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Mess network with ethernet throughout house

Discussion in 'Networks & Internet Connectivity' started by Kemik, Jan 9, 2020.

  1. Kemik

    Mobster

    Joined: Nov 7, 2005

    Posts: 4,797

    Location: Widnes

    Hi,

    My home (3 bed, 2 story) has ethernet in every room. The network router is located in a cloak room surrounded by coats and I've noticed I struggle with signal in the bedroom and outside the house.

    Is there a better solution than running a mesh network like Plume? A Superpod and addon would set me back £198... thinking there might be a cheaper solution that is just as good.

    Thanks
     
  2. Janesy B

    Caporegime

    Joined: Apr 19, 2008

    Posts: 25,064

    If you have ethernet in every room just get a couple of cheap TP Link wireless access points, one for your bedroom and another wherever would be best for outside.
     
  3. Avalon

    Soldato

    Joined: Dec 29, 2002

    Posts: 5,156

    As above, if the issue is Wi-Fi, add an AP - you have cable in place anyway from what you say. Unifi AP’s tend to get a lot of love round here because they are (generally) reasonably capable and priced with a reasonable central management function, but TP Link are the value option and much like the managed switches and routers, they tend to bring a lot of functionality at a price point you wouldn’t expect.
     
  4. Kemik

    Mobster

    Joined: Nov 7, 2005

    Posts: 4,797

    Location: Widnes

    Do they need a same branded router for primary WiFi or would I disable my Asus router WiFi and use two/three of these instead?
     
  5. mrbell1984

    Capodecina

    Joined: Aug 9, 2008

    Posts: 21,900

    You not thought about powerlines some places hard wired and some ap's?
     
  6. DIABLO

    Soldato

    Joined: Oct 18, 2002

    Posts: 5,382

    Location: N.Devon

    No they don't need to be the same brand. Using the the same brand can some times have benefits such as smoother roaming between access points though.

    If you're living in a modern house though with stud walls and can mount a AP centrally you might get away with just one AP.
     
  7. DIABLO

    Soldato

    Joined: Oct 18, 2002

    Posts: 5,382

    Location: N.Devon

    I might be missing a trick but why would he bother with Powerline if he has Ethernet in each room?
     
  8. mrbell1984

    Capodecina

    Joined: Aug 9, 2008

    Posts: 21,900

    I'm missing the trick. Not entirely sure how my eyes missed the very first line. Alright AP's it is then. :p
     
  9. Avalon

    Soldato

    Joined: Dec 29, 2002

    Posts: 5,156

    Heretic! ;)
     
  10. mrbell1984

    Capodecina

    Joined: Aug 9, 2008

    Posts: 21,900

    nah bro a don’t have any powerlines pure Ethernet me blood :p:D

    a tiny itty bitty ap for my tefalone!
     
  11. thebandit

    Hitman

    Joined: Mar 5, 2009

    Posts: 645

    Location: Essex

    If you have an ASUS router, look into using an ASUS access point like the AC52 or AC1750. You can connect them with the LAN points in your room and depending on the the ASUS router model they will support roaming on WIFI which is a must in my opinion when setting up additional Wifi coverage. Alternatively, as others suggested you could go the Unifi AP route and turn off the ASUS wifi altogether (little tip, I bought TP link EAP225's instead of Unifi kit, exactly the same chipset only way cheaper and so far have been excellent).
     
  12. Avalon

    Soldato

    Joined: Dec 29, 2002

    Posts: 5,156

    Given ASUS’s proven track record for making really poor networking products, I have to ask, has op done something nasty to you?

    Roaming isn’t all it’s cracked up to be for a variety of reasons. The chipset point, while potentially correct isn’t quite that simple. Many routers, AP’s, motherboards etc. use the same core chipsets, they also vary significant in how they perform, that’s made up of the rest of the hardware design, physical build quality and design implementation combined with the firmware. I like TPLink, they have moved a lot of premium functionality into market price points it just wasn’t available in historically, but the EAP225 is up against the AC-lite, ironically the ac-lite is slightly cheaper - I know what I’d prefer to deploy/manage/support over its lifecycle, but YMMV.
     
  13. thebandit

    Hitman

    Joined: Mar 5, 2009

    Posts: 645

    Location: Essex

    Lol, I have no beef with the op. Just to flesh out my post given Avalons reply. I only suggested the ASUS kit as its cheaper (as requested by op) and is specifically what I had (ie I'm trying to help from personal experience). Whilst these are far from business grade solutions like the Unifi gear, for ~ £35 I found that for general home use they we pretty solid, not the quickest by any stretch but for the money, decent enough to extend wifi coverage. My router was too old to support the roaming feature offered by the AC APs however. As for the TP-link vs Unifi, not sure where the prices come from but but EAP225's are ~ £60 each, the AC-lites ~£75. I have no personal experience with the Unifi stuff but did lots of research, seems very good and I nearly bought this myself. The TP-link does the exactly same job for less money (assuming you aren't going to be spending your days micro managing your wifi network). For what its worth, I have found roaming a very useful feature, it works as expected, a noticeable improvement from the ASUS wifi setup I had prior. Btw I still use the ASUS for routing, mines been solid, never fallen over once (my only complaint, the VPN isn't the quickest, its processor limited)
     
  14. xb8browney

    Soldato

    Joined: May 19, 2005

    Posts: 5,459

    Location: North East

    Google WiFi pucks connected via Ethernet.
     
  15. Avalon

    Soldato

    Joined: Dec 29, 2002

    Posts: 5,156

    Both are £60 +/- £2 inc. VAT delivered for brand new sealed units when I look in obvious places, as I say at the time the AC-Lite was cheaper than the EAP225. As to micro managing, you really don’t need to, but you have the option - both take all of 5 mins set-up and forget, but if you do want to drill down into details, the Unifi kit offers more control/reporting and for the most part, proven long term support (my original AP’s are still supported). I’m not knocking the EAP, it does what it does quite well, but when the Unifi AC-Lite does the job at least as well, and offers more functionality while costing less, painting the EAP as a cheap option isn’t accurate.

    Oh and ASUS have a horrible history of security and hardware issues over multiple generations (5/6/8 series) with switches and AP’s dying and modem issues (5/6 series), unfortunately they don’t give a flying duck about resolving any of this in a timely or honest manner. They also faked FCC test data for certification and left known gaping security holes in play for years until a large multi-national retail partner threatened to drop them, they were eventually fined for both of the above in the US and ordered to agree to 20 years of external auditing. Recommending ASUS networking kit is the kind of thing you save for people you really, really don’t like :D