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Modernist Mac and cheese

Discussion in 'La Cuisine' started by garak112, Jan 3, 2017.

  1. Merlin5

    Capodecina

    Joined: Aug 17, 2009

    Posts: 12,237

    Location: Finchley Central, London

    Since there's a Mac 'n Cheese thread going, I will add that I 100% agree with garak, it's the ultimate in comfort food. And boy oh boy did I make a great one tonight! I didn't do the modernist way. I made a standard roux with 20g butter, 20g flour, 250g cheddar, a large pinch of black pepper, salt, and a couple of teaspoons of powdered Coleman's mustard that I mixed up with water beforehand. Added two diced up tomatoes. Poured 350g of boiled macaroni into it. Poured into a buttered dish, put a ton more cheese on top, a load of breadcrumbs, (overdid the breadcrumbs tbh) and baked. I have to say, this is a Macaroni Cheese to die for, it's so delicious, moist, creamy and so CHEESY! :D I'm led to understand that the mustard apparently brings out the cheese flavour more.

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  2. One More Solo

    Capodecina

    Joined: Dec 29, 2004

    Posts: 14,891

    Location: Manchester

    I've always found mac and cheese a pretty underwhelming dish, and although my OH was happy with the modernist version I thought it tasted a bit like Dairylea. I remelted the leftover "sauce" the next night and added a couple of teaspoons of dijon mustard, cayenne pepper and topped it with gherkins and jalapenos which was a massive improvement (the mustard mainly).

    I can't fault how easy the sodium citrate makes it but getting the right blend of cheese seems important.
     
  3. Moses

    Capodecina

    Joined: Jun 24, 2007

    Posts: 24,926

    As I was reading your post, what you said at the end was going to be my question - what cheeses did you use? But yeah, obviously throwing in stuff you like is obviously going to improve things.

    Modernist Cuisine have a load of variants,

    Monterey Jack/Stilton/roasted peppers/wilted spinach

    Sharp cheddar/Swiss/roasted apple/bacon bits

    Gorgonzola/Fontina/walnuts/sauteed mushrooms

    Gruyere/roasted cauliflower/roasted tomatoes

    Goat Gouda/Goat cheddar/caramelised onions/black olives

    The possibilities are practically endless.
     
  4. jpaul

    Mobster

    Joined: Mar 1, 2010

    Posts: 2,945

    OK so mustard and cayenne sound like a common denominator for next batch
    ..just realised could also add some into home made pasta directly too.
    (typically have only put worcestershire sauce into sauce till now)

    Should you strictly avoid boiling sodium citrate version or bechamel; with bechamel I have seen this split if it is oven too long or too hot ?
     
  5. Scottland

    Capodecina

    Joined: Oct 18, 2002

    Posts: 14,602

    Location: North Wales

  6. Glaucus

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Mar 11, 2004

    Posts: 75,478

    love mac and cheese although quite fussy and never perfected it, has to be unbaked, no toppings, no additions (well some sausages on the side is fine), just that creamy gooey texture. Love the texture from the evaporated milk method, evaporated milk, butter, cheese, English mustard. but its far to sweet for my liking, but roux base just doesn't cut the texture these days. tried the Heston one and it was vile, wrong texture wrong taste. beer wtf should be no where near it.

    will have to give some other recipes in here a go.
     
  7. Scottland

    Capodecina

    Joined: Oct 18, 2002

    Posts: 14,602

    Location: North Wales

    I prefer a vinegary hot sauce (like Frank's) to mustard. Crispy fried beef and jalapeños on top!
     
  8. Scam

    Capodecina

    Joined: Oct 20, 2002

    Posts: 11,090

    Location: London

  9. D.P.

    Caporegime

    Joined: Oct 18, 2002

    Posts: 26,498

    I prefer the Swiss Älplermagrone. Your regular mac & cheese (except you use heavy cream and not milk) but filled with fried onions, bacon, potatoes, with a decent crust
     
  10. jpaul

    Mobster

    Joined: Mar 1, 2010

    Posts: 2,945

    aka in France : tartiflette and mac ?

    .. am not convinced by this evaporated milk idea - 25g sugar per cup as Glaucus alludes.
    The EEC needs to give mac&cheesse some analog of Protected Designation of Origin.
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2017
  11. FrenchTart

    Don

    Joined: May 16, 2005

    Posts: 30,546

    Location: Manchester

    Tartiflette is amazing. Can't believe I only tried it quite recently.
     
  12. stewski

    Mobster

    Joined: Nov 12, 2015

    Posts: 4,014

    Not a fan myself.
    Also I thought in Britain Britain Britain we called it Macaroni Cheese still?
     
  13. Scottland

    Capodecina

    Joined: Oct 18, 2002

    Posts: 14,602

    Location: North Wales

    Love it. Not so in love with the stench in the fridge from the Reblochon :eek:
     
  14. jpaul

    Mobster

    Joined: Mar 1, 2010

    Posts: 2,945

    ... rebooting this - comfort food time -
    have folks persisted with the sodium citrate variant of mac'n cheese cheese sauce ? or too much hassle, maybe, getting quantities correct.

    I stupidly forgot it was sodium citrate from this thread, so last night (1st ever attempt) added some citric acid - the sauce no longer splits - but had to bin most of it,
    I hope there is no after-taste from the sodium citrate ?
     
  15. silverblack

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Jun 8, 2007

    Posts: 1,059

    Love Macaroni Cheese just do it the normal way but with colmans cheese sauce mix rather than a roux.Add loads of grated chedder,a dollop of creme freche,splat of colmans mustard and pepper.I'm not keen on adding extras like tomato or suasage etc just the mac and cheese.
     
  16. One More Solo

    Capodecina

    Joined: Dec 29, 2004

    Posts: 14,891

    Location: Manchester

    It certainly is - a place we visit in France for holidays often puts on a giant tartiflette if they’re doing a festival in town. It’s a true French experience. Reblochon is great.
     
  17. Punt

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Nov 17, 2003

    Posts: 1,094

    Location: Gateshead

    Would this method work with Cauliflower Cheese? Love cauliflower cheese! Trying to limit my carbs (medical reasons) and this will have less than a roux based sauce.

    Worth a try? Before I rush out and buy some of this sodium citrate.
     
  18. Moses

    Capodecina

    Joined: Jun 24, 2007

    Posts: 24,926

    Yes.
     
  19. jpaul

    Mobster

    Joined: Mar 1, 2010

    Posts: 2,945

    No - I'm not convinced by sodium citrate idea -
    suggestion that it tastes sour like the citric acid I inadvertently tried, Lopez does not seem to address that, which was quasi inedible
    I don't usually put garlic/mustard or other ingredients in that might mask the sourness, adding something sweet to compensate is daft.

    Even his alternative evapoporated milk based variant .. well that is sweet and has a distinctive, bordering caramel'esque, flavour.

    It is not so widely available either, one principal brand on Amazon/specialingredients.co.uk, but I would probably go the (unadulterated) ebay route .
     
  20. Moses

    Capodecina

    Joined: Jun 24, 2007

    Posts: 24,926

    It’s fine and I’ve had loads of stuff from Special Ingredients which has been fine.
     


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