2006 Monte Carlo Grand Prix - Race 7/18

Man of Honour
OP
Joined
18 Oct 2002
Posts
39,748
McLaren, Toyota left out of F1 Commission

McLaren and Toyota are two of the teams that have been squeezed out of the voting process within the new 2008 F1 Commission, which is being finalized today by a fax vote of World Motor Sport Council members.

The F1 Commission is the body that approves measures agreed by the Technical Working Group and the new Sporting Working Group, and then submits them to the World Motor Sport Council for final ratification.

As part of the wholesale changes to the sport for 2008, the F1 Commission is being restructured.

That process had to be finalized as soon as possible, as the Commission will have to act on the 2008 technical regulations before June 30.

Since their own next meeting is not until July 5, the WMSC members were asked this week to vote by fax to finalize the composition of the new Commission.

Only six of the 12 teams (including new entrant Prodrive) will be allowed a vote, rather than all of them, as was the case in the past.

FIA president Max Mosley said in Monaco that the teams have not been chosen purely in terms of their positions in the world championship, but on a national basis, via their entrants' licenses.

"We need to do it now by fax, rather than on July 5 at the next meeting," Mosley said. "Because any change to the sporting rules that affects the design of the cars for 2008 has to be made before June 30. What we're proposing is one team from each country. The FIA tradition is country by country."

Licenses tend to reflect the nationality of the team owner, rather than where the actual race team factory is based. That's relevant mainly because national anthems played for the winning constructor on the podium have to be that of the license.

For example, Toyota's top management would not be very happy to win a race and have the German anthem played, and the same goes for Honda, Super Aguri and Renault with regard to Britain, and BMW with Switzerland.

At the moment, six countries enter F1 teams, but Mosley said that Red Bull Racing will apply for an Austrian license, bringing the total to seven, leaving the split between the countries as follows:

Great Britain: McLaren, Williams and Prodrive;
Italy: Ferrari and Toro Rosso;
Japan: Honda, Toyota and Super Aguri;
France: Renault;
Germany: BMW;
Russia: Midland F1;
Austria: Red Bull Racing.

Mosley said that where there is more than one team from each country, "I think we would have to take the most senior team. For example, Honda is probably the senior Japanese team."

Mosley did not mention who would get the British vote, but autosport.com understands that Williams will be given priority, leaving McLaren out in the cold.

It's not clear what definition of the word "senior" is being used, because McLaren are ahead of Williams in the championship and have also been in the sport for longer.

However, Williams are already a member of the Permanent Bureau, which is a sort of sub-division of the Commission that votes on certain matters, such as the recent Yuji Ide situation.

It thus seems that the six teams who get the crucial votes will be Williams, Ferrari, Honda, Renault and BMW, with Austria's Red Bull taking precedence over Russia's MF1 for the final slot.

Apart from McLaren, that leaves Toyota, Toro Rosso, Super Aguri, Midland and Prodrive without a direct vote, although obviously Toro Rosso are in effect represented by Red Bull Racing.

The lack of participation by Mercedes and Toyota in the voting process will clearly be a major blow to both manufacturers, who by coincidence are also two of the less FIA-friendly teams in the paddock.

The other votes within the F1 Commission are held by the FIA and FOM, plus five race promoters.

Although no confirmation was forthcoming from the FIA, autosport.com understands that the five promoters will be Australia, Brazil, Hungary, Monaco and Spain.

In the past, there were also representatives of sponsors, tyre suppliers and engine manufacturers on the Commission, but they have now all been dropped.


Williams, Ferrari, Honda, Renault, BMW and Red Bull....

So:
Red Bull, FIA and FOM side with Ferrari
Renault, Williams, Honda and BMW oppose them.

That leaves the circuits to break the deadlock...they'll go with bernie in case they lose their license for a F1 event...

Hmmmm....
 
Man of Honour
OP
Joined
18 Oct 2002
Posts
39,748
Montezemolo unhappy with stewards' verdict

Ferrari president Luca di Montezemolo remains unhappy about the decision of the Monaco Grand Prix race stewards to punish Michael Schumacher over his qualifying incident - because they did not have absolute proof that the seven times world champion deliberately tried to block his rivals.

Backing claims from Ferrari sporting director Jean Todt, di Montezemolo said that Schumacher was punished despite there being no certainty that his actions were deliberate.

The Italian was especially unhappy with the stewards' decision possibly playing a decisive role in the outcome of the world championship. Schumacher's title rival Fernando Alonso managed to extend his lead to 21 points after claiming victory at Monaco.

"At Ferrari, we never argue with judges' decisions, much less when we don't agree with them," di Montezemolo told Gazzetta dello Sport.

"Regardless of the kind of justice - sporting or otherwise - I don't like a guilty verdict based on presumptions. I especially don't like the fact that with such a verdict you can heavily influence the outcome of the world championship."

Di Montezemolo added that the only positive he will take from the Monaco Grand Prix weekend is that Ferrari's 248 F1 proved so competitive in the race - allowing Schumacher to grab fifth place at the finish despite starting from the pitlane.

"Schumacher has honoured the role of great champion," explained di Montezemolo. "I think that was the best reply by Ferrari in sporting and technical terms.

"On Saturday and Sunday, ours was by far the fastest car, so we must not give up. It's imperative to carry on working, and I think the result at Monaco is the best demonstration of our potential."

Shock bloody horror there....
 
Man of Honour
OP
Joined
18 Oct 2002
Posts
39,748
No more teams, Williams warns F1

Sir Frank Williams has warned the formula one world against allowing more than twelve teams to compete in the future.

The Briton, co-owner and principal of one of the sport's most successful teams, welcomed the arrival in 2008 of David Richards' 'Prodrive', but says F1 could not sustain any more.

''Since 1970 we have had precisely sixty-one formula one teams that have come and gone, for one reason only -- money,'' Williams told Motorsport Aktuell magazine.

Sir Frank, whose squad is based in Oxfordshire, argues that team failures - like Arrows and Prost in recent years but Jordan, Minardi and Jaguar were sold - is damaging to the sport's reputation.

But he also thinks that having too many cash-strapped teams could upset the apple-cart for everyone because they would devalue the cost of sponsorship deals.

And he added: ''There are not enough sponsors with money for more than twelve teams at the moment.''

FIA president Max Mosley recently said that, in theory, more than the maximum twelve teams could be allowed to compete in formula one. ''If all the organisers and promoters want to make the investment (to update circuit facilities),'' he said, ''there's no fundamental reason why it shouldn't be done.''
 
Man of Honour
OP
Joined
18 Oct 2002
Posts
39,748
Sato still waiting for 'new' Aguri

The wait for a new Super Aguri is set to roll on a little longer, according to Takuma Sato.

The Japanese confirmed that the long-awaited 'SA06' is definitely not due to debut at Silverstone, scene of the British GP in two weeks.

Sato said: ''We won't have many updates for the car (at Silverstone) because we're waiting for the new car.''

Leafield based newcomers Aguri are presently bringing up the rear with a version of the four-year-old Arrows A23, with Magny Cours (July 16) pencilled in for a new car's much awaited debut.

Reports in Japan, however, suggest that 'SA06' will not be as 'new' as some had hoped for, particularly with partner Honda's fading support.

Indeed, it is suggested that the car is simply a long-overdue development of the existing Aguri contender.
 
Man of Honour
OP
Joined
18 Oct 2002
Posts
39,748
Renault president Ghosn confirms funding for F1.

Renault president Carlos Ghosn has frequently been portrayed as an opponent of the company's involvement in Formula One, but he gave the opposite impression when he met the press during the Monaco Grand Prix.

Only recently installed in the post of company president, Ghosn is renowned as a hard-headed businessman not afraid to take tough decisions in what he sees as the best interests of Renault as a whole, but insists that he will remain behind the F1 operation.

"When we are in Formula One, we want to be at the top level, and we will provide the necessary funding," Ghosn stressed, aware that the team has now signed up to the extended Concorde Agreement, which expires in 2012.

"The Renault-Nissan Alliance has the second-highest market capitalisation in the automotive industry, and it is second in terms of profitability, so providing a budget is not the issue. Indeed, we are in a stronger position than many of our competitors.

"Our team exists to achieve performance. We will not set a budget, and see how much we can achieve with it, but quite the reverse. The team is winning, they are doing a very good job, and we will give them the means to carry on doing so.

"We have a long-term perspective on F1. For me, personally, and for Renault, there was never uncertainty about our commitment to F1. We are here to attract people and promote our brand, and we are doing it with good results and in the right spirit. The question for Renault was, and is, how we convert that F1 involvement into growth for the brand. That will become concrete with Renault Contract 2009. There are a lot of cars arriving in the next three years that will benefit directly from the halo effect of our F1 victories."

Although all five GPMA members signed up to the commercial agreement at the same time, during the Spanish GP weekend, Renault was seen as a catalyst to the move, and Ghosn believes that the sport is better for it.

"Formula One now has a good commercial agreement in place, a good vision for the technology in the sport, and healthy competition - these are good signs for the future," he said, "I believe Formula One is getting stronger, and becoming increasingly popular, thanks to a healthy competitive situation.

"Four or five years ago, you knew who would be on pole and win. Now, there is more suspense, more competition, and at least three teams capable of winning at the highest level. That is important, because we are here for the public – to give them a good show including technology, including heroes and a competition between the teams."

The links between Renault and Nissan naturally lead to wider rivalries than just those on track in F1, and Ghosn appeared to be making a dig at another Japanese manufacturer when he paid tribute to his own team.

"The fact is that we have a professional team with gifted people, and they do not over-spend," he noted, "They are responsible. We are achieving the best results on one of the smallest budgets, and that is something that makes me very proud of the team. It would be embarrassing if things were the other way round, and we had the biggest budget with no results...."

Oooh...picking on another manafacturer...

Could be either Honda or Toyota... ;) More likely Toyota though.
 
Man of Honour
OP
Joined
18 Oct 2002
Posts
39,748
Jacques ties the knot

Jacques Villeneuve has taken himself off the market after tying the knot with fiancée Johanna on Monday.

According to the BMW-Sauber driver's website, Jacques and Johanna were married in a civil ceremony in Switzerland surrounded by 30 members of their families and close friends.

'The marriage took place in the Chateau d'Aigle and was followed by an evening meal in Villars, where they will live,' JV's management said in a statement.

'The religious ceremony will take place within the next week at a church in Paris.'
 
Man of Honour
OP
Joined
18 Oct 2002
Posts
39,748
Under-fire Schumacher apologises to Alonsop.

Germany's seven-time Formula One Champion Michael Schumacher on Monday apologised to Fernando Alonso for wrecking his fast qualifying lap for the weekend's controversial Monaco Grand Prix.

Schumacher was accused of deliberately parking his car on the circuit to ruin the defending drivers' world champion's best lap.

The move denied Renault driver Alonso the chance to better Schumacher's time and the FIA, motor racing's governing body, ruled the manoeuvre was intentional and relegated the German to the back of the grid.

"I can only apologise to Fernando," said Schumacher, who finished fifth after starting 22nd. "He had just honestly put the ideal lap together in this moment, but at no moment was it my intention, because I didn't even know where Fernando was, at that moment - because, here, with the strategy you can stagger things.

"He could have been out in front of me. He could have finished his lap. I didn't know. I didn't really care because I do my own job at this moment and I'm highly concentrated.

"So, absolutely, at no moment was that the intention. As I said, if you know what we know, then you would understand."

Schumacher said he was disappointed that he could not defend his position properly when he was accused of his professional foul.

"It was pretty disappointing to have to go and not be able to do something," said the seven-times drivers Champion.

"Although there was plenty of evidence and we managed to provide very important information that it was not possible to see from the outside. But nevertheless at certain moments, certain situations are pre-judged and that's where you are. You have to pay for it. We paid for it, we did it in style, we raced as hard as we could, and we got some points. What is important now is that we've got to look forward from now on."

Schumacher had earlier hit out at his critics in an interview with Bild daily: "I did not know where (Fernando) Alonso was and I have a clear conscience."

Renault boss Flavio Briatore, who was Schumacher's team chief when the pair were together at Benetton, was just one high-profile figure to express his disgust at the move.

Schumacher moved from the back of the grid to finish the race in fifth but is now 21 points behind Alonso in the championship standings after the Spaniard won the race.

"I am still second in the standings and I think the title is still possible," vowed Schumacher. "Whoever knows me and watched the race knows I do not do giving up."
 
Man of Honour
OP
Joined
18 Oct 2002
Posts
39,748
FIA reveals composition of the 2008 Formula One Commission

The FIA has this afternoon (Wednesday), revealed details of the 2008 Formula One Commission.

Under the terms of the 2008 Formula One Sporting Regulations the 2008 Formula One Commission consists of six representatives from the competing teams, five representatives from the race promoters, one representative from the commercial rights holder and one representative from the FIA.

Following a fax vote of the FIA World Motor Sport Council the following teams and promoters have been elected to the 2008 Formula One Commission.

Teams

Austria: Red Bull Racing
France: Mild Seven Renault F1 Team
Germany: BMW Sauber F1 Team
Italy: Scuderia Ferrari Marlboro
Japan: Honda Racing F1 Team
United Kingdom: TBA WilliamsF1 Team

Promoters

Australian Grand Prix
Brazilian Grand Prix
Hungarian Grand Prix
Monaco Grand Prix
Spanish Grand Prix
 
Man of Honour
OP
Joined
18 Oct 2002
Posts
39,748
McLaren stung by FIA exclusion

Former champions McLaren criticised Formula One's governing body on Wednesday after losing their place on a key commission from 2008.

The governing International Automobile Federation (FIA) said just six of the 12 competing teams, each chosen on national identity, would have a vote on its Formula One commission from 2008.

Red Bull (Austria), Renault (France), BMW (Germany), Ferrari (Italy), Honda (Japan) and Williams (Britain) were elected to the 13 member commission which must approve any changes to Formula One's sporting and technical regulations.

All the teams currently have a vote, along with representatives of engine suppliers, sponsors and tyre makers.

"Team McLaren Mercedes note the decision of the FIA to exclude the team from the 2008 Formula One commission," the team said in a statement.

"It seems surprising that the second oldest and most successful Formula One team for the past 40 years, with 148 Grand Prix victories, has not been included as a team representative."

The other members of the commission are five representatives of race promoters (Australia, Brazil, Hungary, Monaco and Spain) as well as the commercial rights holder and FIA.

The FIA, who want to simplify decision making in the sport after the expiry of the existing commercial agreement at the end of 2007, can expect plenty of allies on the new-look commission.

McLaren and Toyota are members of the Grand Prix Manufacturers' Assocation (GPMA) and have been critical of plans to freeze engine development.
 
Man of Honour
OP
Joined
18 Oct 2002
Posts
39,748
Teams to hold minute silence for Michelin

Teams and drivers will pay tribute to Edouard Michelin on Wednesday by holding a one-minute silence during testing at the Barcelona circuit.

Michelin, the CEO of the company that bears his name, died last Friday at the age of 42 in a boating accident off the coast of France.

Work at the Barcelona circuit, where eight teams are carrying out their preparations for the British Grand Prix, will stop at 2:30pm to hold a minute's silence for Michelin.
 
Man of Honour
OP
Joined
18 Oct 2002
Posts
39,748
Weber hits out at Monaco steward

Michael Schumacher's manager, Willi Weber, has hit out at Monaco race steward, Joaquin Verdegay, accusing him of being biased in favour of fellow-Spaniard Fernando Alonso.

"This gentleman is a Spaniard, just like Alonso," said Weber in an interview with Bild. "It was therefore not a good idea to let him be a judge in this matter.

"Would you let a wolf make a judgement against Red Riding-Hood?" he added.

Verdegay, vice-president of the Spanish Motorsport Association, had previously revealed how he and his fellow stewards had reached their decision on Saturday evening.

"We don't know if the manoeuvre was deliberate," the Spaniard told Gazzetta dello Sport, "but at that particular place he had certainly not done anything like it throughout the weekend. He braked 50 percent harder than on any of his previous laps.

"He then performed some unnecessary and pathetic counter-steering that lasted five metres until there was no more chance of going through the turn," he continued. "He lost control of the car while travelling at 10 mph (16 kph). The engine shut off because he wanted it to, losing enough time before hitting the clutch. His excuse that he did not engage reverse because there was traffic does not make sense."

However...

"If you make a mistake and lose control of your car, then of course you brake more," said Weber. "Anyone who drives a normal road car knows that. None of the stewards sat in that car... only Michael. This supposed 'proof' is ridiculous."

Weber took the opportunity to hit out at those within the paddock who were quick to attack, and some of the comments they made.

"The comments from Keke Rosberg were typical of the criticism aimed at Michael," said Weber, referring to the former World Champion, who pulled no punches when accusing Schumacher of cheating. "I do not understand what the problem is, but clearly there are some in F1 who get very emotional. However, before forming opinions, and pointing the finger, one should take a good look at oneself.”

The German also dismissed claims that Schumacher is preparing to apologise to fellow members of the Grand Prix Drivers' Association.

"Apologise? For what?" said the German. "Michael has the greatest respect for his colleagues, but what they might demand and what Michael does are two separate things.

"Monaco will soon be forgotten," he added, "especially if he wins the next Grand Prix at Silverstone."
 
Man of Honour
OP
Joined
18 Oct 2002
Posts
39,748
Massa defends Monaco performance

Brazilian Felipe Massa says his costly accident during qualifying for the Monaco Grand Prix will not affect his future at the Ferrari team.

"Ferrari know my worth and what I'm capable of, so it's certainly not an error like that that can change everything," Massa told Gazzetta dello Sport. "I carry on working as I always have.

"The only positive thing from the Grand Prix at Monaco is that the car has demonstrated to be competitive, so I'm looking forward to Silverstone.

"What happened was strange, because the car was well balanced and nothing like that has ever happened to me in that spot," he added. "Maybe the tyres were still a bit cold: all of a sudden I lost the rear and crashed.

"It's a shame because I had the opportunity of ending up in the top three."

Massa crashed out during the first part of qualifying at Monte Carlo, having to start the race from the back of the grid, right ahead of teammate Michael Schumacher.

The German driver was sent to the back of the grid after race stewards ruled he had deliberately stopped on track to stop his rivals from improving their qualifying times.

Schumacher, however, climbed back to fifth position, while Massa finished outside the points in ninth.

"It was a difficult race: unfortunately at the start I had to slow down because of the accident between the two Midlands," he said. "Compared to Michael, who immediately started to overtake because his tyres were already at a good temperature, I was entangled in traffic.

"I only had three laps with no one in front of me after the pitstop, and it's then when I managed to drive my fastest lap."
 
Associate
Joined
16 Jul 2004
Posts
1,795
Location
Leicestershire
rpstewart said:
He should have been racing 20 years ago, that's a real James Hunt move.
Totally!

One of the most 'cool' things I've seen in F1 for quite some time, straight away it reminded me of Hunt & >this< picture in particular. Top stuff.

Hooooooge congrats to DC as well.
He's doing an absolutely top job at RedBull, I really hope they extend his contract a touch longer & so he can play about with Neway's car.
 
Man of Honour
OP
Joined
18 Oct 2002
Posts
39,748
Coco said:
Totally!

One of the most 'cool' things I've seen in F1 for quite some time, straight away it reminded me of Hunt & >this< picture in particular. Top stuff.

How about this image... *nice reception ;)*

kimi.jpg


Miss the days that the driver would stub their cig's out on the side of the tub and then put their helmets on and go... :(

Simon/~Flibster
 
Associate
Joined
16 Jul 2004
Posts
1,795
Location
Leicestershire
Flibster said:
How about this image... *nice reception ;)*

//piccy//

Miss the days that the driver would stub their cig's out on the side of the tub and then put their helmets on and go... :(

Simon/~Flibster
"Allow me to help you with your helmet..."
 
Back
Top Bottom