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The nervous wait to exchange....

Discussion in 'Home and Garden' started by noj, 3 Apr 2014.

  1. Hyburnate

    Capodecina

    Joined: 29 Jul 2011

    Posts: 15,296

    Location: Near Northants / MK

    Yeah basically they want to lift the carpets and the flooring to work out if it's causing issues, it's due to a lack of air bricks not providing a cross ventilation to the floor void, the measurements appear to be taken about 10" from the floor.

    This is the excerpt that sort of worries me;

    I would rather not do anything at this stage until the development work happens, what bad can a couple more years do in the grand scheme of things... Plus I'll be taking the carpets and floorboards up anyway and I may be able to have a poke myself and come up with a solution.

    I guess my only concern is, they are finding raised moisture levels in more than one localised area, it's the whole side of the house in several rooms...
     
  2. DRZ

    Soldato

    Joined: 2 Jun 2003

    Posts: 7,020

    Location: In the top 1%

    That middle line could mean pretty much anything! Random intervals rather than any sort of methodical testing could mean the surveyor got three elevated readings within 1m^2 of each other in one patch and again in another patch and then inferred the entire wall is damp. I think in your shoes I would explain the results to the EA and request another viewing - go with your own damp meter (they are inexpensive and useful to have anyway - I've had one for years) and give everywhere a good look. Any signs of a problem worthy of immediate rectification will likely be extremely obvious unless it was decorated pretty recently. Even a lick of paint might not mask significant salt staining or even the smell of damp if it is particularly bad.

    As fastwunz said above, there are things you can look for if there is an issue, like any underfloor ventilation or overflowing gutters. If it has been mistreated/undermaintained and allowed to be wet for an extended period of time (around downpipes, blocked drains, raised beds against the house etc, you get the idea) you'd likely see spalling of the brickwork or failing mortar (or both) on the external side of the area of concern. If the exterior of the wall has been rendered then even the most innocuous looking cracking in the render could (almost certainly will) be allowing rainwater to penetrate and dwell between the render and the brickwork and this absolutely will lead to dampness inside the house.
     
  3. b0rn2sk8

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 9 Mar 2003

    Posts: 9,730

    Aren’t those moisture meters only meant to be used in wood with the relevant chart for the type of wood?

    The thing with damp is that it’s highly likely to be a very simple problem. It’s either water getting in where it shouldn’t be (roof, cutters, bounce back from the floor etc) or water failing to get out (lack of ventilation, drying washing inside etc).

    If there genuinely are damp problems you’ll know it from a visual inspection (smells, staining, condensation, wet exterior walls etc.). Look for any obvious signs of interior redecorating and other thing like ground levels and if the bricks look like they have been repointed/rendered. If it’s been done with cement where it should have been lime, that will cause big problems.
     
  4. DRZ

    Soldato

    Joined: 2 Jun 2003

    Posts: 7,020

    Location: In the top 1%

    Some are, some of the cheap ones can do both wood and brick, some (£50ish level) have tables for all sorts of materials. I have a relatively cheap one at £20 or so (going back a few years now!) which can do wood and brick/concrete and has separate readings for each and although I've now lost it, it had a book with a table for different types of wood and some other materials.
     
  5. Hyburnate

    Capodecina

    Joined: 29 Jul 2011

    Posts: 15,296

    Location: Near Northants / MK

    So the outside of the house where the affect is, is mainly rendered. The roof is all good from a visual inspection, as is guttering. There is an existing extension at the back, and that guttering simply expells water onto a concrete footpath in the garden, that could account for some, but not all of the moisture. I would fix this in the short term with a stihl saw and route the water into the garden :D I'm wondering if it would be best to bring forwards my plans to re-render the backside of the house, a sizeable job but something I think may be necessary.

    Photo for context https://i.imgur.com/cuZl73G.png

    It's the rear bay sort of area/room they have identified the 'moisture', I properly read the document and found this

    The issue I have is, the property is empty/vacant, and I can't secure a viewing for the next two weeks. There were no obvious signs of moisture when I visited and yeah it's not been the most maintained that's for sure. I don't really want to pause things for 2 weeks :(
     
  6. DRZ

    Soldato

    Joined: 2 Jun 2003

    Posts: 7,020

    Location: In the top 1%

    Well, in my view you've already probably saved yourself the cost of a more intrusive survey (which would probably have not said a great deal more anyway) by listing a few things, any of which could cause your issue! Budget for all of it and you might get lucky! Whatever you decide, I would personally recommend steering clear of any damp specialist who also offers any sort of remediation service. They only want to do one thing which is sell you a chemical damp course which is probably useless. Independent specialists DO exist who are not affiliated in any way with any damp-proofing companies and those are worth engaging if you do sort those bits but still have damp...
     
  7. Hyburnate

    Capodecina

    Joined: 29 Jul 2011

    Posts: 15,296

    Location: Near Northants / MK

    Yeah I mean my plan is to extend and put a garage right next to the side of the house with a double storey extension, so it all seems a bit... pointless? I mean I'll end up uncovering the issue then and fixing it then.

    If I was keeping the house as is, it'd be a problem that needed resolving but by this point, what do I do? Where do I even begin negotiating, for context the house is circa 270/280k - this is new to me!
     
  8. a1ex2001

    Capodecina

    Joined: 14 Mar 2005

    Posts: 14,746

    Location: Here and There...

    We negotiated via email with the agent, I listed all the things of concern that our survey turned up and then stated this was going to cost us approx X to remediate which we hadn’t budgeted for in our offer so we would be prepared to continue with the purchase at Y price. Make sure you ask for more off than you actually want as the vendor will come back with a counter offer. Then take it from there always remember the worse that will happen is the vendor will say no they are highly unlikely to cancel the sale and re-list the house. We went back with a second offer in response to our vendors initial offer which we expected to be rejected but we had nothing to loose and they actually said yes. Only other thing I would say is always think about the context you are spending nearly 300k so arguing over £500 looks petty!
     
  9. Hyburnate

    Capodecina

    Joined: 29 Jul 2011

    Posts: 15,296

    Location: Near Northants / MK

    Yeah, I don't really know where to start with how much this could cost to resolve? A few grand? I don't want to take the mick but I think I'm going to have to summarise the issues and go back to them, some of it I had budgeted for, but the fact I now have to build a wall is one of the things I hadn't! :p
     
  10. Matthew-1985

    Soldato

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 5,405

    Is it normal for a conveyancer to ignore you for three weeks? We've been asking for an update on where we are as we think we are near the point of exchange. We've also asked for bank details for sending deposit money but they don't respond. Is this normal? :cry:
     
  11. DRZ

    Soldato

    Joined: 2 Jun 2003

    Posts: 7,020

    Location: In the top 1%

    Sounds like you are emailing them? Get on the phone, ask for an update and if it can't be obtained then and there then ask when it can be reasonably expected. If they fail to meet their own deadline then call them again... Give them one chance to meet their own deadlines and then start to escalate. Eventually you'll get to someone who will be irritated enough at your constant chasing to actually do the work you're paying them for.
     
  12. Invertigo

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 19 Sep 2010

    Posts: 2,255

    Location: Manchester

    So the vendors emailed us this weekend, they're moving abroad and so have asked if we want to push completion up to the next week or 2. No date has been formally agreed yet but the plan was mid January as it suited them, but we've always been open about being able to move whenever (we're moving from a family owned rental so have no notice period or anything), can't see any reason we wouldn't go for this
     
  13. squerble

    Mobster

    Joined: 13 Apr 2009

    Posts: 4,827

    Location: UK

    Our vendors are still being told the 17th for their completion on their new build, though our solicitor is saying she's still outstanding answer to queries she sent from the vendors' solicitor so I'm just trying to brace for the fact our expected completion date of the 17th is going to slip, probably to the New Year.
     
  14. Invertigo

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 19 Sep 2010

    Posts: 2,255

    Location: Manchester

    So all sorted and planned for 15th completion now, getting very excited!
     
    Last edited: 2 Dec 2021
  15. Rabtech

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 27 Dec 2003

    Posts: 1,166

    Location: Preston, Lancs

    Excellent, a nice early christmas present :)
     
  16. casper_uk

    Gangster

    Joined: 7 Oct 2004

    Posts: 324

    Looks like the 10th December is the date. Wasn't much fun sending the deposit over and then looking at my bank balance, all them years saving and gone in the blink of an eye!
     
  17. andy_mk3

    Capodecina

    Joined: 5 Oct 2009

    Posts: 11,674

    Location: Spalding, Lincs

    Good news on that front. And yes it's shocking isn't it? It goes like it's nothing at all.
     
  18. a1ex2001

    Capodecina

    Joined: 14 Mar 2005

    Posts: 14,746

    Location: Here and There...

    Rubbish online company per chance? I’ve been dealing with one appointed by our mortgage company and they are absolutely rubbish!
     
  19. LuckyBenski

    Soldato

    Joined: 28 Dec 2017

    Posts: 6,003

    Location: London

    Going for our first formal viewing tomorrow... We went to visit an auction property a couple of times last week. Buying a house has been on the cards for a while but we've had a turbulent year. Started out with a plan to move in with family (share-own with siblings, been renovating it a few years) then the sibling decided they want to sell and move elsewhere. Then we started looking to buy sooner rather than later and had a significant drop in predicted budget last month.

    Tomorrow ticks all the boxes (even the nice-to-haves) and is in budget without any silly games borrowing off family etc. Let's hope it's as nice in person as it is on paper :)
     
  20. thedazman67

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 24 Apr 2004

    Posts: 2,041

    Location: Warrington, UK

    Our ordeal is still ongoing we've been given an ultimatum from the vendors we are buying off exchange no later than the 15th with completion on the 21st December failure to do so and they will relist the property for sale.

    The problem is our buyer's solicitor taking forever to do anything.

    We've given our buyer's the same ultimatum.

    One stressful week coming up