Cable 100m (Will Patch Panels Extend the Range?)

Associate
Joined
12 Jan 2019
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5
Howdy,
I'm looking for clarity on something. I know that ideally for Cat5e we're looking at a maximum of 100m for 1Gbps if connected end-to-end.

Am I right in thinking that if I put a Patch Panel in between source destination (let's say 50m, so halfway) that it's still within the 100m. And I'll get full 1Gbps. Or.. Will a Patch Panel restart that 100m? So, could I have 5 patch panels between a switch and a PC giving me up to 500m?

I'm thinking that's a no because there's no power source on the patch panel. So the ultimate question is do just switches/routers regenerate that signal? So if I wanted 500m between the outside world and a PC that I would need 5 switches?

Thank you all
 
Associate
OP
Joined
12 Jan 2019
Posts
5
Thank you, that's what I was thinking but the Internet does give mixed search results. But I totally forgot about Fibre, so focused on studying Copper and overthinking it.

Thank you so much for clearing that up :)
 
Soldato
Joined
21 Jan 2010
Posts
22,837
Howdy,
I'm looking for clarity on something. I know that ideally for Cat5e we're looking at a maximum of 100m for 1Gbps if connected end-to-end.

Am I right in thinking that if I put a Patch Panel in between source destination (let's say 50m, so halfway) that it's still within the 100m. And I'll get full 1Gbps. Or.. Will a Patch Panel restart that 100m? So, could I have 5 patch panels between a switch and a PC giving me up to 500m?

I'm thinking that's a no because there's no power source on the patch panel. So the ultimate question is do just switches/routers regenerate that signal? So if I wanted 500m between the outside world and a PC that I would need 5 switches?

Thank you all
Your hypothesis is correct - it's a no.

Before switches were relays, which would simply regenerate the signal. Now switches are a bit smarter, so instead of having to route all data via the router, they maintain look-up tables. This makes it more efficient if say, all of the devices at the end of your 500m run were basically communicating with each other, except for access to the internet or other devices located at the end of the 500m run. To do a 500m run, you are better off exploring other medium such as fibre. You can also get ethernet to fibre converters which extend the range without anything more complicated than a set of media converters at each end.
 
Caporegime
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18 Oct 2002
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26,178
Fibre is better because you aren't electrically connecting two locations 500m apart, which are bound to have their grounds at different levels.
 
Soldato
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5 Nov 2011
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Location
Derbyshire
Fibre is better because you aren't electrically connecting two locations 500m apart, which are bound to have their grounds at different levels.

Genuine question as I fully support the answer of fibre BUT how are phone lines exempt from that? That's copper joining multiple earthing points together (assuming there is a mains powered telephone plugged in at the bottom end of each).
 
Caporegime
Joined
18 Oct 2002
Posts
26,178
I don't think there's a path to ground on a phone line, and I'm pretty sure you won't get continuity between one leg of the copper pair and say the power socket on a router/DECT base station/whatever.

Sort of related to the above, there are PoE splitters that cheat quite a bit and will use the 48v DC supply as the +12v output, and then send 36v to the 0v output. The potential difference is 12v so everything works fine until you connect something that is meant to be 0v to something else that actually is 0v.
 
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