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Windows 8 In 3 Minutes

Discussion in 'Windows & Other Software' started by Chaos, Oct 26, 2012.

  1. Dano

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Dec 19, 2006

    Posts: 9,384

    Location: UK

    I suppose we should all thank MS for saving us .1% of screen real estate by hiding the start button, I can now use that to display erm... more taskbar...
     
  2. Broken Hope

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Jan 16, 2003

    Posts: 8,743

    Location: Nottingham

    Don't quite understand this, Windows 8 still has a desktop, it just doesn't boot to it by default, only when you open a desktop app.
     
  3. braveheart

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Jan 3, 2007

    Posts: 1,115

    Location: Scotland

    yeah it make me sick and headace as well also too much to do, im stick with windows 7 as i dont like look in win 8 include metro ui that look so plain as i prefer w7 aero glass...
     
  4. bledd

    Don

    Joined: Oct 21, 2002

    Posts: 46,670

    Location: Parts Unknown

    anyone know how to remove apps that are no longer installed from the 'your apps' list, it seems impossible..!
     
  5. Bottle

    Associate

    Joined: Dec 6, 2004

    Posts: 99

    Do you honestly think MS didn't trial the OS with neophyte users during development?! They will have done a LOT of market research and ergonomics/etc. studies on this. Why do we see the same old Luddite reactions every time a new Windows is released?
     
  6. DeathStorm

    Hitman

    Joined: Oct 18, 2002

    Posts: 976

    Location: Eltham

    That doesn't invalidate the point though and in much the same way as testing won't catch all possible bugs.

    Take a normal person, dump them down in Windows 8 and they have no visual indicators of how to get around the OS, why would they go to a corner? This can all be taken care of by taking 5 minutes to explain it and they should be able to happily go on their way (in fact I'd happily argue full screen apps in a sandbox environment for light use will provide a better experience for the average user) but it's bad design that you have to take those 5 minutes.
     
  7. thecremeegg

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Oct 13, 2006

    Posts: 8,035

    Location: Surrey

    The start menu was always in the corner, in windows 7 the minimize screen button was in the corner, the close windows buttons are in the corner....need I go on?

    People will learn, it's how we progress :)
     
  8. DeathStorm

    Hitman

    Joined: Oct 18, 2002

    Posts: 976

    Location: Eltham

    I don't think you've addressed my point though and I've actually seen it happen first hand with other people, they don't go down to the corner because there's nothing there.

    Of course but it's just a shame that this way a lot of people are going to be initially put off something which may benefit them because there's a bit of a nasty learning curve.
     
  9. drunkenmaster

    Caporegime

    Joined: Oct 18, 2002

    Posts: 33,172

    WHile I'm firmly against the, build it for stupid people first, everyone else will have to deal with it, so screw stupid people who can't open e-mail, for people have trouble opening e-mail, they don't tend to e-mail much anyway and I couldn't give a crap about them.

    On the other hand, I feel like its a step forward and backwards, snap to/multitasking has some serious improvements, as do a lot of the things you can do fairly quickly and it feels smooth and neat. However the start/tiles thing seems exactly what I dislike, people who need a picture to show them everything, and frankly if you open the computer and rather than look in a menu, there is a button saying e-mail, I fail to see how that is harder to use than windows 7, infact, its much much easier. Its much cleaner and more obvious than a windows desktop, you can remove everything for a PC illiterate user and leave a huge tile with E-mail on it, a huge box with IE, and get rid of everything else?

    Also frankly being that its designed for tablets to a large degree, someone who has real trouble with computers, a screen where you press the tile that says e-mail is about as easy as it gets.


    Meh, the video is good anyway, I was as 99% of the people on the planet, distrusting of new things. Not really, Win 7 is really just the first windows that, doesn't crash, is stable, does what I want(mostly) and I just didn't feel the need to move on and pay to do so. However the video impressed me a lot, I don't want to read about win 8 and be told tiles are great along with "its for tablets" everywhere. A video that shows a advanced user moving around quickly is far more telling and explanatory to me and has certainly made me consider moving to it.


    One question to anyone that has it, does the multitasking/splitting up screen work with multiple aps, and can it only split up the screen vertically, or could you have a big app open on 2/3rds of the screen, and say the right side split into top and bottom with two small aps as that is the kind of stuff I generally have open all the time.
     
  10. theheyes

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Jan 17, 2007

    Posts: 8,945

    Location: Manchester

    You can only have two. If you need more windowing options it is best to stick to the desktop.
     
  11. Totality

    Mobster

    Joined: Jul 5, 2007

    Posts: 2,571

    Location: NZ

    The testament of a good GUI is not requiring a video to show how to do the basic stuff such as switching between applications or windows, launching them, shutting down, etc.

    If Windows 8 needs hot keys then why not have a button which brings up a list of hot keys like Linux does?!

    The video in the Op shows everything I dislike about the modern UI. Full screen less functional apps and a really convoluted way of switching between apps and open windows.

    The whole point in the name Windows is the fact it has windows! Why did they even keep the same name if its all about full screen apps and not being able to see multiple windows at once on a large screen?!

    Windows 7 - Internet explorer open in a window, Outlook running in a window, whatever else open in a window all the while being able to see the clock, office communicator, spotify, etc all down in the notification area for quick access without losing my current work flow.

    Windows 8 - Internet explorer full screen, switch to mail app, switch to another program, forget what was in IE and have to move mouse to top left and pull down to get app list. Find IE in the app list and click it. Back to full screen IE.

    Yes, in 8 you can work out of the desktop, but MS want to push modern UI as the standard and if you are working out of the desktop you aren't using Windows 8 as designed anyway! So saying windows 8 has a desktop means you aren't actually using windows 8 as MS intended so it has failed.
     
  12. theheyes

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Jan 17, 2007

    Posts: 8,945

    Location: Manchester

    The notion that a good user interface takes zero effort to learn is a complete fallacy.
     
  13. Totality

    Mobster

    Joined: Jul 5, 2007

    Posts: 2,571

    Location: NZ

    I never said zero effort. I said doing the basic stuff by having to research online.

    I have used mac osx, many versions of Linux and iOS, Android devices, etc and have never felt the need to watch basic tutorial videos until I installed windows 8 with its hidden menus and settings.
     
  14. theheyes

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Jan 17, 2007

    Posts: 8,945

    Location: Manchester

    Whether you go online, get shown by somebody or just explore yourself it doesn't really matter. You say Linux gives you a list of hot keys - I don't see how committing them to memory is any different than learning a few tips and tricks from a Windows 8 video?

    OSX makes you sit through videos at first run to show off the new trackpad gestures and scrolling behaviour. Having to be shown something doesn't always mean bad design.

    If anything, Microsoft should be criticised for not showing enough in the out of box experience.