1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

I’ve installed Ubuntu

Discussion in 'Linux & Open Source' started by HoneyBadger, Sep 23, 2017.

  1. HoneyBadger

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Aug 2, 2016

    Posts: 1,847

    Location: 127.0.0.1 [Kent]

    Now what?!?

    I’ve setup a Win10 x64/Ubuntu dual boot. Configured boot order, installed Google Chrome, Open Office and a couple of other bits (on Ubuntu) - now what?

    I’m a sysadmin by trade, so any app recommends, particularly system tools, tinkering and what not.

    I haven’t had much exposure to Ubuntu or *ix at all but ready to learn.
     
  2. Steveocee

    Mobster

    Joined: Nov 5, 2011

    Posts: 3,949

    Location: Derbyshire

    Try doing whatever you normally do but with Ubuntu. You’ll be pleasantly surprised how easy you can transfer over.
     
  3. AmateurExpert

    Gangster

    Joined: Aug 7, 2017

    Posts: 345

    Location: location location

    Ubuntu is nice to start with as you can do most things without having to tweak, configure or build - just get things done with GUI applications to start with, and gradually get deeper into learning and managing the system. If you're a novice, the Ubuntu forums are a good place to start, but when searching stuff from Stack Exchange in the results tends to be quite useful.

    OMG Ubuntu has some useful articles on it for beginners, such as this one - in particular, as you have an Nvidia graphics card, you'll want to make sure you've installed the proprietary driver. That article should be enough to get you started, but off the top of my head these are my suggestions for other things to look at:
    • Experiment with different text editors (command line and GUI) - if you like something similar to Notepad++, try Notepadqq.
    • Have a nose around /var/log to see what crops up in what log file.
    • Bookmark commandlinefu.com
    • You'll probably want to know how to search for files on the command line at some point rather just use a GUI - useful for scripting and whatnot
    • If you're a sysadmin, you'll want to dive into shell scripting - Bash is the usual interactive shell in Ubuntu and I find great for scripting. I learnt shell such a long time ago I used a book (this actual real dead-tree edition) to learn.
    • System tools - lm-sensors (should be OK with your motherboard, but if you're missing anything you might need a more recent kernel)
    • If you want to set up a firewall - start with UFW rather than going straight into iptables.
    I think LibreOffice is more up to date regarding features than OpenOffice, but of course very similar.
     
  4. HoneyBadger

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Aug 2, 2016

    Posts: 1,847

    Location: 127.0.0.1 [Kent]

    Thank you for the comprehensive reply!
     
  5. opethdisciple

    Capodecina

    Joined: May 18, 2010

    Posts: 16,276

    Location: London

    The latest update to Ubuntu 17.10 is really nice!
     
  6. Hades

    Capodecina

    Joined: Oct 19, 2002

    Posts: 19,583

    Location: Surrey and London

    Is this the release where they nice from Unity to gnome? I must try it at some point. I moved from Ubuntu to Mint when they introduced Unity.
     
  7. opethdisciple

    Capodecina

    Joined: May 18, 2010

    Posts: 16,276

    Location: London

    Yep.

    It's a big improvement in my opinion. OS is nice and snappy now. Much much better.

    There is a way to get the OS to push it out to you automatically making it easy to update.

    After the football I'll fire up my PC and show you how.

    ---

    To get new version pushed out to you automatically as an when Ubuntu release then do the following:

    1. Open up 'Software & Updates'

    2. Go to updates tab

    3. Notify me of a new Ubuntu version - Change this too: "For any new version"

    After this, run the Software updater and you should get a pop up for the new 17.10 version.
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2017
  8. LabR@t

    Soldato

    Joined: Nov 30, 2005

    Posts: 7,442

    use fedora :)
     
  9. pete910

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Oct 3, 2013

    Posts: 2,131

    FTFY :p
     
  10. TheSkateyBird

    Hitman

    Joined: Apr 4, 2011

    Posts: 707

    Location: Ashford, Kent

    FTFY ;)

    On another note, welcome to Linux OP. Enjoy :)
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2017
  11. Schnippzle

    Mobster

    Joined: Oct 9, 2006

    Posts: 3,748

    Location: here

    My preferred distro :)

    @op Welcome to the Linux community
     
  12. Th0nt

    Soldato

    Joined: Jul 21, 2005

    Posts: 5,264

    Location: N.Ireland

    Using Linux Lite but thats because I installed on a disgarded laptop with a spare Solid state drive. On an old desktop I tested a few and preferred mint over ubuntu at the time. Trouble is I get taken away from actually using the machines as my main desktop - must break the habit!
     
  13. Steveocee

    Mobster

    Joined: Nov 5, 2011

    Posts: 3,949

    Location: Derbyshire

    Been using Ubuntu for years now but just made the cut over to Gnome desktop in anticipation of 18.04 (I only use LTS). It feels so much better and like it is supposed to feel this way.
     
  14. bhawani

    Associate

    Joined: Nov 4, 2017

    Posts: 1

    Location: India

    Use CentOS for speed.
     
  15. opethdisciple

    Capodecina

    Joined: May 18, 2010

    Posts: 16,276

    Location: London

    Centos doesn't look half as pretty. It's not for home/desktop users.
     
  16. opethdisciple

    Capodecina

    Joined: May 18, 2010

    Posts: 16,276

    Location: London

    I've just noticed that out of the box Ubuntu doesn't have it's firewall turned on!

    Personally feel this is bad practice.

    Linux or not noob end users will have no scooby doo this is off and browse away.
     
  17. memyselfandi

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Oct 10, 2005

    Posts: 8,173

    Location: Nottingham

    Most of them are NATed behind a router so it really isn't that much of a big deal in the real world as it's not as if they are going to have lots of ports forwarded through to them.

    Installed Ubuntu 17.10 on a Dell SFF desktop earlier (i5/8GB) with an SSD and BD drive upgrades. Runs an X desktop rather well over all with a couple of docker containers thrown in for a couple of tasks. Did find it a bit irritating that the installer wasn't able to create a custom LVM configuration (although it was possible to work around the limitation).
     
  18. Steveocee

    Mobster

    Joined: Nov 5, 2011

    Posts: 3,949

    Location: Derbyshire

    Really not an issue for most people. Who puts a public IP on a home desktop?
     
  19. AmateurExpert

    Gangster

    Joined: Aug 7, 2017

    Posts: 345

    Location: location location

    That was my initial thought too. It can be helpful as one of your security layers providing it's set up (and maintained) correctly; the defaults on UFW are secure, though Ubuntu has no ports open by default anyway.

    I'd recommend turning it on (there's also a GUI frontend available), and tailing the ufw.log; if it stays empty, then congratulations at least this part of your life is uncomplicated :p.

    For anyone interested, here's a discussion about why it's not on by default (askubuntu.com).

    Were you using the desktop or server image? I think the Ubuntu Server installer supports LVM configuration, but not used it recently myself.

    True. Though one might be on a laptop and have to use an untrusted WiFi LAN - though a VPN is highly recommended here, it's also good to have another defence should something go wrong with the VPN software or configuration.
     
  20. memyselfandi

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Oct 10, 2005

    Posts: 8,173

    Location: Nottingham

    Desktop as the machine I was installing is running as a desktop. Yes if I had used the Server installer then I think it is possible but that doesn't seem to be the case with the Desktop.

    For reference the work around is to boot off the media to the try it out live environment and use that to configure the disk setup before starting the installer. The installer is then able to make use of the, already configured, LVM configuration using the custom settings interface to assign mount points to the already configured logical volumes.

    Regarding firewalls, yes they are a good idea as part of defense in depth but for the average home user sitting behind a NAT router it isn't as big a problem as some make out as the system is not directly exposed to the internet.