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Help with shooting fast moving objects

Discussion in 'Photography & Video' started by Clov!s, Oct 5, 2018.

  1. Clov!s

    Capodecina

    Joined: Dec 1, 2011

    Posts: 15,735

    Location:

    Using the Sony A7iii and Tamron 28-75mm i want to get some pictures of me and my dad on our motorbikes but as this is the first time i am attempting this, i need some guidance. :)

    The finished picture i want is us in focus with a nice soft blurred background.

    If you could help me select the correct mode, AF settings etc that would be great.

    Do i need a tripod? What about filters?

    It will be tomorrow lunch time so it may be bright sunshine or it may to torrential rain!

    Thanks. :)
     
  2. sHo0sH

    Mobster

    Joined: Apr 10, 2011

    Posts: 2,740

    Location: London

    Will these bikes be moving? Or literally shots of you on it?

    If stationary it's very easy, I would use aperture priority mode, set to 2.8, then stand far enough back to get a good framing with around 50mm or above - you can use a single shot shutter mode and wide area af should be fine

    If moving it's more difficult and will require more settings. You will probably get better results with a tripod or monopod but you can do it without one. I would again go with shutter priority mode set to about 1/50th to start off with (this will vary on light, speed of target etc and you may want to try slower), but the focus would be on continuous and so will the shutter. You want to the try and match your panning speed with the speed of the bike, and hold your finger down on the shutter release and follow the bike as it goes past, taking multiple shots. You may also need to zoom out a little as the bike approaches, depending on how close to the road you are standing. (Beware if zooming out and holding the shutter release you will also get blur from the zoom from a slow shutter speed)

    This is how I would try to do it, but it is by no means the best way, happy to be corrected by someone who has tried it more than I.
     
  3. Clov!s

    Capodecina

    Joined: Dec 1, 2011

    Posts: 15,735

    Location:

    Thank you for your response, the bikes will be moving, I'd say around 60mph, may be more or less depending on the road.

    The road we have chosen is very wide but the path is roughly 1.5 metres away from the road so the 75mm should be ok for that.

    I have a tripod I can use with a rotating head so at least if I follow the bike while shooting, it'll be a smooth movement.

    It just means I can't go out on my bike because the tripod is too awkward for me to carry while on my bike.
     
  4. sHo0sH

    Mobster

    Joined: Apr 10, 2011

    Posts: 2,740

    Location: London

    Just expect a high miss ratio on this one!

    Another way if you want to try without the tripod is to use the camera strap - put it behind your neck then hold out so the strap is taught, it gives you a lot more stability - you can use the screen on the back to see rather than the evf
     
  5. AndyCr15

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Apr 28, 2011

    Posts: 7,618

    Location: London, UK

    Not that I'm particularly experienced in this, but I would prefer the strap method over a tripod for this. As the bike passes, you're turning quite quick to try and keep it in the middle of the frame. I would also suggest, you generally need to try and aim the lens slightly ahead in order for it to end up with the bike quite central :)
     
  6. Clov!s

    Capodecina

    Joined: Dec 1, 2011

    Posts: 15,735

    Location:

    That's a good idea actually as it saves me trying to carry the tripod around! I expect it to take me ages to get it right! :p
     
  7. Clov!s

    Capodecina

    Joined: Dec 1, 2011

    Posts: 15,735

    Location:

    That's true, i bet the first few goes i'll either get the background in focus or the whole image will be one big blur :p
     
  8. sHo0sH

    Mobster

    Joined: Apr 10, 2011

    Posts: 2,740

    Location: London

    How did you get on?
     
  9. Clov!s

    Capodecina

    Joined: Dec 1, 2011

    Posts: 15,735

    Location:

    ****, ended up not bothering as it's rained heavily all day :( tomorrow is supposed to be better but I'm working so probably go out on my own and get some landscape images instead. :)
     
  10. The_Abyss

    Sgarrista

    Joined: May 15, 2007

    Posts: 9,407

    Location: Ipswich

    Rain would have been good, as the spray from the tyres and gear, beading on visor etc looks great. It sounds like you're very close to the bike, so you're going have to be at the wider end of that focal length and will need a slower shutter. I'd imagine that hand held on the Sony would be fine - I haven't used mine for any panning action shots yet but you can shoot such slow stills that it feels possible.

    Below was 1/100 at 150mm f/10 (at the top of Grimsel Pass ;) )

    [​IMG]
     
  11. Clov!s

    Capodecina

    Joined: Dec 1, 2011

    Posts: 15,735

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    What lens was that taken with? What would you have to do to get it more in focus?
     
  12. The_Abyss

    Sgarrista

    Joined: May 15, 2007

    Posts: 9,407

    Location: Ipswich

    I think that was a 70-200. I suppose a shorter shutter speed would bring more into focus, but the helmet is the focal point and is fine.
     
  13. Clov!s

    Capodecina

    Joined: Dec 1, 2011

    Posts: 15,735

    Location:

    The helmet is still not as in focus as it could be though when zooming in, when viewing on my monitor anyway.
     
  14. The_Abyss

    Sgarrista

    Joined: May 15, 2007

    Posts: 9,407

    Location: Ipswich

    In that case, it just needed to be a better shot!