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Mirror lock up mode

Discussion in 'Photography & Video' started by Merlin5, Jul 31, 2020.

  1. Merlin5

    Capodecina

    Joined: Aug 17, 2009

    Posts: 15,398

    Location: Finchley Central, London


    I do have a tripod, yes. Would that affect the ISO?
     
  2. Raymond Lin

    Capo Crimine

    Joined: Oct 20, 2002

    Posts: 65,544

    Location: Wish i was in .Lethal's house

    You can then use the base ISO with a tripod.
     
  3. Merlin5

    Capodecina

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    Posts: 15,398

    Location: Finchley Central, London

    Ah. How does that work then?
     
  4. Raymond Lin

    Capo Crimine

    Joined: Oct 20, 2002

    Posts: 65,544

    Location: Wish i was in .Lethal's house

    Turn the dial into Av, then control the aperture, and set ISO to 100. One of the top small buttons by the Top LCD, press the ISO one, then turn the dial to change from auto to 100.
     
  5. Merlin5

    Capodecina

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    Posts: 15,398

    Location: Finchley Central, London


    Oh yeah I know that, I meant, why does putting it on a tripod mean using a lower ISO. But the penny has dropped! I guess you mean no camera shake, so I can use slower shutter speed which lets more light in and so lower ISO, right?
     
  6. Raymond Lin

    Capo Crimine

    Joined: Oct 20, 2002

    Posts: 65,544

    Location: Wish i was in .Lethal's house

    Yes, you can now open the shutter for hours !
     
  7. Merlin5

    Capodecina

    Joined: Aug 17, 2009

    Posts: 15,398

    Location: Finchley Central, London

    I see. Very interesting! :) So let's say I'm taking the same photos of things in my kitchen at around 11pm. I'm on a tripod, I'm at base ISO and say, f4. What shutter speed might I use to get minimal noise on the image similar to base ISO during daylight on a faster shutter speed?
    Anyway, I'll experiment with that.
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2020
  8. danoliver1

    Mobster

    Joined: Aug 24, 2005

    Posts: 3,070

    Location: MANC-chester

    Best thing I ever bought for indoor photography was a hotshoe flash. Just bounce it off the ceiling and you get sharp pictures ever time.
     
  9. Merlin5

    Capodecina

    Joined: Aug 17, 2009

    Posts: 15,398

    Location: Finchley Central, London

    That's one accessory I've not thought much about. I've always thought photos using flash look awful and harsh and flatten an image, but that's on my phone. I'm guessing bouncing it like you suggested won't make it look like a flash has been used? Can you recommend a particular one to buy?
     
  10. danoliver1

    Mobster

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    Location: MANC-chester

  11. Merlin5

    Capodecina

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    Posts: 15,398

    Location: Finchley Central, London

  12. danoliver1

    Mobster

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    Location: MANC-chester

  13. mrgubby

    Mobster

    Joined: Oct 21, 2002

    Posts: 4,885

    Location: 30 miles north of London

    Also remember that when shooting distant objects the air itself is "dirty" and the warmer the day is the "dirtier" the air gets. This can really screw up the quality of the shot :(
     
  14. Energize

    Caporegime

    Joined: Mar 12, 2004

    Posts: 28,220

    Location: London

    You're never gonna get a sharp looking photo at a 100% crop, that's not really how camera sensors work. That above image is so cropped it's only 1.6mp which even 20 years ago would be crap.
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2020 at 5:14 AM