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Swapping mobo, CPU & RAM - do I need to uninstall anything first?

Discussion in 'Motherboards' started by RampantMark, 3 Nov 2019.

  1. RampantMark

    Gangster

    Joined: 8 Sep 2019

    Posts: 116

    Location: Lincoln

    Our home PC needs an upgrade - so I've ordered a few bits for my gaming rig and will use the swapped-out parts to upgrade the other home PC...

    What I have at the moment:
    Gigabyte B450 Auros Elite; Ryzen 5 2600X; 16Gb Corsair Vengeance 3000 C16. (with Rx 5700 XT Nitro+)

    What I have ordered:
    Gigabyte B450 Auros Pro; Ryzen 5 3600; 16Gb Corsair Vengeance 3000 C15.


    I figure that moving everything together, intact, to the other PC will pose its own issues, but for the first project I was wondering whether I ought to uninstall anything from Windows on my current game rig prior to disassembly… like mobo drivers or perhaps the Radeon GPU software and drivers? Or should it just be a case of leaving the Windows install as it is now and then re-install new mobo drivers after reassembly.

    First job after reassembly is probably to enter BIOS and configure the memory and boot device priority and keep updating the sequential BIOS updates using Q-Flash up to the latest BIOS set, prior to booting to Windows for the first time.


    Any advice would be gratefully received.
     
  2. m4cc45

    Soldato

    Joined: 10 Mar 2003

    Posts: 6,630

    I would always reinstall Windows on a new build. It's not as much of a problem with Windows 10 (on the assumption you are using that). I find it's a far better experience and will rule out a lot of issues (i.e. if your PC blue screens then you are guessing between hardware and software where as if you do a new install and it blue screens then you can immediately start looking at hardware).


    M.
     
  3. bremen1874

    Capodecina

    Joined: 20 Oct 2008

    Posts: 12,048

    Windows 10 will probably handle the move between platforms without any problems. They're running the same chipset which will make life easier.

    I'd image the drive first (Macrium Reflect) just in case.

    Whether it's worth it will depend on how complicated your software configuration is. Reinstalling Windows itself doesn't take long.
     
  4. RampantMark

    Gangster

    Joined: 8 Sep 2019

    Posts: 116

    Location: Lincoln

    Realised after I posted this that I don't think the mobo is out-of-the-box compatible with 3000 series Ryzen.

    That means the process will now involve installing the mobo and new RAM with the existing 2600X, then a combination of sequential BIOS and chipset updates prior to removing the 2600X CPU and replacing with the 3600.

    I'll run the final BIOS update and reinstall the chipset drivers after swapping CPUs.

    Only then will I know whether Windows needs to be "repaired" for the new processor.
    Is it really so intrinsically embedded that a Windows installation will be picky about a change of processor to a similar processor?
     
  5. bremen1874

    Capodecina

    Joined: 20 Oct 2008

    Posts: 12,048

    No.
     
  6. RampantMark

    Gangster

    Joined: 8 Sep 2019

    Posts: 116

    Location: Lincoln

    That'd be helpful if that's going to work.

    Thanks :)
     
  7. pastymuncher

    Man of Honour

    Joined: 12 Jul 2005

    Posts: 19,407

    Location: Aberlour, NE Scotland

    You can go straight to the latest bios unless the bios notes state that a certain version has to be installed first. You don't have to update every bios version to get to the latest. Same with the drivers.
     
  8. RampantMark

    Gangster

    Joined: 8 Sep 2019

    Posts: 116

    Location: Lincoln

    Reason I mentioned it is that with the Aorus BIOS updates, there are a couple that allegedly, in the notes, require another BIOS to be updated first, and one BIOS update that actually requires an updated chipset driver installation first.