Worth noting that if you value your time (and place a cost on it), buying new doors is cheaper.
 
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Associate
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i use that eggshell stuff on mine, not matte, not gloss, somewhere inbetween
 
Soldato
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Key down with some 120 grit.
Rub down with tack cloth.
Presuming you have a solid layer of paint underneath, skip any undercoat and go straight to gloss.
If there are areas of bare wood, undercoat with Zinsser (it's pricey but fantastic).

For gloss I've never found anything that comes close to Permaglaze (it's a Crown trade variety). It's a pleasure to work with (and I usually hate gloss) and the finish is great.
 
Associate
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Just been decorating here, my research turned up a possible problem with the current / recent oil based glosses etc

Apparently they might yellow much faster than they should, you might wanna look into it.

I avoided it by using water based diamond satinwood instead.

I think I heard about that on Watchdog - the industry had to meet targets regarding the VOC content of their paints and the new formulation Dulux came up for their white gloss yellowed within weeks. There were a few disgruntled customers to say the least!
 
Caporegime
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Sand off the existing coat to key the surface, degrease them, apply a coat of white primer, followed by two coats of a good quality oil based undercoat, finish with a good quality gloss paint. And btw, are the doors flush, (ie fully flat) or panneled doors? Either way, a mohair roller can be used to speed things up. Dont use a fluffy radiator roller, especially a new roller sleeve. They cast hairs like a dog even after being washed.
 
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