2006 Malaysian Grand Prix - Race 2/18

Man of Honour
Joined
18 Oct 2002
Posts
40,060
2006 Malaysian Grand Prix - Race 2/18

flag.jpg
location.jpg


Click for larger...
 
Last edited:
Man of Honour
OP
Joined
18 Oct 2002
Posts
40,060
2005 Malaysian Grand Prix
Grid and Results



2005 Malaysian Grand Prix Grid

05-grid.jpg



2005 Malaysian Grand Prix Results

05-results.jpg



2005 Malaysian Grand Prix Lap Chart

05-lap.jpg
 
Man of Honour
OP
Joined
18 Oct 2002
Posts
40,060
Current Standings

2006 Drivers Championship.
Code:
[b]Pos	Driver			Nationality	Team			Points[/b]
1	Fernando Alonso		Spanish		Renault			10
2	Michael Schumacher	German		Ferrari			8
3	Kimi Räikkönen		Finnish		McLaren-Mercedes	6
4	Jenson Button		British		Honda			5
5	Juan Pablo Montoya	Colombian	McLaren-Mercedes	4
6	Mark Webber		Australian	Williams-Cosworth	3
7	Nico Rosberg		German		Williams-Cosworth	2
8	Christian Klien		Austrian	RBR-Ferrari		1
Click here for a more in depth view of the Drivers Championship


2006 Constructors Championship.
Code:
[b]Pos	Constructor 		Points[/b]
1	Renault 		10
1=	McLaren-Mercedes 	10	
3	Ferrari 		8
4	Honda 			5
4=	Williams-Cosworth 	5
6	RBR-Ferrari 		1
Click here for a more in depth view of the Constructors Championship
 
Man of Honour
Joined
11 Mar 2003
Posts
10,706
Location
Greenock, Scotland
Cheers mate, don't worry about missing it off last week's thread - the Bahrain link is a bit pants.

I've actually just uploaded a new copy with the Sepang overlay from the first post, it's better than the one I had.
 
Man of Honour
OP
Joined
18 Oct 2002
Posts
40,060
TV Schedule for this weekend.

Malaysian GP on ITV

Live qualifying: Saturday 18 March
0530-0715
ITV3

Qualifying re-run: Saturday 18 March *for wusses*
1310-1505
ITV1

Live race: Sunday 19 March
0600-0900
ITV1

Race re-run: Sunday 19 March *for the same wusses as above*
1545-1830
ITV1

Highlights: Sunday 19 March
2315-0015
ITV1

Highlights: Tuesday 21 March
0435-0530
ITV4
 
Man of Honour
OP
Joined
18 Oct 2002
Posts
40,060
Renault unsure about engine problem

World champions Renault are still unsure about the cause of Giancarlo Fisichella's problems during the Bahrain Grand Prix.

The Italian driver endured a troubled weekend after complaining about a lack of power from his engine during Saturday's qualifying. He struggled in the race too, before succumbing to a hydraulic problem.

Denis Chevrier, Renault's head of trackside engine operations, said the team were still unsure about the reason for the problems.

Fisichella, however, will get a new engine for this weekend's Malaysian Grand Prix.

"We do not yet know the exact cause of the problem but with a power deficit of around 50 bhp, he drove a very impressive race," said Chevrier. "It is important to say the problem was not with the engine itself, rather with a peripheral component that led to a problem with how the engine was operating.

"In order to make a proper diagnosis in the best conditions, we have sent the engine back to Viry to be dyno tested this week with some very high performance diagnostic tools. As the rules allow following retirement, Giancarlo will use a fresh engine in Bahrain."

Chevrier also played down concerns about Fernando Alonso's engine ahead of the Sepang race, one of the hottest of the calendar.

"In actual fact, Bahrain was not as hot as expected, with ambient temperatures around 25°C," Chevrier added. "We will see higher values than that during the European summer. From that perspective, the hot race is still to come.

"However, Fernando ran a normal weekend and stayed within the engine's allocated performance potential throughout the Bahrain weekend."
 
Man of Honour
OP
Joined
18 Oct 2002
Posts
40,060
FIA, GPMA divided on standard ECU

The chances of a final agreement being reached between the manufacturers and the FIA to head off the threat of a breakaway now depend on a deal over standard ECUs in Formula One, autosport.com has learned.

Although a meeting between FIA president Max Mosley, F1 supremo Bernie Ecclestone and representatives of the Grand Prix Manufacturers' Association in Bahrain failed to deliver a final deal to secure F1's future, the situation appears to be edging towards a solution.

An optimistic FIA president Max Mosley said after the meeting: "I would be disappointed if we didn't get the manufacturers sorted in the next few weeks, or even by the end of the month."

There appears to be general agreement about the commercial terms on offer to the teams and there is growing unity over the need to cut costs with future F1 technical regulations.

The manufacturers are even believed to support Mosley's plans to open up a short window of opportunity for entries to the 2008 championship to allow talks to begin about framing the future those regulations.

Mosley said about the entry window: "The world council have got to agree but assuming they do we will start on March 24 and finish on March 31.

"They all understand why now. If we are going to make any adjustments to the regulations we need the three months to do it and we can only do it with people who are in the championship.

"If people in the championship want to discuss them we can do that once they've entered. Or they can not enter, wait and see what the regulations are, and then decide."

However, high level sources close to the negotiations have revealed that there remain major differences of opinion between the manufacturers and the FIA over plans for a standard ECU.

It is understood that Mosley held talks with individual manufacturer representatives over the course of the Bahrain Grand Prix weekend and the one consistent area of concern for each of the carmakers was the standard ECU.

The carmakers are believed to be adamant that they do not want standard ECUs in F1, because they believe it will detract from the technological challenge of the sport, while Mosley believes that standard ECUs are best for F1.

It is understood that Mosley has indicated to the manufacturers that he will not compromise on this issue, however, which looks set to cause some fraught talks in hammering out a deal in the next few weeks.

BMW motorsport director Mario Theissen told autosport.com that he hoped discussions over the technical regulations would be conducted in a sensible manner.

"I don't really see a point in a tough fight," he said. "I think one should sit down and think about what is reasonable, what are the interests of the teams, the spectators and certainly the commercial rights holders, and then go for it.

"In my view, let me first say we support cost cutting but we have to look for a balance. For F1 the balance is that it is the pinnacle of motorsport, and it was the FIA who released last year than the fans wants to see technology, but on the other hand we have to get costs under control."
 
Man of Honour
OP
Joined
18 Oct 2002
Posts
40,060
Raikkonen keeps his options open

A recent visit to Toyota's factory by Kimi Raikkonen's management team indicates that the Finn is keeping his options wide open for next year.

Although Raikkonen has been strongly linked with a move from McLaren to Ferrari next season, sources have revealed that his management team are considering all their possibilities and have certainly not yet discounted other teams from the equation.

Sources have revealed to autosport.com that Raikkonen's managers Steve and David Robertson recently visited Toyota's Cologne factory to look at the facilities and hold talks with the team about a deal for next year.

And although Toyota's poor start to the season will have done little to entice Raikkonen to take a gamble on them, the fact that the Finn is not going to rush into a decision means that the Japanese manufacturer still remain a possibility if they can turn their season around.

Sources claim that Raikkonen is likely to finalise his plans around May, when Ferrari are expected to be informed at the latest by Michael Schumacher about whether he intends to remain with them.

Even though Raikkonen has made it clear that he would happily race as Schumacher's teammate, the seven-time world champion may be reluctant for the team to take on board a driver of Raikkonen's stature.

It is widely believed that Schumacher's contracts with Ferrari guarantee him the number one status at the team, and there would be little reason for him to concede on that point with any new deal.

Reports in the German press today are claiming that Schumacher has already indicated that he wants to remain at Ferrari next year following the successful start to their season.

Should Schumacher commit to Ferrari with no change to his number one status, then that would force Raikkonen to either accept continuing with McLaren or decide to take a gamble on Toyota - which would likely offer him the most money. An outside possibility, however, is a switch to Renault.

McLaren boss Ron Dennis made it clear at the weekend that he would respect Raikkonen's decision if the Finn, or teammate Juan Pablo Montoya, decided to leave his team at the end of the year

"I believe in freedom of choice, but it's a two way street," said Dennis. "The driver is an important part of the team but, at the end of the day, if we chose we could contract a second driver for 2007 tomorrow, just as Kimi or Juan could sign for another team tomorrow.

"If Kimi or Juan thinks their future is best served by driving for another team that's what they should do. If we think our future is best served by contracting another driver for next year - that's what we'll do."
 
Man of Honour
OP
Joined
18 Oct 2002
Posts
40,060
Fisi escapes penalty despite V8 change

Giancarlo Fisichella will have a fresh engine fitted for the Malaysian grand prix, but - unlike Jacques Villeneuve and David Coulthard - he will avoid slipping ten places down the race grid.

In a Renault race preview, the luckless 33-year-old Roman confirmed that his V8 problem in Bahrain - culminating in a loss of about fifty horse power and ultimately a total hydraulics failure - had necessitated a new engine.

But Fisichella, who turned the TV airwaves blue in a fit of live in-car radio frustration during a pit stop, added: 'We know that it was not a problem with the V8 itself.'

F1's rules allow that a fresh engine be fitted for the next event after a car retires - so long as the reason for retirement was not an engine failure itself.

Renault engine boss Denis Chevrier revealed that Fisichella's errant engine had been sent back to Viry (France) for analysis, even if a 'peripheral component' caused the fault.
 
Man of Honour
OP
Joined
18 Oct 2002
Posts
40,060
Malaysia Preview: Super Aguri

Super Aguri now heads to Malaysia for the second round of the 2006 Formula One World Championship following an exciting and eventful debut grand prix for the team in Bahrain.

SAF1 race drivers Takuma Sato and Yuji Ide must now acclimatise to the humid weather conditions when they arrive in Malaysia today. The circuit in Sepang, host to the Malaysian Grand Prix, features wide straights and a mixture of technical and high-speed corners which in combination with the intense heat, is extremely demanding on both driver and car alike.

Takuma Sato: "The SA05 race car had never completed more than 10 laps before we reached Bahrain this weekend. The fact that we were able to finish the race on a challenging track and in tough conditions shows that the car is reliable. Malaysia will be very physically demanding for Yuji and myself as drivers and also for the cars in the heat and humid conditions. We need to continue working hard this week so that we can start to improve in every area, but I was happy with our result in Bahrain today and I am looking forward to another solid race in Sepang next week."

Yuji Ide: "I really wanted to finish my first Formula One race but I did not get the opportunity so I really wish that I finish the race in Malaysia. I have raced in Sepang when I was driving in Formula Nippon and I like the country very much so now I am looking forward to returning there to race as a Formula One driver."

Aguri Suzuki, Team Principal: "I did not really have the time to enjoy our time in Bahrain as everything was so new to me in my role as a Formula One Team Principal, but I was extremely excited to be at the team's first race. At the Malaysian Grand Prix I hope that I will be able to relax and enjoy the race a little more, however we still have so much to learn and many improvements to make and so every single race will be a steep learning curve for us. I cannot wait for the team's second race in Malaysia next week and am very proud of what the team has been able to achieve to this point."
 
Man of Honour
OP
Joined
18 Oct 2002
Posts
40,060
Malaysia Preview: BMW

After the initial stocktaking at the season opener in Bahrain, there's no opportunity for the Formula One teams to catch their breath. The second of 18 races in the FIA Formula One World Championship – the Malaysian Grand Prix – is lined up for this coming Sunday, 19 March. The BMW Sauber F1 Team is looking forward to the home race of its main sponsor and bracing itself for the rigours of a race in tropical conditions.

On Tuesday and Wednesday prior to the Malaysian Grand Prix, drivers Nick Heidfeld and Jacques Villeneuve as well as BMW Motorsport Director Mario Theissen and Peter Sauber will have several PR appearances. For Wednesday, the 15th of March, interview sessions with the media is scheduled for 10:00 am at level 41 of Tower 1 of the Twin Towers in Kuala Lumpur.

Nick Heidfeld: "The Malaysian Grand Prix is unusual mainly for its high temperatures and extreme humidity. Basically I don't have a problem with that. Last year I started from tenth place and made it onto the podium – for me it was one of the most exciting races ever. I had some tough duels and a lot of fun. We have experienced some incredible cloudbursts in Sepang, but I can live with that as I basically enjoy driving on a wet track. So far, I've managed quite well in Malaysia whatever the conditions. I also know the country quite well by now. To get acclimatised I have often taken a brief holiday there before the race, and there has also been plenty on the agenda – that's Malaysia's oil and gas company, who were also our sponsors back in the years when I was driving for Sauber. When you see the Twin Towers in Kuala Lumpur, you get some idea of how important this company is for the country."

Jacques Villeneuve: "Malaysia will be a very busy grand prix for the BMW Sauber F1 Team because it's the home race of our main sponsor . The track is quite interesting and physically very demanding because of its long high-speed corners that generate high lateral g- forces. All this takes place in high ambient temperatures with an extreme humidity, which means that you really need to be physically well prepared. I am confident for the race."

Robert Kubica: "Sepang is another circuit I don't yet know, but after the positive experiences in Bahrain I hope I'll have this race track sussed just as quickly. My aim is, of course, to support the team as best I can, and it will be important for me to clock up plenty of laps and run through the planned schedule completely. The Bahrain race weekend has demonstrated very clearly that it is important to gather extensive data already on the Friday. I have never driven in such an extreme climate as in Malaysia, and so I will also gain valuable experience in that respect. I can't wait to see Kuala Lumpur, and especially the Twin Towers that I've heard so much about. It's going to be another interesting weekend for me in many ways."

Mario Theissen, BMW Motorsport Director: "Having taken initial stock following the first race of the season, we are now looking forward very much to visiting the home of our main sponsor . There can't be many cities as closely associated with a company as Kuala Lumpur, watched over as it is by the Twin Towers. As part of its Asian strategy the BMW Group has raised its involvement in Malaysia, which includes a sales subsidiary, a parts distribution centre and an IT centre. In Sepang the engines have to put up with huge thermal loads, and fuel temperatures also rise to critical levels. Every team prepares for the heat with extra or larger engine air-cooling intakes in the sidepods as well as apertures in the form of slits, flues or exhaust vents. The aerodynamics and engine experts always have to aim for a compromise."

Willy Rampf, Technical Director Chassis: "Sepang is an interesting track with a good mix of slow corners that require optimum grip and fast sections demanding maximum stability. Turns 9 and 11 in particular are tricky, with drivers braking into the corner with heavy lateral g-forces. It means you have to take great care with the car's set-up, which requires a lot of work on the electronics. As a result of the lower output of the V8 engines, the aerodynamic settings have taken on even greater importance. The two long straights allow an opportunity for overtaking, so you have to find the right compromise between sufficient downforce and an optimal top speed. The combination of fairly abrasive asphalt and high temperatures means the tyres are subject to extreme loads."
 
Man of Honour
OP
Joined
18 Oct 2002
Posts
40,060
Malaysia Preview: Toyota

Fresh from the season-opening Bahrain Grand Prix, the F1 circus is now en route to the second part of a challenging double-header. The Malaysian Grand Prix has been held at Kuala Lumpur's Sepang circuit since 1999 and it usually provides the year's hottest and most humid race. Ambient temperatures can reach in excess of 35°C, providing a unique challenge for drivers and engineers alike. Panasonic Toyota Racing's drivers Ralf Schumacher and Jarno Trulli arrive in the Far East hoping for an improvement on last weekend's performance as the team bids to get its 2006 campaign on track. The team's strong performances over the last 12 months show that the potential is there to move back up the grid.

Ralf Schumacher heads to Malaysia looking for signs of improvement after the difficulties of Bahrain.

Ralf Schumacher: "After a disappointing performance in Bahrain we are now heading directly to Malaysia. Of course we will face completely different conditions in Sepang, where both drivers and engineers face the extra challenge of the heat and the humidity. I am going to use two to three days in Malaysia to just get used to the climate there, to work out and be in my best physical shape possible to go to the race. The facilities at the circuit are great, they are state-of-the-art and very beautiful. It's a very fast, wide, swinging track with good overtaking opportunities. I have had some great races there, so I'm looking forward to going back. I hope we can use the data we collected in Bahrain to improve our performance for the second race of the year."

Jarno Trulli took second place last year in Malaysia but his aims are more realistic for this weekend.

Jarno Trulli: "The Sepang circuit is one of the modern breed of F1 circuits, with facilities that are state-of-the-art. Last year's race was my favourite of the entire season, when we were able to take Toyota's first podium. Of course our form in Bahrain suggests that this year's race will be much harder. We were expecting a better start but now we have to work to improve our performance. Of course we cannot change much in time for Malaysia but hopefully we can keep up the learning process with the aim of moving up over the next few races. The new qualifying system has gone down well but we saw in Bahrain how chaotic it can be with all the traffic out at the same time."

Panasonic Toyota Racing heads to the Malaysian GP looking to learn more about its new package.

Luca Marmorini – Technical Director Engine: "Obviously the Bahrain Grand Prix was a major disappointment to everyone in the team because we were not where we hoped we would be. But the season is long and we will be pushing to improve our performance. Sepang may come a bit soon to have any major impact but we have at least collected data from the Bahrain weekend that should help us. The new qualifying system is an interesting new challenge which we enjoyed, so we hope to learn more about that over the next few races. These first two back-to-back races make for a tough start to the year because of the heat of Malaysia, which will be 20°C higher than anything we encountered during pre-season testing. Overall we have to look to these first flyaway races as a learning curve to understand our new package and the new regulations so that we can be ready to have a full package when we go back to Europe."
 
Man of Honour
OP
Joined
18 Oct 2002
Posts
40,060
Malaysia Preview: WilliamsF1

Following a strong showing at the opening round of the season in Bahrain, where both Mark Webber and Nico Rosberg finished in point scoring positions, the WilliamsF1 Team are now looking to maintain the momentum at the second round of the Championship, the Malaysian Grand Prix, to be held at the Sepang circuit on Sunday 19th March. This year's event will be the eighth Grand Prix hosted by Malaysia at the Sepang track, located just south of the country's capital, Kuala Lumpur. The visually dramatic track, with its blend of wide, sweeping corners and fast straights, always promises compelling racing and a contest for both the drivers and the cars given the high ambient temperatures and humidity. Engines in particular will face a severe test having completed one race distance, as well as being new V8 technology.

With the Malaysian Grand Prix falling just one week after Bahrain, Mark Webber, Nico Rosberg and Alex Wurz all headed straight to Kuala Lumpur on Monday. Regarded as one of the most physically demanding races on the calendar, the drivers will spend the days in the lead up to Sepang acclimatising themselves to the high temperatures and extreme humidity common to Malaysia. Nico Rosberg will also be making an appearance on behalf of team sponsor, Oris, the premium timepiece maker, on Wednesday with a visit to the opening of their new store in the country's capital, while Mark Webber will be undertaking some physical humidity training.

Despite Nico Rosberg claiming the fastest lap and team mate, Mark Webber, securing the fourth quickest time of the Bahrain Grand Prix, the FW28 will benefit from several upgrades in Malaysia as part of an aggressive development programme that will continue throughout the season. As such, the team has developed aero upgrades for the cars' sidepods, as well as for the chimney winglets. The cars will also run with several revised mechanical components, all aimed at raising the overall competitiveness of the FW28s for the forthcoming Grand Prix.

A state of the art, purpose-built facility, the fluid design of the Sepang circuit lends itself to challenging racing. Each 5.543km lap of the 56 lap race poses specific technical challenges for the drivers and their engineers as they battle to create a perfectly balanced set-up to contend with the complex mix of corners, high speed directional changes and blisteringly fast straights. Although a characteristically smooth track, Sepang offers little grip so a high downforce configuration will be paramount in the cars' set-up.

As in Bahrain, climatic conditions will undoubtedly come into play this weekend and could potentially cause a lottery outcome in both qualifying and the race. The acute temperatures and high humidity levels, coupled with the constant threat of heavy downpours, will push the drivers and their cars to the limit. The oppressive heat in the cockpit will test a driver's physical and mental fitness levels to the extreme while they suffer an anticipated fluid loss of over a litre per hour during the race itself. The engines, which will be on their second outing, will also be put under intense strain in Malaysia. Although Sepang is not traditionally regarded as a power circuit, the time actually spent at full throttle being relatively low, containing oil temperatures in the drive train, while not sacrificing aerodynamic efficiency, is imperative for engine durability.

Mark Webber: "Malaysia is always a big test for the car and a big test for the drivers. Traditionally, it's a really warm race and the weather can be really inconsistent as well. The circuit is absolutely amazing, there are all types of corners, and it's a track I really enjoy driving a Formula One car on. It's the second race of the year, and I hope we can get another good result after the strong start we made in Bahrain."

Nico Rosberg: "I haven't driven at Sepang before so it's a new circuit I'm going to have to learn quickly, although I will do a few more laps in the practice sessions than in Bahrain in order to prepare myself. I've driven it on the simulator, though, and from that I think it's going to be a track I'll enjoy. It's going to be very hot out there, so it should be a good race for us and, in particular, for our tyres. By the time I get out to Malaysia, I won't have as much time to train as I'd like, and I have a marketing commitment for Oris on Wednesday, so I'll have to acclimatise quickly but I can't wait to get in the car again."

Sam Michael, Technical Director, WilliamsF1: "Malaysia has the highest average annual rainfall of all the circuits we race on, completely opposite to Bahrain, where we have just raced. With ambient temperatures reaching 40°C and high humidity levels, daily tropical thunderstorms are normal at this time of the year. High temperatures have an influence on car set-up, as well as tyre selection, because they usually cause higher degradation in lap times.

"Sepang has three slow speed corners and four straight sections, which reward engine power. There are also low drag levels. It is a challenging circuit for the drivers, with plenty of direction changes through medium to high speed corners. It is also clear from past races that overtaking is possible in a couple of places around the track. We will have a couple of aerodynamic improvements for the FW28 in Malaysia, the updates part of our planned development programme. Bridgestone will bring two different tyre compounds for us to choose from, which have been tested extensively. With the high speed corners, the loading will be quite high on the tyres so it's important to make the correct choice. Our qualifying and pit stop strategy will be interesting now we've seen the results from the new format in Bahrain, and it is bound to spring a few surprises again. We are going to Malaysia aggressively after the excellent performance of the FW28 at the last race and, with our partners Cosworth and Bridgestone, we intend to deliver."

Simon Corbyn, Head of F1 Race Engineering, Cosworth: "The Malaysian Grand Prix is one of the toughest for F1 engines. The high ambient temperatures are at the limit of what we experience during a race season and this places maximum demands on both the engine and car systems. Fortunately, Cosworth and Williams have no significant installation concerns with the CA2006 engine in the FW28 chassis. This year will also be particularly challenging as this will be the first time any of the new V8 engines goes into a second race weekend. Engine reliability will be a significant factor, both in terms of the starting grid line up and the race result in Malaysia."
 
Man of Honour
OP
Joined
18 Oct 2002
Posts
40,060
Malaysia Preview: Honda

Hot on the heels of an encouraging start to the season in Bahrain last Sunday, the Honda Racing F1 Team heads east across the Indian Ocean to Malaysia for the second round of the Formula One World Championship in Kuala Lumpur this weekend. Although the season-opener may not have yielded the results the team had hoped for, it did confirm the competitiveness of the Honda package versus the competition, which leaves the team feeling positive that there are better things to come in Kuala Lumpur on Sunday.

The drivers' rigorous pre-season fitness training will certainly pay dividends here as they contend with the fierce heat and humidity. With track temperatures likely to reach 50°c, and even hotter in the cockpit, the conditions are far from ideal for the drivers but well suited to the team's RA106 race car and Michelin tyres.

Rubens Barrichello: "My first race for the team was disappointing so I hope that Malaysia will be where my season really gets started. The track is one of the best in terms of layout and I think it will suit our package well. There are also some good overtaking opportunities. Obviously it's one of the most physically demanding races because of the heat and humidity but we're well prepared for that. I think we will have a much better race here."

Jenson Button: "Having finished fourth at the Bahrain Grand Prix, which is the highest position we've finished in at the first race of a season, I am really looking forward to showing what we can do at the next race. It's reassuring that we come away from Bahrain knowing that we genuinely have the pace to compete with the other top teams. Our car should work well at every circuit this year but particularly at hot races like Malaysia where the conditions are very well suited to our tyres.

"The Malaysian Grand Prix holds fond memories for me because it is where I achieved my first podium in Formula One. I enjoy racing there as it has a lot of quick, flowing corners as well as some really fast straights. I think we can expect another exciting race this weekend."

Gil de Ferran, Sporting Director: "After an encouraging start to the season in Bahrain, we are hopeful of a good performance in Malaysia this weekend. Certainly the Sepang circuit presents many challenges, this being the second race on our new engines and with the very high track and air temperatures we will encounter. However, we believe that our car and tyres are suited to conditions and we expect to be fighting at the sharp end of the field. After a frantic first taste of the new qualifying format, there is no reason to expect this next session to be any less exciting, but we will definitely be applying lessons learnt in Bahrain."

Shuhei Nakamoto, Engineering Director, Honda Racing Development: "The season-opener in Bahrain gave us a clearer idea of our level of competitiveness compared to the other teams. As we thought, the top teams are very closely matched, and we will need to keep up a high rate of development throughout the season. We will be targeting a better result in Malaysia, to capitalise on the good race pace Jenson showed in Bahrain."
 
Man of Honour
OP
Joined
18 Oct 2002
Posts
40,060
Weather forecast

Friday
Showers
Hi - 34°C / 93°F
Lo - 24°C / 76°F

Saturday
Showers
Hi - 33°C / 91°F
Lo - 24°C / 75°F

Sunday
Showers
Hi - 33°C / 92°F
Lo - 24°C / 76°F
 
Back
Top Bottom