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Planning - Neighbour Objecting

Discussion in 'Home and Garden' started by PaDE, Jul 3, 2020.

  1. PaDE

    Gangster

    Joined: Mar 20, 2015

    Posts: 201

    Side extension comprising of garden room downstairs, two bedrooms upstairs and an office in the loft.

    The issue appears to be the loft dormer overlooking their garden and over development. Our architect seems to think if we pushed we would win due to the angle of both houses plus we are end house mostly overlooking a main road.

    We are most probably going to submit second drawings as a show of goodwill, but was wondering "in case" we don't, if anyone has gone to appeal and won re: neighbour objecting due to over development.

    We spoke to all our neighbours prior to submitting to planning. Its a shame nothing was mentioned then.
     
  2. Firestar_3x

    Caporegime

    Joined: Mar 11, 2005

    Posts: 30,275

    Location: Leafy Cheshire

    Seems like a reasonable objection, like you plan to do i would take it onboard and change the design.

    Last thing anyone wants is to fall out with a neighbor, simply not worth the potential problems and/or money, also they might turn out to be nutters.
     
  3. b0rn2sk8

    Soldato

    Joined: Mar 9, 2003

    Posts: 5,840

    The thing is, just because they have objected doesn't mean the council will reject it too. Have you had any issues raised by the council themselves?

    The last thing you want is to compromise the design if you don't need to.
     
  4. Dis86

    Capodecina

    Joined: Dec 23, 2011

    Posts: 24,378

    Location: Northern England

    Why would you want a dormer overlooking someone elses house and a main road? Put some loft-lights in. That way your neighbours objection goes away and you still get the daylight. Also probably cheaper.
     
  5. Zefan

    Don

    Joined: Jan 15, 2006

    Posts: 29,708

    Location: Tosche Station

    The amount of additional usable floor space with dormers vs your solution is almost always significant.
     
  6. Dis86

    Capodecina

    Joined: Dec 23, 2011

    Posts: 24,378

    Location: Northern England

    Almost always is a big claim - it definitely needs to be quantified in this case. For example, on my upper floor dormers would gain me no additional usable floor space.
     
  7. mattx2

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Jul 21, 2005

    Posts: 1,213

    Location: New York

    Use frosted glass either full or bottom half that way still get the light and might put the neighbor's mind at ease.
     
  8. Zefan

    Don

    Joined: Jan 15, 2006

    Posts: 29,708

    Location: Tosche Station

    It isn't a big claim, it's based on the pitch of most roofs. I assume you must have a rather non-standard roof pitch.
     
  9. Dis86

    Capodecina

    Joined: Dec 23, 2011

    Posts: 24,378

    Location: Northern England

    Nope, I just have a tall house where the loft-space has vertical walls.
     
  10. Zefan

    Don

    Joined: Jan 15, 2006

    Posts: 29,708

    Location: Tosche Station

    So you're arguing that because you wouldn't benefit from a dormer - due to the fact that you live in a house where one wouldn't actually be possible - that they are pointless?
     
  11. Dis86

    Capodecina

    Joined: Dec 23, 2011

    Posts: 24,378

    Location: Northern England

    No, please could you show where I've said that? I'm arguing that it needs to be qualified whether or not it gives an advantage vs the alternative.
     
  12. Zefan

    Don

    Joined: Jan 15, 2006

    Posts: 29,708

    Location: Tosche Station

    It sounds like what you're saying to me based off your rejection of the mere idea of a dormer. I'm pretty sure OP knows their own situation well enough to have considered maybe not spending well over the odds for something they don't want or need.
     
  13. Dis86

    Capodecina

    Joined: Dec 23, 2011

    Posts: 24,378

    Location: Northern England

    Having worked as a consultant in building design I can assure you that's often not the case. Clients often have a firm image of what they want regardless of the practicality, cost or constructability.
     
  14. Zefan

    Don

    Joined: Jan 15, 2006

    Posts: 29,708

    Location: Tosche Station

    Having worked as a consultant in building design I expect you're familiar with the average UK roof pitch, which is "almost always" of an angle that means non-dormer conversions result in a significant amount of wasted floor space. I say this as someone who plans to do a non-dormer conversion in the future, I'm not some dormer fanboy.
     
  15. Dis86

    Capodecina

    Joined: Dec 23, 2011

    Posts: 24,378

    Location: Northern England

    You cannot take averages in to consideration. You need the exact building details. It's an office that he's looking to put up there - is the potential floor-space that you're assuming is created by the dormer essential for this?
     
  16. Zefan

    Don

    Joined: Jan 15, 2006

    Posts: 29,708

    Location: Tosche Station

    I'm not saying the OPs requirements aren't important, I'm answering your question. Your question was "why would you?" rather than "why do you?". I don't see a way of interpreting this other than that you don't know of any reason why someone would want to have a dormer in this person's case. I answered with the main reason why people go for dormers as opposed to loft lights.
     
  17. Dis86

    Capodecina

    Joined: Dec 23, 2011

    Posts: 24,378

    Location: Northern England

    Fair enough. You're right that it could have been phrased differently.
     
  18. NVP

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Sep 6, 2007

    Posts: 7,568

    So... what's a dorma?
     
  19. ANDARIAL

    Soldato

    Joined: Oct 19, 2002

    Posts: 6,276

    Location: Woolyback Country

    This sounds like a good compromise
    Run it past your neighbour :)
    Or put in one way glass.Looks like a mirror from outside and you get `clear` view from inside (not quite clear)
     
  20. Jez

    Caporegime

    Joined: Oct 18, 2002

    Posts: 32,304

    Everything else here has ignored this post gone off on a tangent which isn’t relevant to this application.

    it doesn’t matter what your neighbours think, the council may only refuse the application by material reasons which contradict planning policies.

    Ignore the fact that the neighbours have objected and deal with the council only, they are usually very good and will be in touch if there is going to be a reason for refusal. They will detail the actual policy and provide advice as to why it did not meet it. They’ll usually then give you the opportunity to withdraw the application before refusal for tweaking and resubmission. (You’ll see a lot of “withdrawn” and then subsequently granted applications if you trawl the public access systems)

    Perhaps I’ve been lucky but my experience is that the councils are there to guide and help you pass things while working with their framework. Usually around here (Oxon) you wouldn’t even submit an application until they have effectively granted it verbally through pre planning. Neighbour objections are rarely ever a consideration as they rarely address actual policies.