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Recommend Me A Pasta Maker

Discussion in 'La Cuisine' started by jellybeard999, Apr 29, 2018.

  1. jellybeard999

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Feb 7, 2004

    Posts: 7,649

    Location: Co Durham

    Can anyone recommend a pasta maker?

    I've seen a few and they all seem to be around £20-£3. Lakeland and M&S look well reviewed.

    Never made pasta before, but it's so simple a process and fresh pasta is much nicer.

    Probably making linguine/tagliatelle type pasta mainly.
     
  2. Brian The Snail

    Gangster

    Joined: Jan 11, 2005

    Posts: 175

    Location: Sunny Suffolk

    For 1 person, 100g 00 flour, 1 egg.

    Mix, form, shape, cook.
     
  3. Scam

    Capodecina

    Joined: Oct 20, 2002

    Posts: 13,374

    Location: London

    I bought a cheap one ages ago and it broke on me. Seems to be the norm. Part of the metal that fed into the rollers bent in which made it unusable.

    I did a fair amount of research to replace it and Imperia came up tops. I think this is definitely a case of if you buy cheap you buy twice. I bought the Imperia probably 1-2yrs ago and it's still going strong. You can also get the add-ons for it if that floats your boat (and spares).

    EDIT: I still follow Jamie's recipe by using a mixer. Fresh pasta in minutes, no fuss.
     
  4. jellybeard999

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Feb 7, 2004

    Posts: 7,649

    Location: Co Durham

  5. Scam

    Capodecina

    Joined: Oct 20, 2002

    Posts: 13,374

    Location: London

    Yep that's the one I have, although I bought it from a local pro kitchen shop (another good sign).
     
  6. D.P.

    Caporegime

    Joined: Oct 18, 2002

    Posts: 30,662

    I had one of the hand crank ones and it was a right oaf pain. i love the att argument to my kitchen and so I can use both hands to feed the pasta. Much quicker and easier
     
  7. Glaucus

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Mar 11, 2004

    Posts: 76,645

    Have a watch off this mini series.
    Talks about stuff to look out for.

     
  8. jpaul

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Mar 1, 2010

    Posts: 9,619

    had contemplated getting an Imperia and still in shopping basket, but frankly usiing a rolling pin is not difficult.
    I had bought one of these for making macaroni
    Pasta Gnocchi Paddle / Ridger

    there are some results pictures in earlier thread,
    and would get, similarly, a ridged rolling pin for making tagliatelle.
    Most of the time taken is mixing/kneeding the dough, waiting for rest, so a machine does not save so much time. ?
    buying better quality eggs is needed too, to ensure good taste.
     
  9. D.P.

    Caporegime

    Joined: Oct 18, 2002

    Posts: 30,662

    The pasta machines are used for kneading though, makes life much easier because pasta dough is very hard.

    Also you really need to get a very consistent noodle size with fresh pasta, otherwise you find some pasta will cook to a mush while other parts are a hard paste still. Very hard to do that with a rolling pin.
     
  10. Scam

    Capodecina

    Joined: Oct 20, 2002

    Posts: 13,374

    Location: London

    We've never rested (or dried etc.) our dough. As said, we blitz the dough in a food processor which takes 20 seconds, then separate it into 2-3 balls, work them for a minute or so -- and get that going through the machine straight away. We tend to just make pappardelle for ragu though. We've tried ravioli a couple of times but the effort doesn't seem to match up to the result if I'm honest. I don't believe you are supposed to work pasta dough too much anyway? :confused:

    Yeah, agreed.
     
  11. jpaul

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Mar 1, 2010

    Posts: 9,619

    ypmv a couple I prepared earlier
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/food/2012/07/homemade-pasta---man-vs-machin.shtml
    https://thekitchenprofessor.com/blog/best-rolling-pin-pasta


    including below (not overworked but)



     
  12. Scam

    Capodecina

    Joined: Oct 20, 2002

    Posts: 13,374

    Location: London

    Good effort :) Each to their own really. I disagree with the link where it says it takes time to put the pasta through the machine. I do it a few times on the widest, then a couple of times on the next 3 settings. I skip the last one as it's too thin for pappardelle. Probably takes 5mins with my sous-chef/girlfriend assisting ;)

    What I love is to spend 3hrs making a duck ragu (cook legs whole in sauce, then shred them at the end), and make some fresh pappardelle. Yum.
     
  13. D.P.

    Caporegime

    Joined: Oct 18, 2002

    Posts: 30,662


    Yes, but the pasta machine makes kneading far easier. Form a rough ball, pass it through the machine on the widest setting, fold over, repeat for 5 minutes and you are done. Much easier.

    It doesn't take any time to put the pasta through the machine, and if you have a motorized pasta maker like the Kitchen aid attachment then it is effortless anyway.
     
  14. jpaul

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Mar 1, 2010

    Posts: 9,619

    one concern wrt to the Imperia is, I believe, you cannot dismantle them much for cleaning ? ...maybe the kitchen aid is better in this respect.

    I would like the Kenwood extrusion add-on with the brass dies, if anyone is feeling flush at xmas time though
     
  15. D.P.

    Caporegime

    Joined: Oct 18, 2002

    Posts: 30,662

    I don't think there is much need to dismantle them. Just a quick wipe down after use.