How to learn about bikes?

Associate
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Ok, so I've always been quite keen on bikes (although never actually ridden one) & I'm going to try to do my CBT fairly soon. Only thing is, I don't really know anything (technical) about them.

Is there a good website/youtube channel etc that is good for starters? Initially I only really want to learn about what's needed to look after them/care for them.

So, any suggestions?
 
Man of Honour
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What ever bike you get, just get a Haynes manual. I don't know how people live without them. Well that's a lie, they pay the garage hundreads for nothing.
 
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What ever bike you get, just get a Haynes manual. I don't know how people live without them. Well that's a lie, they pay the garage hundreads for nothing.

Agreed, Haynes is a must for any home mechanic, but doesn't explain the rationale behind servicing etc. I would recommend the Haynes manual once you are comfortable with basics...
 
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Other than a specific Haynes manual for your chosen bike, it's well worth looking online for dedicated forums etc as it's always good to learn from other riders who have the same wheels.

Before I even got my bike I found a forum dedicated to that particular model and it's been a wealth of information...it's also been a great way of sourcing parts and learning a few things that sometimes aren't covered in the manuals.
 
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I have my CBT and Theory booked and have been looking into what 500-600cc bike to get as I will be doing DAS in April. I know nothing about bikes but from what I have read up on so far a new riders bike tends to be simple enough to work on. (unless you buy one of the tech galore bikes)

Like Diverse180 I will be hunting down a forum and a Haynes manual so I can learn about the bike.

Good luck when you do your CBT!
 
Soldato
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What ever bike you get, just get a Haynes manual. I don't know how people live without them. Well that's a lie, they pay the garage hundreads for nothing.

This! I would be lost without mine, my dad is very technical so I have learnt a lot from him over the years but also taught my self loads, just from taking bikes apart and seeing what is what, and also reading hours of threads on bike forums :D if you ever get stuck there is always someone that can help.
 
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This! I would be lost without mine, my dad is very technical so I have learnt a lot from him over the years but also taught my self loads, just from taking bikes apart and seeing what is what, and also reading hours of threads on bike forums :D if you ever get stuck there is always someone that can help.

Pretty much this, I was always helping my Dad in the garage work on his bikes from a young age and this taught me a lot.

If I ever get stuck I can just ask him or post up on a technical forum and usually have an answer within minutes.

A Haynes manual is also a good shout, or sometimes there is a service manual for your specific bikes from the manufacturer, mine has one and it has all the torque settings for bolts etc which is priceless.

There really is no need to get ripped off my dealers anymore unless it a very big job or needed for warranty related work.
 
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You can find a lot of the manufacturer service manuals on dedicated websites. They've got a lot of good info in.

If you're stuck, ask on a forum. Someone will know! :)
 
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All sounds like sound advice, cheers guys :) Currently reading through the website lollyhayes posted, some interesting stuff...

Are bikes actually as fussy to start as that website makes out, or is it just covering every scenario?
 
Soldato
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All sounds like sound advice, cheers guys :) Currently reading through the website lollyhayes posted, some interesting stuff...

Are bikes actually as fussy to start as that website makes out, or is it just covering every scenario?

Bikes will usually start without hassle unless they've been sat for a while.

If they don't then there's probably something wrong.
 
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All sounds like sound advice, cheers guys :) Currently reading through the website lollyhayes posted, some interesting stuff...

Are bikes actually as fussy to start as that website makes out, or is it just covering every scenario?

Yeh that guy is a bit neurotic about starting etc... Its actually a lot easier, especially if you have a fairly new bike...
 
Soldato
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Since you're doing CBT guess you will be getting something 125cc ish. Honda CG125 is recommended. This site gives you the basics of maintaining and running a CG.
Also explains bits and bobs about the engine etc that apply to all bikes.

http://hondacg125.awardspace.com/

I've just had a brief look, there is a huge amount of crap on that website so I suggest you take it all with a pinch of salt. For instance, the author genuinely believes that polishing the screen on his CG125 will make a noticeable difference to his top speed; genuine LOL moment when I read that :D

"In the UK I very highly recommend you never use supermarket petrol in any engine including motorcycles and cars.
The only branded petrol that I would dare to put in any of my petrol engines are Shell, BP, Esso, Texaco, Total."

The CG125 has proved virtually indestructible in countries where the fuel quality is much worse than ours; I somehow doubt running it on supermarket fuel in the UK is going to cause it to keel over.
 
Soldato
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How to start a bike with electric start:
1: Switch ignition on using key
2: Pull the clutch
3: Ensure it's in neutral (not needed, but recommended for beginner)
4: Ensure kill switch is set to run (if fitted)
5: Press and hold starter until engine has fired up

It's that easy!
 
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How to start a bike with electric start:
1: Switch ignition on using key
2: Pull the clutch
3: Ensure it's in neutral (not needed, but recommended for beginner)
4: Ensure kill switch is set to run (if fitted)
5: Press and hold starter until engine has fired up

It's that easy!

6. Ensure sidestand is in the upright position ;)
 

4T5

4T5

Man of Honour
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How to start a bike with electric start:
1: Switch ignition on using key
2: Pull the clutch
3: Ensure it's in neutral (not needed, but recommended for beginner)
4: Ensure kill switch is set to run (if fitted)
5: Press and hold starter until engine has fired up

It's that easy!

You forgot the choke. ;)


OP.
Just ask on here & the bikers will help you. :cool:
 
Associate
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I've just had a brief look, there is a huge amount of crap on that website so I suggest you take it all with a pinch of salt. For instance, the author genuinely believes that polishing the screen on his CG125 will make a noticeable difference to his top speed; genuine LOL moment when I read that :D

"In the UK I very highly recommend you never use supermarket petrol in any engine including motorcycles and cars.
The only branded petrol that I would dare to put in any of my petrol engines are Shell, BP, Esso, Texaco, Total."

The CG125 has proved virtually indestructible in countries where the fuel quality is much worse than ours; I somehow doubt running it on supermarket fuel in the UK is going to cause it to keel over.

Yeah I had a look, all that stuff about the fuel is new (as in posted this year). I think he has a point about ethanol content though. Ethanol doping of fuel is a new initiative that is arising owing to governments trying to be green, it is not a fuel quality issue (perhaps why it has not been a problem in the past when fuel quality was lower).

As for polishing the screen... Rubbish... But the other stuff he has to say about the CG125 and bikes in general is spot on.
 
Soldato
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What ever bike you get, just get a Haynes manual. I don't know how people live without them. Well that's a lie, they pay the garage hundreads for nothing.

The pain I am in at the moment, so many little fiddly jobs to do with the new 1098S (however, sending it in under warranty to abuse it until it runs out). But no Haynes :(

Downloaded the service manual, but it's not the clearest.
 
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