1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Garage conversion. damp proofing

Discussion in 'Home and Garden' started by Fairly sure the answer is no, Jun 5, 2019.

  1. Fairly sure the answer is no

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Feb 12, 2006

    Posts: 9,535

    Location: Surrey

    anyone converted their garage or know about this?

    been searching online for the options, but finding information from manufacturers more than real people so not trusting to advice given as they just want to sell their product.

    we've a fairly decent sized garage that we want to split into 2 using breezeblocks, leaving the front 2/5 as a garage, and the rear 3/5 as an office space with rear french doors for access.

    none of the walls are attached to anything, unfortunately, and it's single skinned, though the view from the outside isn't brick it's got a flat surface so had an extra layer of something on it. one wall will eventually become joining of the house once we do an extension in a couple of years.

    i've looked at tacking, insulated plasterboard etc, but find conflicting views of what I actually need to do.

    advice welcome. i can upload photos later when home
     
  2. Longbow

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Jan 15, 2004

    Posts: 9,339

    Did you get anywhere with this? I've been quoted, the guy suggested metal studwork, 50mm rockwool, double 15mm acoustic plasterboard, rubber dampening between the stud and boards, and then skim.
     
  3. Fairly sure the answer is no

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Feb 12, 2006

    Posts: 9,535

    Location: Surrey

    Nope nothing yet.

    What were his costs?
     
  4. Longbow

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Jan 15, 2004

    Posts: 9,339

    2k, that's a "standard" single garage though.
     
  5. eviled

    Gangster

    Joined: Sep 25, 2016

    Posts: 467

    epoxy paint the floor
    stud walls in timber and insulate in between - you want at least 50mm PIR (50mm rockwool is not a lot) keep 20mm gap from original brick skin to prevent any themal/damp bridging
    board the walls with plaster board
    lay some rigid insulation boards on the floor and then a good thermal underlay
    insulate the ceiling/roof as best you can depending on its construction.
     
  6. Fairly sure the answer is no

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Feb 12, 2006

    Posts: 9,535

    Location: Surrey

    thanks for this. would you not suggest doing anything on the current single skin brick? is tanking worth doing?
     
  7. eviled

    Gangster

    Joined: Sep 25, 2016

    Posts: 467

    tanking is only necessary if partially underground, or heavily exposed, it would be beneficial to epoxy the first couple of course of bricks with the floor though.
    A cheaper option would be to us damp proof membrane on the floor, epoxy paint is quite expensive

    If you use PIR insulation boards they come with vapour control foils on either side, so if snug in stud work and taped will be sealed.

    If you look at lots of modern houses they are single skin brick with a timber internal stud work
     
  8. Fairly sure the answer is no

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Feb 12, 2006

    Posts: 9,535

    Location: Surrey

    can you give a link to the epoxy we should look at?

    The bottom 2/3 bricks are actually lower than highest point of the patio outside. one wall is 2 bricks, the other is 3 lower.

    I've had a guy round that suggested something where we drill ever 10cm along the bricks and inject them to make them bone dry and that's all that's needed. ideally wanting this to be building regs standard as it looks like it'll cost more than i had first hoped.
     
  9. Josh Peat

    Associate

    Joined: Jul 12, 2019

    Posts: 1

    We had ours done recently and used Resincoat - they do an two part epoxy garage paint
    https://www.resincoat.co.uk/en/paints/49-resincoat-hb-epoxy-garage-floor-paint.html

    It sealed the floor and did the job for us, but ours was only marginally damp to start with. We just primed it with a dpm primer and sealed with the above.
     
  10. eviled

    Gangster

    Joined: Sep 25, 2016

    Posts: 467

    I would go for the better/cheaper/easier option of laying down damp proof membrane up to a few courses higher than ground level and add an air brick of too to let moisture evaporate.

    Its a better idea to plan to allow some moisture into the space between the stud and allow it to evaporate.

    [​IMG]
     
  11. Fairly sure the answer is no

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Feb 12, 2006

    Posts: 9,535

    Location: Surrey

    thanks. i assume the air brick goes higher than the membrane?