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Bathroom overhead shower extractor fan

Discussion in 'Home and Garden' started by Destination, Nov 9, 2015.

  1. Destination

    Capodecina

    Joined: May 31, 2009

    Posts: 19,272

    I need to replace a bathroom extractor fan in a family members house.
    Do these thing tend to be of similar sizes, the current model looks affixed to the ceiling over the shower.
    I assume there is tubing attached to the top of it, but the fan is dying, and making large amounts of noise which sound like rattling bearings.

    It is linked to the lights and has a set delay for a few minutes after the light goes off, is this a function of the fan itself?

    Which model would people recommend for quietness,, and for simplicity of a straight swap?
     
  2. wazza300

    Caporegime

    Joined: Jul 11, 2009

    Posts: 26,772

    Location: BenefitStreetBirmingham

    they detect moisture don't they and cut in/off?

    ours vents straight through the wall and has an electric cable going to it,i know screwfix sell them
     
  3. Maccapacca

    Don

    Joined: Apr 13, 2010

    Posts: 16,430

    Location: Sunny Sussex

    Have you got a loft? I think the loft fans ducted to the bathroom avoid standard bathroom wiring regs.
     
  4. dholdi

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Apr 21, 2010

    Posts: 1,156

    Location: Preston

    The time delay will be a function of the fan.
    You can also get them with humidity sensors as well.
    These tend to be obviously more expensive
     
  5. Destination

    Capodecina

    Joined: May 31, 2009

    Posts: 19,272

    This is a loft fan, ducted in above the shower.

    Wondering on recommendations on a quiet replacement.
     
  6. Maccapacca

    Don

    Joined: Apr 13, 2010

    Posts: 16,430

    Location: Sunny Sussex

    Anything from vent axia. Lots to suit your budget.
     
  7. Participant

    Caporegime

    Joined: May 13, 2003

    Posts: 30,606

    Location: Warwickshire

    We've got a Manrose MF100T in our loft, which replaced an awful ceiling mounted thing. Recommended.
     
  8. acake

    Gangster

    Joined: Sep 3, 2012

    Posts: 360

    Location: Yorkshire on side of hill

    same here about 50 pounds for the unit and one of the best fans out there at the moment,
     
  9. Destination

    Capodecina

    Joined: May 31, 2009

    Posts: 19,272

    Ah the manrose things are like the ones i have i my own house.
    So i would just use a blank vent panel on the roof, and connect this in line to the ducting, spliting both sides into place.
    Need to get into the loft and see what way the current ducting is, and if i can easily splice it.
     
  10. Destination

    Capodecina

    Joined: May 31, 2009

    Posts: 19,272

    Will give a look also, thx.
     
  11. thenewoc

    Mobster

    Joined: Mar 9, 2012

    Posts: 4,853

    Location: West Sussex, England

    Did the same, replaced an axial type effort which didn't have enough capability to shift air for this "Manrose MF100T In-Line Mixed Flow Extractor Fan with Timer" which shifts about 3 or 4 times the amount. Was able to fit a piece of chipboard between the beams and mount the Manrose upside down so it was close to the ducting which I was able to then cut so the Manrose was then spliced into the middle. Had to buy a separate fan cover for the ceiling and a back draught thing to go inside the ducting so the cold air doesn't blow back into the bathroom.
     
  12. kefkef

    Mobster

    Joined: Oct 18, 2002

    Posts: 3,939

    Location: Somewhere on the Rainbow

    Another vote for the inline back draught shutter. Stops those chilly blasts of air when your relaxing in the bath with a glass of wine....oh, hang on, that was before I had a child, now it just stops the draughts when I have my 5 second shower!

    Vent Axia VASF100 is fairly quiet and has back draught shutter built in.
     
  13. the-evaluator

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Sep 24, 2015

    Posts: 1,545

  14. thenewoc

    Mobster

    Joined: Mar 9, 2012

    Posts: 4,853

    Location: West Sussex, England

  15. bloodiedathame

    Sgarrista

    Joined: May 11, 2007

    Posts: 7,506

    Location: Surrey

    Do some of these vent into the loft, or is it ducted outside from the loft? It's not a great idea to vent moist air into the loft, unless you like being rained on in your attic (had that at the last place I lived). Admittedly the roof probably needed some vent tiles.
     
  16. Kemik

    Mobster

    Joined: Nov 7, 2005

    Posts: 4,724

    Location: Widnes

    You normally need to vent the unit to the roof via a duct.

    My issue is not knowing if I need to replace the unit that is in the bathroom side. Really need to unscrew it all and see what space I'm working with.
     
  17. Participant

    Caporegime

    Joined: May 13, 2003

    Posts: 30,606

    Location: Warwickshire

    Ducted into and through the soffits. Obviously you don't vent into the loft.
     
  18. bloodiedathame

    Sgarrista

    Joined: May 11, 2007

    Posts: 7,506

    Location: Surrey

    We had a heat exchange system in our last place that drew damp air into the loft. Was pretty decent at getting rid of the damp in the house but it was dripping wet in the loft. Couldn't believe it.
     
  19. Destination

    Capodecina

    Joined: May 31, 2009

    Posts: 19,272

    Okay, going to bump this thread, i installed an axia fan, which was recommended here, it was very quiet, it shift the air, and with its timer, the bathroom is always clear of any humidy. It has the blowback thing to stop cold air coming in also.
    It is vented upwards, through the roofspace, and the air expelled through a tile in the roof.

    Now that it is very cold, i am aware of what seems to be condensation building up within the venting ducting.
    I am very concerned that this will drip or indeed run back down into the electronics of the fan itself, and on inspection, there seems to be the start of this happening.

    Is there a way to avoid this, to syphon condensation away from the ducting?
    What would people recommend.
    The ducting is about a metre long, and goes relatively straight up within the roofspace.
     
  20. NickK

    Capodecina

    Joined: Jan 13, 2003

    Posts: 18,066

    Never vent into the roof - you'll just rot the roof as everything just condenses on the cold wood and other fittings, next stop is rotting boards... etc. Always vent out under the eaves or through the wall. Make sure the pipe is on a 2 degree downward angle to the outside of the house so any condensation drips out. Also make sure any pipe-to-pipe gaps are sealed as it will work it's way out via capillary action. If you have a vent pipe vertical.. then the cold condensation will run back down and drip out of the bathroom ceiling vent.

    The electrician told me that manrose are the best out there and that you should really make sure that the fan is as close to the bathroom as possible as it helps the air flow. Mine is actually attached to the wall pipe at the wall.. no biggie but as it's a little axia one it's not high throughput either.