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Prescription swimming goggles

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Destination, Jul 28, 2018.

  1. Destination

    Capodecina

    Joined: May 31, 2009

    Posts: 19,034

    Prescription swimming goggles
    Has anyone purchases full prescription swimming goggles, rather than ones which estimate to nearest dioptre and don't help with astigmatism?

    I've had a look online and price seem to range from £80 upwards to £150.
    Anyone bought cheaper or has company they would recommend?

    Do specsavers do full prescription or just the nearest dioptre stuff, the person in store wasn't entirely clear when i phoned?
     
  2. Buddy

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Sep 7, 2009

    Posts: 1,534

    Location: London

    Wear lenses. But normal goggles over top. Problem solved. That's what I've done lots of times with out any issue.
     
  3. Destination

    Capodecina

    Joined: May 31, 2009

    Posts: 19,034

    Been twenty years since I wore lenses.
    That is what i used to do.
    Really don't think i could be bothered with getting used to them again.
     
  4. mattcrane

    Hitman

    Joined: Jul 29, 2014

    Posts: 573

    Location: Truro, Cornwall, UK

    Although thats exactly what I do I am constantly being told off by my optician, the problem is if you get a significant amount of water in your goggles and it gets behind the lens it can contain a specific bacteria which can destroy the optic nerve within something stupid like 48hrs if not treated quickly, what she suggests is wearing one set of lenses to swim then change them out for a fresh pair once you are finished, obviously though this can be very expensive.

    I swim a mile every day and have yet to have a problem just wearing one pair.

    Didn't even look at prescription goggles as that would mean having to wear glasses to drive to the pool and home then putting in lenses which sounds like too much aggro to me :)
     
  5. Bassmansam

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Nov 22, 2007

    Posts: 2,313

    That is really risky, if you get a splash of water in your eye with contacts in you could get that bug that literally eats your eye!
     
  6. [YG]Bug-Eyed

    Gangster

    Joined: Oct 16, 2003

    Posts: 328

    Location: Stocksfield, Northumberland

    Surely only if you don’t change or wash contacts when you get out? I use daily disposables and just bin them when I come out.
     
  7. Malevolence

    Capodecina

    Joined: Oct 21, 2011

    Posts: 12,294

    And what about those of us who can't wear lenses due to a medical condition?
     
  8. Bassmansam

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Nov 22, 2007

    Posts: 2,313

    No, if the bacteria gets in your eye the damage will start immediately, regardless of whether you take the lenses out or not. Why take the risk?
     
  9. Buddy

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Sep 7, 2009

    Posts: 1,534

    Location: London

    Well you've answered your own question then?

    Anyway, I've found if goggles are tightly secured no water gets in. Sure it's a pain so appreciate why op wants a more robust solution.
     
  10. Jester*

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Apr 25, 2013

    Posts: 1,552

    Location: Kent

    Get eyes lasered.

    Buy normal goggles. Problem solved :D
     
  11. mattcrane

    Hitman

    Joined: Jul 29, 2014

    Posts: 573

    Location: Truro, Cornwall, UK

    And then what? Do you put another set of dailies in? Thats just stupidly expensive 2 sets of lenses a day......
     
  12. Dis86

    Capodecina

    Joined: Dec 23, 2011

    Posts: 20,006

    Location: Northern England

    Why do you need prescription goggles? Surely all you need to see is that thick black/Blue line under you?
    Maybe the backstroke flags above.
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2018
  13. x-st

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Jul 30, 2016

    Posts: 1,311

    How much astigmatism do you have? Most people get by with a best vision approximation. Also, if you're short sighted and do a lot of swimming perhaps you could consider Eye Dream/Ortho-keratology.
     
  14. tek81

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Jul 1, 2015

    Posts: 2,037

    Location: UK

    I used to wear lenses for cycling and swimming. Then, rather foolishly, I slept in them and ended up with a terrible eye infection. I can now no longer wear lenses. With that in mind, my advice is; bionic eyeballs.
     
  15. Zenith

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Feb 18, 2003

    Posts: 1,059

    Location: York

    Have you tried the speedo mariner goggles? I have slight astigmatism but I’ve found them to be great. Even if they’re not quite perfect does it matter for swimming anyway?
     
  16. jpaul

    Soldato

    Joined: Mar 1, 2010

    Posts: 7,342

    look in swimming thread - have disscussed several times

    [​IMG]
     
  17. CREATIVE!11

    Soldato

    Joined: Apr 21, 2007

    Posts: 6,290

    20 years is a long time, they've changed a lot.

    These days they are made of fancy new materials and fairly thin. You don't even really notice once they are in aside odd little bit of dry eyes.
     
  18. Destination

    Capodecina

    Joined: May 31, 2009

    Posts: 19,034

    Is this not simple a separate diopter lens as one can get all over the place, i don't see anywhere to correct cylinder or axis in this prescription.
    I have a set of diopter goggles, I want something more accurate.
     
  19. jpaul

    Soldato

    Joined: Mar 1, 2010

    Posts: 7,342

    ymmv works ok for a 180degree axis 0.25cyl ... can see jellyfish / the clock / nail-varnish colour ;)
     
  20. Rimsy

    Mobster

    Joined: Sep 13, 2008

    Posts: 4,288

    I wear dailies when in the sea and immediately take them out once out of the sea... Like countless others have had no issue doing this for many years. Guess if you don't wear glasses and insist on wearing contacts then this could end up expensive but that's personal choice