Overclocking on BBC

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For some reason, I read that title as overclocking a BBC computer

HAHA me too! :D

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Who the hell pours liquid nitrogen from one flask to another with no funnel and no gloves on?! Crazy people

Because people are too paranoid about liquid nitrogen.

It's not like how it's depicted in the movies, it doesn't freeze on instant contact, it can take a while and it takes quite a bit.

For someone to freeze their hand, they have to submerge it in to a large amount of it and keep it there too.
 
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:rolleyes: So if it poured on your hand it would do no damage?
Ah, one google later I learn of the "Leidenfrost effect"
That reporter was definately taking the Michael though. :p
 
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:rolleyes: So if it poured on your hand it would do no damage?
Ah, one google later I learn of the "Leidenfrost effect"
That reporter was definately taking the Michael though. :p

I've poured it over my hand in the past. It boils off leaving a insulating layer of air between liquid and skin.
 
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Correct, I use LN2 on a daily basis as work (I'm an analytical chemist).

You can pour it on your hand and while it will feel cold, an insulating layer of nitrogen will form between your skin and the LN2.

But only for a short time mind and the nitrogen layer will soon become cold ;)

But yes, don't believe what you see on the big screen.
 
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I guess the problem is if it gets trapped against the skin, in a cuff of a glove, against the interface between finger and whatever you're holding etc. Gloves are certainly to be recommended!
 
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If liquid nitrogen boils at -196c why doesn't it simply disappear when exposed to room temperature?
 
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If liquid nitrogen boils at -196c why doesn't it simply disappear when exposed to room temperature?

Its been a while since I studied physics, but I think its related to ambient temperature and the specific heat capacity of the liquid nitrogen. It takes time for the sufficient (heat) energy to transfer over to such a point that there is enough for a state change to occur and this increases as you increase the volume/mass/amount of the substance in question increases.
 
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:rolleyes: So if it poured on your hand it would do no damage?
Ah, one google later I learn of the "Leidenfrost effect"
That reporter was definately taking the Michael though. :p

A party trick of mine in the physics labs at University :) Musn't use too much though.
 
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