When are you going fully electric?

Soldato
Joined
18 Oct 2002
Posts
19,951
. You aint going to get ships etc running on H2 without the infrastructure world wide in place to do it and tbh I'd love to see it..
I’m not sure where you are based but in the UK the pipeline infrastructure is already in place.
The National Tranmission System (NTS) is the network of gas pipelines that supply gas to power stations and large industrial users from terminals situated on the coast, and to gas distribution companies that supply commercial and domestic users.

This network can be be used to transport hydrogen to storage tanks and homes.

51687785400_3f986ab07c_b.jpg
 
Associate
Joined
30 Jun 2009
Posts
116
I’m not sure where you are based but in the UK the pipeline infrastructure is already in place.
The National Tranmission System (NTS) is the network of gas pipelines that supply gas to power stations and large industrial users from terminals situated on the coast, and to gas distribution companies that supply commercial and domestic users.

This network can be be used to transport hydrogen to storage tanks and homes.

How does it get from the storage tanks to the H2 stations? Or to construction sites with no underlying infrastructure. What is the impact on existing gas supplies if you start pumping H2 down the same pipes or do you need to build new pipes? How much will be lost? Are there any additional safety considerations? If you are using ships, then everywhere the ship needs to dock then needs such a pipeline to feed it. Is that the case? Presumably we will get different H2 supplying companies wanting to use the same pipeline. How does the commercial model work? Can’t really differentiate Shell hydrogen from BP so how do you bill them for transport. How much goes in? Etc

Point is, None of this is as easy or quick as it seems, and none of it is the zero-emission panacea people make it out to be. There is always an environmental cost. The only question is which has the least cost for the most benefit?
 
Last edited:
Soldato
Joined
18 Oct 2002
Posts
19,951
Polestar has just enabled an OTA Performance upgrade for £975 taking power from 408bhp to 476bhp - nice :)

51688310933_cc838541bb_b.jpg
 
Caporegime
Joined
21 Oct 2002
Posts
25,058
Location
Berks / Moscow
Polestar has just enabled an OTA Performance upgrade for £975 taking power from 408bhp to 476bhp - nice :)

51688310933_cc838541bb_b.jpg
Is yours the dual motor? How you finding it. Was looking at them on our work scheme. Problem is I’ve done a lot of miles in a ipace and it’s spoilt me.
 
Soldato
Joined
18 Oct 2002
Posts
19,951
Is yours the dual motor? How you finding it. Was looking at them on our work scheme. Problem is I’ve done a lot of miles in a ipace and it’s spoilt me.
Yep - I have the Dual Motor version.
All good after 12 months. It's basically an iPace with better infotainment, faster charging speed for less money.....but without the 'Jaaaaaaaag' badge :p
Range is probably the big talking point with EV's : expect this to be about 180 miles in Winter and 220 miles in the Summer.
 
Soldato
Joined
17 Apr 2009
Posts
7,350
I wasn’t talking about right now, but in 6-8 years when hydrogen generation and fuel system is more mature.

More like 10-15 years.

The main use for hydrogen through to 2030 will be industrial; replacing natural gas with hydrogen in furnaces, for example. That hydrogen will be produced by gas reformation with carbon capture. And it will be expensive. It isn't until next decade that the UK government is forecasting significant hydrogen penetration in to other sectors. And even then, there are significant uncertainties.

For hydrogen to be a significant presence in our energy future, production needs to get cleaner and cheaper. Production methods like electrolysis and biomass gasification need to reach a point where they can be rolled out at scale. And while we're waiting on that happening, other technologies are developing which fulfill the same role as hydrogen. As a result, it's not even certain how much of a role hydrogen will play. Take domestic heating. The government's 2030 projection is 0-45TWh. This is because hydrogen could still be too expensive for domestic use by 2035, and because competing solutions like heat pumps have at least a decade of improvements ahead of them before the government can seriously consider piping hydrogen directly to millions of homes.

Time has been, and will remain, hydrogen's biggest problem. It could be our main means of storing an transporting energy in 30 years. Or it could be a specialist solution, used in only a few applications.

One thing that is telling; the UK's hydrogen strategy makes no allowance for hydrogen as a fuel source for passenger cars. So it seems like the UK government already thinks that ship has sailed.
 
Caporegime
Joined
20 Jan 2005
Posts
42,878
Location
Co Durham
I’m not sure why you would want to spend £1k on DLC for a car you don’t own though?

Leasing for 3 years isnt much different to owning one for three years. On you basis why spec an upgraded stereo or a 6 cylinder vs 4 cylinder on a lease car as you dont own it and will only cost you more money each month?

I am sure there would be loads of lease people willing to pay an extra £27 per month for 3 years to have the extra performance.

And if you own it, its not like you will get the full £995 back after 3 years when you sell it on so why did you bother?
 
Soldato
Joined
9 Mar 2003
Posts
10,781
Leasing for 3 years isnt much different to owning one for three years. On you basis why spec an upgraded stereo or a 6 cylinder vs 4 cylinder on a lease car as you dont own it and will only cost you more money each month?

I am sure there would be loads of lease people willing to pay an extra £27 per month for 3 years to have the extra performance.

And if you own it, its not like you will get the full £995 back after 3 years when you sell it on so why did you bother?

Sorry, what I meant was why would owners who are already part way through their lease rather than people buying it from new.

I’d you owned the car you would get a proportion of that £1k back when you sell it, the same applies to cars which have upgraded infotainment compared to that that don’t. They are objectively more desirable.
 
Caporegime
Joined
20 Jan 2005
Posts
42,878
Location
Co Durham
Sorry, what I meant was why would owners who are already part way through their lease rather than people buying it from new.

I’d you owned the car you would get a proportion of that £1k back when you sell it, the same applies to cars which have upgraded infotainment compared to that that don’t. They are objectively more desirable.

Clearly somebody with 3 months left would be mad, but somebody who got the car last month when it wasnt available certainly might want it. My point is, its not allowed on lease/fleet cars so the person have no choice.

I know if i had leased one in the last 6 months, I would pay for the upgrade.
 
Soldato
Joined
1 Mar 2010
Posts
17,413
Polestar has just enabled an OTA Performance upgrade for £975 taking power from 408bhp to 476bhp - nice
wouldn't you want to know how the torque curve is modified, ie. is the additional hp beneficial at higher speeds ?
 
Soldato
Joined
19 Oct 2002
Posts
14,627
Location
Shakespeare’s County
Screw Tesla. The inconsistency of the acceleration is tedious at the best of times. It’s 30Nm of torque on the Polestar, you know the “legacy automakers” which means they aren’t cowboys rinsing everything to the max.

5 seconds of googling Polestar2 is a waste of time if you end with a Tesla result.
 
Soldato
Joined
13 Apr 2009
Posts
5,155
Location
UK
With WBAC offering an obscene amount for my car (about £4,500 over my remaining finance) I'm thinking of downsizing a little and moving to a Corsa-e or e-208 on lease in the next couple of weeks depending on what places have got in stock. I'll make money, drop monthly payments, and have much cheaper "fuel", at least for now.
 
Associate
Joined
26 Oct 2007
Posts
812
I’m not sure where you are based but in the UK the pipeline infrastructure is already in place.
The National Tranmission System (NTS) is the network of gas pipelines that supply gas to power stations and large industrial users from terminals situated on the coast, and to gas distribution companies that supply commercial and domestic users.

This network can be be used to transport hydrogen to storage tanks and homes.

51687785400_3f986ab07c_b.jpg
There maybe a pipe network in place for gas but it would be a Stretch to think its up to the task of handling hydrogen.

https://networks.online/gas/could-hydrogen-piggyback-on-natural-gas-infrastructure/.

Just think about safety as well in your house.
Methane will hit the LEL at 4.4% if 100%methane, 5% at its current 95%ish concentrate and is at rush of exploding.
At >15% it won't explode, until you open a door to let oxygen in.

Hydrogen will explode all the way up to 100% in the event of a leak, big boom.

Whatever gets chosen, let's hope it's a safe and cleaner option than what we have now.
 
Soldato
Joined
9 Mar 2003
Posts
10,781
With WBAC offering an obscene amount for my car (about £4,500 over my remaining finance) I'm thinking of downsizing a little and moving to a Corsa-e or e-208 on lease in the next couple of weeks depending on what places have got in stock. I'll make money, drop monthly payments, and have much cheaper "fuel", at least for now.

Good luck. No seriously, I’d start making enquiries now as there is next to no cars out there sat in stock waiting to be delivered.
 
Top Bottom