Help with a question

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been doing some online aptitude questions for practise (failing like anything on the maths) and came across this one:

question.jpg


Surely if the staff earn the same amount then the wage is equal across all factories?
Poorly worded or me being a div? I've given up on this test as there were other examples of other poorly worded questions and me not be able to get the answers they list.
 
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It does seem like a strangely worded question, but the first part of the question assumes every staff member earns the same wage in each individual factory. As above, manufacturing wages/number of staff. So factory 1 pays the higest individual wage.
 
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It means each factory pays a flat rate to all of its employees. Not that all factories pay the same rate.

There's nothing ambiguous about the wording at all imo.
 
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It does seem like a strangely worded question, but the first part of the question assumes every staff member earns the same wage in each individual factory. As above, manufacturing wages/number of staff. So factory 1 pays the higest individual wage.

I get it now. I knew what they were asking but wasn't sure if the wording was right.

I'm really struggling with the maths questions. Things I haven't had to use in years. Basic %'s but not when it's stuff like "if X is 20% of Y and W is 57% more than A, calculate D's value"...bah to that!


edit:

I've done a verbal reasoning practise. I see these things are going to infuriate me. One of the questions was "was the university best in uni in 2005?" The only data revealed was that it was "the best university in 2010 and for the past 4years" simple maths brings this to 2006. The only other data for previous years was in regards to an other university for the past 10years.
I put "can not tell" as maybe there wasn't any data prior to this university's ranking prior to 2006 and no other data was given for the year 2005. So surely logical sense says that if no data was given to contradict how it was placed in 2005 it's safe to say that "can not tell" hell the uni might have only been founded in 2006, there was no data to give evidence for or against this questions.


*grumble grumble grumble*
 
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This is a classic case of the most important thing you must do in an examination:

'READ THE ****ING QUESTION'

I practically have to chant that to myself in an exam to stop myself herp derping and going down the wrong garden path. For the question in the OP, I immediately went down the wrong garden path by starting to do things with numbers before I had considered what was in each row. A human mistake, but very costly!
 
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I've done a verbal reasoning practise. I see these things are going to infuriate me. One of the questions was "was the university best in uni in 2005?" The only data revealed was that it was "the best university in 2010 and for the past 4years" simple maths brings this to 2006. The only other data for previous years was in regards to an other university for the past 10years.
I put "can not tell" as maybe there wasn't any data prior to this university's ranking prior to 2006 and no other data was given for the year 2005. So surely logical sense says that if no data was given to contradict how it was placed in 2005 it's safe to say that "can not tell" hell the uni might have only been founded in 2006, there was no data to give evidence for or against this questions.


*grumble grumble grumble*

Do you know if you were marked right on that question with "can not tell"? I'm asking because there's no point getting annoyed with it if you were understanding and answering it correctly.
 
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Do you know if you were marked right on that question with "can not tell"? I'm asking because there's no point getting annoyed with it if you were understanding and answering it correctly.

Sorry missed that important point out. I got it wrong. The correct answer was "false."

Here it is. I still have the question open.


question2.jpg


Maybe it's due to uni "training" and from customer services work, where if info is lacking you can't presume what should be there, instead you'd have to go out and find it either through more research or asking the customer.


edit2: A couple more. Am I being a really big idiot here:

question3.jpg


It says "many young individuals are questioning wether going to university is..."

question4.jpg


again "are becoming even hard for school leavers to obtain"...if anything it should be "can not say" as not all applicants are school leavers.
 
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Re the increasing number, it's obviously false. It states that many are questioning whether but it hasn't provided a comparison between current trends and historical trends which would allow you to answer.

The second one is slightly trickier, it mentions just one group of applicants and it would be wrong (as proved by the correct answer) to assume that that is universal of all applicants.
 
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Sorry missed that important point out. I got it wrong. The correct answer was "false."

Here it is. I still have the question open.

Maybe it's due to uni "training" and from customer services work, where if info is lacking you can't presume what should be there, instead you'd have to go out and find it either through more research or asking the customer.

I think the pertinent information is what was left out - they specifically mention that as of 2010 (and for the previous 4 years) Insead was the best in the World. A reasonable inference is that they wouldn't have specified the date that it became the best if it had been the best for longer.

However I can see why you'd choose "cannot say" because it's not explicit there, it's an inference.

edit2: A couple more. Am I being a really big idiot here:

It says "many young individuals are questioning wether going to university is..."

You're right in the sentence you've picked out but note that it doesn't state that the numbers of young individuals questioning it is increasing - it may be that "many" have always questioned it.

Again though I could see why an answer of "cannot say" would be plausible. Picking "True" suggests that you've used knowledge outside that stated to fill in the gaps - you may be perfectly right but it's not explicitly stated as so.

again "are becoming even hard for school leavers to obtain"...if anything it should be "can not say" as not all applicants are school leavers.

I might well have gone with cannot say there but it appears this particular test is treating an absence of explicit information as a negative and that would explain the first question also. If that's the way that the tests you will sit is worked then I'm afraid you'll simply have to approach it in that way.
 
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Thanks, the last two were taken from this test:
http://www.practiceaptitudetests.com/verbal-reasoning-tests/testverbb/

I got 10/18. A couple of the other ones I got wrong where much the same issues, the other couple I saw my mistake afterwards. I feel like emailing the company and asking their logic behind them.

Again the middle question could be answered with "cannot say" due to it not giving facts that the number questioning uni is considering, but it's safe to assume that they are due to the other increases.
 
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I think the 'cannot say' answer would only apply if you are basing your answers on solely what you have been given. None of the above would therefore allow such an answer.

As for the best university question, and based on the above understanding it's obvious that it's false. It was the best in 2010, and the 3 (or maybe 4) years preceding that: 2009, 2008, 2007 (and maybe 2006). The article makes no mention of 2005, and we are basing our answers on solely the information given and therefore there is no way it could have been the best.
 
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I think the pertinent information is what was left out - they specifically mention that as of 2010 (and for the previous 4 years) Insead was the best in the World. A reasonable inference is that they wouldn't have specified the date that it became the best if it had been the best for longer.

However I can see why you'd choose "cannot say" because it's not explicit there, it's an inference.



You're right in the sentence you've picked out but note that it doesn't state that the numbers of young individuals questioning it is increasing - it may be that "many" have always questioned it.

Again though I could see why an answer of "cannot say" would be plausible. Picking "True" suggests that you've used knowledge outside that stated to fill in the gaps - you may be perfectly right but it's not explicitly stated as so.



I might well have gone with cannot say there but it appears this particular test is treating an absence of explicit information as a negative and that would explain the first question also. If that's the way that the tests you will sit is worked then I'm afraid you'll simply have to approach it in that way.

Thanks, very insightful. Sadly I doubt there would be practise questions for the one(s) I'll actually sit. I wonder if instead of the tests testing right/wrong it's designed to try and test the logic of the participant?
Either way I see it depending on the logic of the person that wrote the test and nothing more than that. Glass half filled type thing between, empty, full and "just half"
 
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Re the increasing number, it's obviously false. It states that many are questioning whether but it hasn't provided a comparison between current trends and historical trends which would allow you to answer.

It says "as tutition fees rise and graduate jobs are becoming scarcer many young students are quesitoning whether to go to university".

So it's saying tuition fees are higher than they were historically and that there's a corrolation between rising fees and students questioning whether or not to go. The answer is clearly true.

Edit: the only way it's not true is if there seperating "students" and "young individuals", but the answer would then be cannot say as opposed to false.
 
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It says "as tutition fees rise and graduate jobs are becoming scarcer many young students are quesitoning whether to go to university".

So it's saying tuition fees are higher than they were historically and that there's a corrolation between rising fees and students questioning whether or not to go. The answer is clearly true.

Read the rest of the sentence that you quoted. They are questioning whether it is worth the financial commitment and effort rather than questioning whether or not to go.

Plus, the article doesn't claim that higher fees result in less applicants.
 
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Read the rest of the sentence that you quoted. They are questioning whether it is worth the financial commitment and effort rather than questioning whether or not to go.

If it's not worth the financial commitment and effort then they're not going to go are they?

Plus, the article doesn't claim that higher fees result in less applicants.

Not relevant to the second question, only whether they're questioning whether to go.
 
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