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Any love for the BSDs?

Discussion in 'Linux & Open Source' started by Rainmaker, Jun 1, 2018.

  1. Rainmaker

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Aug 18, 2007

    Posts: 8,283

    Location: Liverpool

    Mostly pkg but I have used ports for a few things (including WireGuard). I like how with ports you get full search capability and can then compile and build the software in one easy step (make install clean), with the resulting install being totally optimised for your particular machine.
     
  2. Ice Tea

    Mobster

    Joined: Nov 1, 2004

    Posts: 3,222

    Does Wine work on BSD to use a windows browser for that?
     
  3. Rainmaker

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Aug 18, 2007

    Posts: 8,283

    Location: Liverpool

    It certainly used to, but tbh I cba with that level of hackery and extra code just to run Netflix. I tend to resort to macOS for my daily driver and swap between Linux/BSD as required.
     
  4. Ice Tea

    Mobster

    Joined: Nov 1, 2004

    Posts: 3,222

    LOL yeah , I got fedup with continually having to mess about with Arch Linux so i went back to Ubuntu as my daily driver.

    Embrace the point and click. :)
     
  5. 999

    Gangster

    Joined: Oct 17, 2002

    Posts: 437

    Location: Cardiff

    @Rainmaker, that was a pretty persuasive post! I'm going to give it a try as a result.
     
  6. Rainmaker

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Aug 18, 2007

    Posts: 8,283

    Location: Liverpool

    Cool. You'll enjoy it I'm sure. I'd strongly suggest you give something like GhostBSD a try first, as it has a pre-built GUI on top (it's just pure FreeBSD 11.2 underneath). Once you're more comfortable and have read the FreeBSD Handbook, it's not difficult to install from scratch and add your own DE, WM etc. Think of it as Arch Linux vs Ubuntu.
     
  7. 999

    Gangster

    Joined: Oct 17, 2002

    Posts: 437

    Location: Cardiff

    Thanks for the pointers. I've not delved that deeply into Linux but started using it nearly twenty years ago, and nothing else at home for about twelve. I'm sure I'll be comfortable enough with GhostBSD.
     
  8. SupraWez

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Nov 17, 2007

    Posts: 2,132

    I tried GhostBSD for a bit but then ended up back with UbuntuMATE which is very nice.
     
  9. Ice Tea

    Mobster

    Joined: Nov 1, 2004

    Posts: 3,222

    Does the lumina desktop have a hover preview for open applications on the task bar?
     
  10. Cromulent

    Mobster

    Joined: Nov 1, 2007

    Posts: 3,728

    Location: England

    The third edition of Absolute FreeBSD came out last month which I have ordered.

    I'm looking forward to using FreeBSD for a project I am working on. Originally I was going to use Linux but I think FreeBSD with jails and bhyve will be a better option.
     
  11. Ice Tea

    Mobster

    Joined: Nov 1, 2004

    Posts: 3,222

    A website recently benchmarked Linux against BSD and Linux was faster in a lot of the tests, I'll see if i can find the site and paste up the link later.
     
  12. Ice Tea

    Mobster

    Joined: Nov 1, 2004

    Posts: 3,222

  13. Rainmaker

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Aug 18, 2007

    Posts: 8,283

    Location: Liverpool

    I finally received my pre-order of the book from Amazon last week. It's *huge*. :o I'm looking forward to reading it.

    Phoronix is a decent website and Michael knows his stuff. BSD is quite focused and excellent at what it does. There were no benchmarks for pf under 10Gbps traffic or DDoS while still happily serving content, or routing 100Gbps of video on demand from a server the size of a pad of paper - both things FreeBSD excels at. BSD is solid, reliable and consistent, but it's not Linux. I just saw your earlier question btw, sorry. I don't use Lumina (I hate it) so I can't help you there sorry. I prefer XFCE on BSD.
     
  14. Ice Tea

    Mobster

    Joined: Nov 1, 2004

    Posts: 3,222

    The amount of hate that Lumina gets online i think i'll try it out in Gnome Boxes rather than a real install. :)
     
  15. Rainmaker

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Aug 18, 2007

    Posts: 8,283

    Location: Liverpool

    Have fun playing, but when you install it on bare metal just install the FreeBSD base and then add xorg and XFCE/Gnome/whatever. Freedom of choice means I'm free to think Lumina sucks. :p
     
  16. Cromulent

    Mobster

    Joined: Nov 1, 2007

    Posts: 3,728

    Location: England

    I've been reading Absolute FreeBSD today and have to say it is a pretty good book. Some of the humour is a bit silly, but the information is useful for someone reasonably new to FreeBSD. It is undoubtedly a decent companion volume to go along with the FreeBSD handbook.
     
  17. Rainmaker

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Aug 18, 2007

    Posts: 8,283

    Location: Liverpool

    Agreed. I'm looking forward to being able to read mine properly. If you're in any way network inclined, the Book of PF is absolutely brilliant also. It's due a re-write I reckon, but some naughty people have put PDFs online if you wanted a taster before deciding whether to pay out for a proper paper copy.
     
  18. Cromulent

    Mobster

    Joined: Nov 1, 2007

    Posts: 3,728

    Location: England

    I'll put that book on my purchase list as PF is certainly something I need to learn. At the moment though I'm looking at learning jails and bhyve first. Then I'm going to buy the 5th edition of Computer Networking by Tanenbaum which seems to be highly regarded.
     
  19. Cromulent

    Mobster

    Joined: Nov 1, 2007

    Posts: 3,728

    Location: England

    I got another FreeBSD book in the post today.

    The Design and Implementation of the FreeBSD Operating System 2nd Edition.

    It looks like an excellent book to get you to understand how FreeBSD works under the hood. I have a desire to contribute to FreeBSD so I thought this book would be a decent one to read.
     
  20. Rainmaker

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Aug 18, 2007

    Posts: 8,283

    Location: Liverpool

    I've gone the other way this week. I'm currently reading 'Mastering Linux Security and Hardening: Secure your Linux server and protect it from intruders, malware attacks, and other external threats'. Let me know how you find the book, I've eyed it on Amazon more than once.