Any builders out there?

Permabanned
Joined
17 Jun 2007
Posts
35
I have a rectangular room above my terraced house which is 275sq ft in size and normal room height, it is in need of complete refurbishment. There is no electrical cabling anywhere, no plaster on any of the the walls, and extremely old and rotten floorboards thoughout as seen below:

www.select.talktalk.net/1.jpg

I would like it to look like this

www.select.talktalk.net/2.jpg

I got a quote from a few local builders and they are all quoting 30-60k for the job so I have decided to do it myself for less than 2k as I don't have much more than that to spare as I am working 2 hours overtime every day to pay for my other bills. I was fortunate to see my friend's loft conversion done for an hour or so last week. All they did was stick insulating wool in between the wooden floor and wall beams in about 20 mins, then started cutting chipboard to size for the floor and plasterboard for the walls. It took them 1 day in total.

I have decided to do something similar with my house, but I need some advice e.g.

1. Can the insulating wool be of any type?
2. Should I order chipboard or hardboard and what thickness for the floor - 12.5mm or 18mm
3. Should I order plasterboard for the walls in 12.5mm or 18mm thickness?
4. I am planning to use a jigsaw to cut the wood, should I be using something a bit beefier?
5. Is there any pitfalls in electrical cabling, I was planning to order a 100m roll
6. I am planning to buy a 20 litre tub of magnolia paint from b&q for £20 - you can get silk or matt, the girl at the paint desk said silk means it is shinier? For a bedroom/tv room, what would you suggest and why?
7. I am looking for enegry saving commercial lights like they have at offices as they look cool - any recommendations as b&q only do designer lights which could not even light up a closet.

As far as the electrics go, a local electrician has offered to do it for £450. And I have sorted the wooden floor with another local for £300.

Thanks.
 
Man of Honour
Joined
11 Mar 2004
Posts
76,634
3. 18mm thickness
4. circular saw would be better and give a straighter edge should pick one up for £20
6.matt


cant help for the rest.
 
Last edited:
Soldato
Joined
17 Feb 2006
Posts
8,903
Location
Winchester
Mmm, just a thought but there may be any underlying issues, mainly regarding insulation.

Is it normally cold in that room? If so, it would indicate a cold roof. The alternative would be a warm roof (+loft) indicated by an insulated roof. I can't quite tell - is it an actual room or a loft?

Either way, with regards to insulation, You would need it thick enough so as to adhere to minium U values indicated by Bldg Regs 2000. I cannot remember it on top of my head. Warmcell is one I have designed with in the past, made from recycled newspaper - very sustainable but not as cheap.

Are the floor joists strong enough for what you plan to do?

Yes, do get energy efficient flurescent lights too.
 
Permabanned
Joined
29 Aug 2003
Posts
31,330
Kingburger said:
you can get silk or matt, the girl at the paint desk said silk means it is shinier? For a bedroom/tv room, what would you suggest and why?

Go for matt, it will give less glare if. Even if its only glare off the paint and not your actual TV set.

I've just had my livingroom plastered and I am putting up an LCD like you, and I am going matt.

I don't like shiney paint.
 
Permabanned
OP
Joined
17 Jun 2007
Posts
35
DB_SamX said:
Mmm, just a thought but there may be any underlying issues, mainly regarding insulation.

Is it normally cold in that room? If so, it would indicate a cold roof. The alternative would be a warm roof (+loft) indicated by an insulated roof. I can't quite tell - is it an actual room or a loft?

Either way, with regards to insulation, You would need it thick enough so as to adhere to minium U values indicated by Bldg Regs 2000. I cannot remember it on top of my head. Warmcell is one I have designed with in the past, made from recycled newspaper - very sustainable but not as cheap.

Are the floor joists strong enough for what you plan to do?

Yes, do get energy efficient flurescent lights too.

Thanks for all the tips guys! sure hope the flooring joists are strong enough ;)
 
Associate
Joined
19 Jan 2007
Posts
2,064
Location
Northampton
In France they use 70mm wool insulation in the walls, plasterboard over the top.

For the ceiling, plasterboard and ordinary roof insulation above I guess.

It looks like a half finished project already, is it a new terrace house or an old one?
 
Permabanned
OP
Joined
17 Jun 2007
Posts
35
WoZZeR said:
In France they use 70mm wool insulation in the walls, plasterboard over the top.

For the ceiling, plasterboard and ordinary roof insulation above I guess.

It looks like a half finished project already, is it a new terrace house or an old one?

Old
 
Man of Honour
Joined
11 Apr 2003
Posts
9,389
Location
London
Kingburger said:
3. Should I order plasterboard for the walls in 12.5mm or 18mm thickness?

(I am not a builder but have several friends who are, some of whom I have done casual work for in the past, and so I have an above average knowledge of building matters.)

If you're doing the work on your own, you'll run into difficulty with positioning & fixing thick plasterboard.

I suggest you use vapourcheck in case of mild damp problems in the future.


Oh yeah, your post doesn't mention the plastering itself...what will you do about that? Will cost a good few hundred to get a plasterer in, but unless you're good at plastering yourself, you'll have to do it to get a good enough result.
 
Last edited:
Associate
Joined
4 Aug 2005
Posts
1,430
Location
Leeds, Sheffield & LU7
Deadly Ferret said:
(I am not a builder but have several friends who are, some of whom I have done casual work for in the past, and so I have an above average knowledge of building matters.)

If you're doing the work on your own, you'll run into difficulty with positioning & fixing thick plasterboard.

I suggest you use vapourcheck in case of mild damp problems in the future.


Oh yeah, your post doesn't mention the plastering itself...what will you do about that? Will cost a good few hundred to get a plasterer in, but unless you're good at plastering yourself, you'll have to do it to get a good enough result.

He'll be alright fixing plasterboard to the bottom half of the room, obviously he's going to need a hand with the top half and ceiling. Plastering it himself isn't a bad idea as it's only skimming so shouldn't be too difficult.
 
Man of Honour
Joined
11 Apr 2003
Posts
9,389
Location
London
Kingburger said:
1. Can the insulating wool be of any type?
2. Should I order chipboard or hardboard and what thickness for the floor - 12.5mm or 18mm
3. Should I order plasterboard for the walls in 12.5mm or 18mm thickness?
4. I am planning to use a jigsaw to cut the wood, should I be using something a bit beefier?
5. Is there any pitfalls in electrical cabling, I was planning to order a 100m roll
6. I am planning to buy a 20 litre tub of magnolia paint from b&q for £20 - you can get silk or matt, the girl at the paint desk said silk means it is shinier? For a bedroom/tv room, what would you suggest and why?
7. I am looking for enegry saving commercial lights like they have at offices as they look cool - any recommendations as b&q only do designer lights which could not even light up a closet.

Sod it, might as well answer the rest of the questions...

1. Use standard rockwool.
2. Hardwood, not sure about the thickness. I'll ask a friend when I see him tomorrow morning...remind me if I haven't answered by tomorrow night.
4. Circular saw like someone else said. Jigsaw will be too uneven and take too long.
5. Several. Firstly think things through properly. You don't want to lay a load and then realise you have to pull it all back because of something.
- make sure the cable doesn't get nicked or kinked
- obviously, make sure you've got suitable cable: right thickness, enough of it etc.
- lay it neatly, in as direct a route as possible
6. Silk is shiny and more durable than matt. Matt is dull, and better than silk at hiding a wall's imperfections. Unless children or pets will often be in there, I suggest matt.
7. Look at the Screwfix range.


Hmm...about 2. - I was thinking marine ply, because lofts are often riddled with damp problems, but on second thoughts and considering the cost it's a bit over the top. I personally would do it, because I like to guard against the unknown, but on a low budget it's not realistic.
 
Last edited:
Associate
Joined
19 Jan 2007
Posts
2,064
Location
Northampton
converse_uprise said:
He'll be alright fixing plasterboard to the bottom half of the room, obviously he's going to need a hand with the top half and ceiling. Plastering it himself isn't a bad idea as it's only skimming so shouldn't be too difficult.

Yeah, I've plastered on bare walls and on plasterboard, plasterboard is very easy to skim in comparison to bare walls.

Just follow the instructions in a decent DIY book and you'll be OK.
 
Permabanned
OP
Joined
17 Jun 2007
Posts
35
converse_uprise said:
He'll be alright fixing plasterboard to the bottom half of the room, obviously he's going to need a hand with the top half and ceiling. Plastering it himself isn't a bad idea as it's only skimming so shouldn't be too difficult.

;) plus I'll just paint over the plasterboard, no need for plaster
 
Soldato
Joined
17 Feb 2006
Posts
8,903
Location
Winchester
I second the use of vapour check - essential if there isn't already a vapour barrier installed.

It's a bit hard to judge what's already there or not, and if that room was built ready to be lived in.
 
Permabanned
OP
Joined
17 Jun 2007
Posts
35
Deadly Ferret said:
Sod it, might as well answer the rest of the questions...

1. Use standard rockwool.
2. Hardwood, not sure about the thickness. I'll ask a friend when I see him tomorrow morning...remind me if I haven't answered by tomorrow night.
4. Circular saw like someone else said. Jigsaw will be too uneven and take too long.
5. Several. Firstly think things through properly. You don't want to lay a load and then realise you have to pull it all back because of something.
- make sure the cable doesn't get nicked or kinked
- obviously, make sure you've got suitable cable: right thickness, enough of it etc.
- lay it neatly, in as direct a route as possible
6. Silk is shiny and more durable than matt. Matt is dull, and better than silk at hiding a wall's imperfections. Unless children or pets will often be in there, I suggest matt.
7. Look at the Screwfix range.


Hmm...about 2. - I was thinking marine ply, because lofts are often riddled with damp problems, but on second thoughts and considering the cost it's a bit over the top. I personally would do it, because I like to guard against the unknown, but on a low budget it's not realistic.

Give this man a cigar! :cool:
 
Soldato
Joined
1 Jun 2005
Posts
5,152
Location
Kent
Doesnt things like laying electrible cable and such require a certified electrician to do it? otherwise if you ever sell your house, and the buyers see that the electrical work isnt certified, that could be a downside.

When doing the building work, allways remember to measure twice, cut once. If you only measure all things once, i can nearly garuntee that some cuts of the wood will be off.
 
Back
Top Bottom