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Everest

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Orionaut, May 26, 2019.

  1. Guest2

    Capodecina

    Joined: May 6, 2009

    Posts: 14,831

    I think you should carry your own gear, taking what you need instead of the Sherpas carrying it as its sort of cheating in my eyes.
    It's a mountain so it shouldn't cost almost 10k to climb it, if you want to attempt it then feel free but in the knowing you will probably die if you don't know what you are doing.

    Just thought, can you rock up and attempt to climb it for free by yourself? i.e. Make your own way there, take your own food, tent, oxygen etc.
     
  2. Kenai

    Capodecina

    Joined: Apr 5, 2009

    Posts: 19,200

    Seems one of the Sherpas working this season has bumped that record to 24 summits.

    Looking on the Everest records wiki page, 395 reached the summit on May 16th. That's crazy.

    The youngest person to summit was 13!
     
  3. smallzz

    Gangster

    Joined: Dec 11, 2009

    Posts: 182

    Location: Gateshead

    Although I would never be able to do it and it is an achievement in itself, the unpredictable (even moreso now?) weather and the fact you have to queue makes you wonder why anyone would attempt it given the cirumstances. My boss is an avid climber who is strongly against doing it. It seems to be becoming more of a fashion statement than anything else.
     
  4. jpaul

    Capodecina

    Joined: Mar 1, 2010

    Posts: 10,976

    I thought you were being ironic .. re-posting below - read up on this interesting blog ... Hilary staircase etc
    http://www.alanarnette.com/blog/201...season-summary-record-weather-record-summits/


    but, with such historic information from previous years, yes - it's surprising people still see an asthetic, a self-realisation potential, in this highly commercialised trip,
    remember fewer people have swum the channel.
     
  5. Angilion

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Dec 5, 2003

    Posts: 17,423

    Location: Just to the left of my PC

    That's complete ascents to the summit. Sherpas do partial ascents much more often, including the most dangerous parts. Which part of the snow/ice is safest this year? A sherpa will have been up before to find that out, mark it, place ropes and ladders, etc.

    This part, for example:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Khumbu_Icefall

    A sherpa might do that hundreds of times.

    No, you can't. Not legally, anyway.
     
  6. "andy"

    Capodecina

    Joined: Jun 9, 2005

    Posts: 13,872

    The people saying it's not a big deal are forgetting that many of these people pay all this money and don't even manage to summit. Or lose digits. Or die.

    it's obviously a big deal to them :p
     
  7. Street

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Jan 17, 2005

    Posts: 7,721

    Location: Liverpool

    I noticed that the other day. A lot of the deaths seem to be from Indian or Nepalese based expeditions. You never hear of a death from the likes of Jagged Globe or other Western providers.

    You need a permit which is about £8k and they made it law that any foreign climber in Nepal has to hire a local a Sherpa which is another few £k minimum. There are also other fees and logistical costs which bump it up a lot before you've even started.
     
  8. Guest2

    Capodecina

    Joined: May 6, 2009

    Posts: 14,831

    Does someone actually 'own' the mountain then? If its not private land, how can someone just go charging people to climb it?
    Wouldn't it be like the UK government saying, it costs £20 to enter the lake district area?
     
  9. Kenai

    Capodecina

    Joined: Apr 5, 2009

    Posts: 19,200

    Someone owns everywhere really, whether it's a private individual or a group, a state, a republic etc. etc.

    I'm sure you'd soon find out exactly who if you arrived at base camp with an army and tried to declare it Guest2Land :p
     
  10. Street

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Jan 17, 2005

    Posts: 7,721

    Location: Liverpool

    They'll have officials at designated places checking permits, no permit and you carry on, they'll arrest you. They've had a similar thing in the alps around the Gouter hut for the last few years to restrict access to only people with hut bookings. The Gendarmes actively turn people around if they can't prove they have a booking and fine people that bivvy in certain areas. Technically as well a lot of the Lake District is owned by the National Trust although it is covered by the CRoW act.
     
  11. Yas786

    Caporegime

    Joined: Oct 18, 2002

    Posts: 47,734

    Location: All over the world...

    Nepal owns Everest, along with Tibet and China....
     
    Last edited: May 27, 2019
  12. Wez1984

    Associate

    Joined: Sep 10, 2017

    Posts: 18

    tell em go climb k2 instead
     
  13. Metalface Mark

    Capodecina

    Joined: Dec 26, 2005

    Posts: 15,099

    Location: Paisley

    Climbing elbrus with the team that lost a climber the other day on the North Side, will be interesting to hear first hand what's gone on this year with the crowds.
     
  14. Marvt74

    Capodecina

    Joined: Feb 20, 2004

    Posts: 14,449

    Location: Higher Walton

    I know it's not the most technical climb and it's generally regarded as more of an extreme "hike" than a climb but i think it's still a huge achievement to have made the summit.

    Just like a marathon isn't overly difficult and anyone could do it, but it still feels good to pass that finish line and Everest i imagine is many multiples harder to do!
     
  15. dowie

    Caporegime

    Joined: Jan 29, 2008

    Posts: 47,291

    In theory, yes. You'd potentially get arrested/fined if caught though. How do you propose to get there though without transportation/guides/vehicles... just get a plane to Kathmandu or Lhasa and then track across one of the respective countries with your backpack before even getting vaguely close to the basecamp?

    I mean I (or rather the group I was in) had a permit for basecamp and decided to go a bit further, we didn't get caught, obvs we weren't attempting to reach the summit though.

    Well Nepal and China(Tibet) own it.

    Lots of the Lake District has public roads, rights of way and private land owned by the national trust etc...
     
  16. dowie

    Caporegime

    Joined: Jan 29, 2008

    Posts: 47,291

    I'm not sure it is really, ?I've done some climbing in the past, though my Dad is super keen and I don't think he's ever been interested in it.

    There still exist unclimbed peaks in Central Asia for example, that sort of thing would (IMO) seem to be a nicer achievement than following a big trail of people along fixed lines put in by sherpas etc..
     
  17. Humpty

    Hitman

    Joined: Nov 19, 2003

    Posts: 977

    I used to do a lot of rock climbing and Alpine mountaineering and was always rather dismissive of the Everest set and their desire to get to the summit via what is a relatively easy route in the technical sense. I now realise that my opinion was based entirely on my ignorance and bravado. Even with an expert team, modern equipment and massive finances a summit attempt on Everest is still an astonishing feat of physical and mental endurance and the ratio of fatalities to successful summit attempts is terrifying.
    Seeing the photo that was linked from the OP makes my blood run cold.

    For anyone who is interested, a book that gives a fascinating insight into the realities of an ascent of Everest is Jon Krakauer's Into Thin Air. A brutal, honest and utterly enthralling read.

    There are much harder routes and many other more difficult and dangerous mountains but don't underestimate the achievement of anyone who has made it to the top of Everest.
     
  18. Marvt74

    Capodecina

    Joined: Feb 20, 2004

    Posts: 14,449

    Location: Higher Walton

    Yeah, it's a great book. As mentioned above the film is based on the same events and also an excellent watch. I'd have loved to have seen it in the cinema.
     
  19. jpaul

    Capodecina

    Joined: Mar 1, 2010

    Posts: 10,976

    you can choose to embark on it with the knowledge of the risks associated with the mountain conditions and personal accident, but at the point where you now have this less predictable risk component of crowding , it becomes a catch 22 scenario, I would have to doubt someones sanity to embark on it...... your life in their hands.

    Also, it's the comradeship of having surmounted a summit with a group of friends that's so rewarding, but I don't see how a commercial everest trip delivers that.
    (I need to look up the male to female summit ratio , yes there are male/female individuals that like to 'test' themselves too Messener, Hargraves)
     
  20. Humpty

    Hitman

    Joined: Nov 19, 2003

    Posts: 977

    Thanks for letting me know. I was aware of the film but hadn't realised that it was an adaptation of Krakauer's book. I'll see if I can get hold of a copy.