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Compact Manual Camera

Discussion in 'Photography & Video' started by jellybeard999, Apr 30, 2018.

  1. jellybeard999

    Soldato

    Joined: Feb 7, 2004

    Posts: 7,282

    Location: Co Durham

    I currently have a Fuji S1000FD I bought many moons ago for about £70.

    http://www.digitalcamerareview.com/camerareview/fujifilm-finepix-s1000fd-review/

    I am looking to upgrade to something more compact with more flexibility and better performance.

    I've seen the Canon Eos M10 which comes to about £220 with codes etc.

    https://www.very.co.uk/canon-eos-m10-digital-camera-with-15-45mm-f35-63-is-stm-lens/1600112654.prd

    Does this fit the bill? Not looking to spend much more and tbh it will probably stay in auto mode most of the time, but I do like manual zoom and focus etc having used a friends DSLR. I presume this also helps battery life vs powered zoom, as well as being much faster?

    Any other suggestions? I've looked at Sony and Panasonic, but they're too expensive.
     
  2. a1ex2001

    Capodecina

    Joined: Mar 14, 2005

    Posts: 10,640

    Location: Here and There...

    The M10 isn't a great camera particularly if you want to take pictures of anything that moves! For you budget I would look for something second hand and go for the best olympus/panasonic system camera and kit lens you can get your money should land you an EPL6 or at a push an EPL7 with kit lens which I would prefer as a general purpose camera over the canon.
     
  3. beefybarn

    Mobster

    Joined: Jul 6, 2008

    Posts: 3,074

    Location: Brighton

    See if you can pick up a second hand Panasonic LX100, great little camera with a decent size sensor.
     
  4. EsaT

    Mobster

    Joined: Jun 6, 2008

    Posts: 4,284

    Location: Finland

    You really won't be getting compactness from APS-C sensor if wanting to have decent versatility lens.
    Which really happens with almost any system camera when having more than basic lens regardless how tiny and unergonomical body is.

    And especially that Canon has lousy ergonomics, if you use any bigger lens as it's basically tiny Ixus with APS-C sensor and lens mount.
    Also lack of anykind viewfinder means you're always using it in less than optimal stability stance.

    And you can basically forget using controls, unless you love wasting time in playing with menus.
    Your Fuji has simply vastly superior controls with lot more direct control buttons, while that Canon is designed as Point&Pray (that automatics works) with all settings needing going to some menu.

    If you want some flexibility and features you simply can't get smallest size.
    And fixed lens cameras aren't any different.
     
  5. jellybeard999

    Soldato

    Joined: Feb 7, 2004

    Posts: 7,282

    Location: Co Durham

    Thanks for the replies all.

    To get a meaningful upgrade, would I be better going for an entry level DSLR and accept that it is bulkier?

    We've got a basic ixus compact for general use which fits in a handbag.
     
  6. EsaT

    Mobster

    Joined: Jun 6, 2008

    Posts: 4,284

    Location: Finland

    DSLR with its analog film era mirror has its only advantages in
    1. Low power consumption (vs. live view)
    2. Phase detection AF in every model
    (+of course because of market saturation lots of second hand stuff)
    And if not shooting birds/faster animals that PDAF isn't such big deal, standard contrast detect AF is plenty fast enough for normal use.
    And they're stuck with lenses made for SLR mount's limitations.
    Also mirror and optical viewfinder get in the way of recording video using viewfinder for more stable shooting stance.


    Micro Four Thirds system of Olympus and Panasonic is very good for flexibility offering also some compact and light lenses, while also having higher performance lenses.
    (also good flexibility on bodies, though latest Panasonics are IMO too chunky with full DSLR weight without mirror chamber)
    Sure bigger formats have advantages for some situations...
    But performance of todays Four Thirds sensors is better than 35mm sensor used for lots and lots of acknowledged photos, when professional photographers turned to DSLRs and could keep pressing trigger without having to worry about running out of frames/film rolls.
    And then there's the chance of lighter travel package than in DSLRs: That best but too bulky&heavy camera sitting in cabinet doesn't take any photos.
    With cameras available today it's that being in the right place and skills of photographer, which make the difference between bad and good photo in 95+% of situations.
    https://petapixel.com/2017/03/24/battle-micro-43-camera-outsold-full-frame-dslr/

    Anyway for that kind budget you won't be getting anything but either very basic fixed lens compact or then second hand camera.
    Olympus Pens are pretty much made for that Point&Pray, but (OM-D) E-M10 would be good.
    While being compact it still has viewfinder and many direct external controls.
    Also rear LCD tilts bot down and up for easier shooting say over obstacle or from low level.
    E-M10 II has good amount sharper viewfinder than original E-M10 so would be better to try to get it.
    It's simply on different level to EOS M10, which is barely at level of that Ixus.
    https://www.dpreview.com/reviews/bang-for-the-buck-olympus-om-d-e-m10-ii-review/3
    https://camerasize.com/compare/#635,633


    There are certainly plenty of fixed lens cameras lot more capable than that January 2008 announced Fuji.
    Some 1" sensor cameras are even with on sensor PDAF and with optics covering well most things for example in nature/travel photography and actually challenging system cameras.
    But those are the size/weight and price of well over mid price system camera body and bigger than standard zoom lens.
    Unlike system cameras in which you can get lenses when you have need for something particular and can buy it.
     
  7. Energize

    Caporegime

    Joined: Mar 12, 2004

    Posts: 27,327

    I would recommend a used prosumer SLR like a D7000 which can be had for under £250, there are loads of lenses available for it and many cheap ones out there. Mirrorless cameras are also an option, but tend to be considerably more expensive for the equivalent setup and I'm conscious of your budget.
     
  8. jellybeard999

    Soldato

    Joined: Feb 7, 2004

    Posts: 7,282

    Location: Co Durham

    Thanks for the advice all. I'll pop in to have a look at the suggestions this weekend and get a feel for things. Budget isn't fixed, but it's more down to how much use i'll get out of it and how much i'm prepared to drop on a camera. I do enjoy taking photos, but wouldn't normally take a camera everywhere I go. This is where the compactness came in - if it's smaller, am I more likely to take it places? The current motivation for a new camera is an upcoming holiday.
     
  9. EsaT

    Mobster

    Joined: Jun 6, 2008

    Posts: 4,284

    Location: Finland

    Then while available cheap second hand (because of total market saturation and being sold also to those who didn't need it in first place) DSLRs are definitely problematic.
    Especially if you have more than body and basic kit lens in bag.

    Also Live Bulb/Time of Olympus would make taking long exposure low light photos easy showing exposure "forming" directly if you have any interest on those.