SP120s

Soldato
Joined
4 Sep 2011
Posts
6,479
Location
Durham
This may be a stupid question but here goes anyways- I have the non PWM sp 120's quiet editions cooling my h100i but I am sadly lacking in control through link. Now,if I get the performance SP 120's but run them at the same RPM as the quiet ones will they be much louder?
 
Associate
Joined
15 Nov 2009
Posts
2,490
Location
Up past london
this was a hard question to get my head around, the ones you have are quiet versions:
http://www.overclockers.co.uk/showproduct.php?prodid=FG-009-CS&groupid=701&catid=2331&subcat=4
Airflow: 37.85 CFM
Static Pressure: 1.29 mm/H20
Sound Level: 23 dBA
Speed: 1450 RPM

The non Quiet version: http://www.overclockers.co.uk/showproduct.php?prodid=FG-007-CS&groupid=701&catid=2331&subcat=4
Airflow: 62.74 CFM
Static Pressure: 3.1 mm/H20
Sound Level: 35 dBA
Speed: 2350 RPM

So 2350 RPM - 35dBA vs 1450 RPM - 23dBA (Not a bad increase in noise!) running the performance at a reduced speed would bring the dBA down but also you are essentially cutting the performance of the fan by upto half (Potentially, though they are slightly different designs).
Also you mentioned link, do you need it? Alot of people do not rate it very highly.
 
Soldato
Joined
10 Mar 2012
Posts
2,987
Other than fan speed there is no difference in the fans. It's the increase in speeds from the quiet to the performance that gives you the extra static pressure, air flow and noise.

I have SP120 performance fans on my H100i, the 3pin (non-pwm) and at the same speeds as the quiets they're comparable noise-wise.

I actually do control mine using PWM. A forum member on here, Tealc, makes PWM converters allowing you to plug 3pin fans into PWM and control them as PWM fans. You can find his thread HERE

Now with the PWM converter and the curve I've set the fans rarely spin over 1400rpm so some people will probably wonder why I went performance. The reason being that IF my system requires it, the fans CAN provide more air-flow/static pressure.
 
Soldato
Joined
4 Sep 2011
Posts
6,479
Location
Durham
Other than fan speed there is no difference in the fans. It's the increase in speeds from the quiet to the performance that gives you the extra static pressure, air flow and noise.

I have SP120 performance fans on my H100i, the 3pin (non-pwm) and at the same speeds as the quiets they're comparable noise-wise.

I actually do control mine using PWM. A forum member on here, Tealc, makes PWM converters allowing you to plug 3pin fans into PWM and control them as PWM fans. You can find his thread HERE

Now with the PWM converter and the curve I've set the fans rarely spin over 1400rpm so some people will probably wonder why I went performance. The reason being that IF my system requires it, the fans CAN provide more air-flow/static pressure.

Spot on mate. That is what I was trying to say,albeit badly! I am happy with the fans I have on max RPM as they are however they are permanently on full power and cannot go any further. I figured it would be better to have the performance ones and have the extra headroom should I require it. The fact I cannot alter fan speed dosn't really matter as such as I have them maxed anyways to cool my 4770k @4.6ghz but I would like the option of more cooling if or when I require it. Guess I'm just gonna get the PWM performance ones anyways so thanks peeps :)
 
Soldato
Joined
10 Mar 2012
Posts
2,987
so basically get the performance and a fan controller for my next part of my build build :p

Personally I wouldn't trust a fan controller with my CPU cooling, hence why I went with the custom converter I linked to. The converter is plugged straight into my CPU PWM header. Because of this, if my fans fail, the BIOS will shut the PC down before the CPU cooks.
 
Soldato
Joined
1 Jul 2011
Posts
8,531
Personally I wouldn't trust a fan controller with my CPU cooling, hence why I went with the custom converter I linked to. The converter is plugged straight into my CPU PWM header. Because of this, if my fans fail, the BIOS will shut the PC down before the CPU cooks.
Pretty sure Tealc's PWM converter feeds fan speed signal in and uses the PWM signal from motherboard CPU fan header. The fans are powered by a 12v molex connector from PSU and converter varies the voltage to fans to control fan speed.

Also pretty sure normal PWM splitters use the same connections but instead of using variable voltage to fans the fans use PWM signal to pulse the 12v power to control fan speed.
http://www.overclockers.co.uk/showproduct.php?prodid=CB-031-AK
 
Soldato
Joined
10 Mar 2012
Posts
2,987
Pretty sure Tealc's PWM converter feeds fan speed signal in and uses the PWM signal from motherboard CPU fan header. The fans are powered by a 12v molex connector from PSU and converter varies the voltage to fans to control fan speed.

Also pretty sure normal PWM splitters use the same connections but instead of using variable voltage to fans the fans use PWM signal to pulse the 12v power to control fan speed.
http://www.overclockers.co.uk/showproduct.php?prodid=CB-031-AK

Tealc's converters can be built to power fans from the header:

Tealc said:
However, this is the final product and this is what it does.

Control 3 pin fans directly from a 4 pin PWM fan header. That's CPU headers and GPU headers and any other PWM source in your PC.
Plugs into a 4 pin PWM fan header and spits out a smooth voltage the other side so you can control 3 pin fans with as small as a 1% change in speed.
You still get RPM feedback.
It can control between 1 and 6 fans (depending on current rating), from less than 0.1A up to 0.5A via a Hi-Med-Lo switch.
It will adjust speed based on the PWM signal it gets from your CPU fan header or the graphics card header.
It uses less energy at low duty cycle.
It can be tucked behind the motherboard or in a 5.25" bay.
It can use Molex or fan header for power.
It can drive fans down to 150 RPM and right up to maximum speed.
It's home-made.
It's safe. The circuit takes only a very small load from the PWM pin.

IIRC pulsing 12v to 3pin fans can lead to the horrible ticking noises that have been often complained about with certain fan controllers that use the PWM method.
 
Soldato
Joined
1 Jul 2011
Posts
8,531
Tealc's converters can be built to power fans from the header:
Yes, Tealc converters are custom so can be built many different ways. Simple fact is they use variable voltage to control the fan speed.
IIRC pulsing 12v to 3pin fans can lead to the horrible ticking noises that have been often complained about with certain fan controllers that use the PWM method.
How is this relevant? PWM splitter are just for PWM fans not 3pin fans.

PWM fans have a circuit board in them.

Plugging a 3pin fan into a 4pin PWM connector gives fan full 12v power.. no pulse to the 3pin fan.. so fan runs full speed all the time.. no speed control.

So why not use PWM fans with PWM splitter?
 
Last edited:
Top Bottom