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Platypus' Beginners Guide to Running

Discussion in 'Sports Arena' started by platypus, Mar 26, 2007.

  1. jsmoke

    Soldato

    Joined: Jun 17, 2012

    Posts: 7,063

    That's me getting the lungs back, impressed at how short a time it's taken. Another 3k tonight, not that fast but lungs are handling it ok. I thought it would take weeks, goes to show. Really just the 'why am I doing this' problem now although nothing like running to get you buzzed.
     
  2. Marvt74

    Capodecina

    Joined: Feb 20, 2004

    Posts: 12,123

    Location: Chorley

    Manged to get 2 runs in this weekend. Was going to aim for a longish run around 13 miles but ended up doing 2x 9 mile runs.

    Felt really good on both runs and today’s ended up picking the pace up for the last mile as I was already near home so couldn’t really extend the distance. Even on hills I felt like I was going faster than usual.

    There’s definately a benefit to running later on in the day when my body is loosened up as opposed to first thing in the morning.
     
  3. Daaaavvveee

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Nov 28, 2015

    Posts: 1,136

    Location: Bishops Cleeve, UK

    I did 9 miles today also, I was going to do it Saturday but went to the national running show instead - Wasn't keen and left after 45 mins.
    I am nearly back up to my normal pace, I think having races booked and training plans ensures that you keep on track of the running.
    I think I may just keep booking events every 3-4 months so i always have to train.
     
  4. Marvt74

    Capodecina

    Joined: Feb 20, 2004

    Posts: 12,123

    Location: Chorley

    Looks like I beat you on the distance leaderboard by 0.1mile :p
     
  5. Ian_Eb

    Hitman

    Joined: Oct 17, 2002

    Posts: 805

    Location: Congleton, Cheshire

    My leg is finally looking less like i have been in an RTA and with luck I might be able to go out again soon :-/
     
  6. Marvt74

    Capodecina

    Joined: Feb 20, 2004

    Posts: 12,123

    Location: Chorley

    Yes, it definitely helps focus the mind. I've felt gains so far in 2019 from upping weekly distance from ~15m to ~25m.

    I'm not following a specific plan but am aiming for alternating weeks up to the marathon

    Week 1 - 2 - 3 short runs (around 4 miles), plus 2x runs around the 8-9 mile mark
    Week 2 - 2 - 3 short runs and then a long run. Increasing distance from 12ish with the aim being to hit around 18-20 in mid March Then taper down to the Marathon in April

    Obviously cutting down if i feel it's needed.
     
  7. Marvt74

    Capodecina

    Joined: Feb 20, 2004

    Posts: 12,123

    Location: Chorley

    Also one thing that i'd found has really helped, that might be useful for any other beginners.

    On the downhill sections. I've always tried to slow myself down, thinking that too much pace would put a lot of force onto joints and cause injury. I mentioned this when i was having a sports massage a few weeks ago and was told this was a bad idea as you end up over loading your quads and it's better to just let your body do what it wants to do.

    Since factoring this in, i've had less pain in my legs and obviously slightly faster times.
     
  8. Blackvault

    Mobster

    Joined: May 5, 2004

    Posts: 3,801

    Location: Northern Ireland

    I've heard this too, let your body flop down, is the way someone told me.

    I broke my elbow today after slipping on ice, so that's my running curtailed for a bit. Shame as I have a 10km on the 2nd.
     
  9. The Darkness

    Hitman

    Joined: Nov 5, 2004

    Posts: 729

    Location: Herts

    Conversely, I run better first thing in the morning (or at least an hour after porridge!). I'm usually tired in the evening and it always feels like hard work.

    2 x 9 miles is very nice work for a weekend; sounds like training is working well.

    Its time for me to extend my long run at the weekend in prep for my april marathon. I must admit I don't really enjoy the 20+ milers....

    Cheers
     
  10. Marvt74

    Capodecina

    Joined: Feb 20, 2004

    Posts: 12,123

    Location: Chorley

    Yeah, when i say mornings i'm pretty much

    Wake up
    Get dressed
    Eat a banana and let the dog out in the garden
    Jump in car and drive to the gym
    Run along the canal by the gym
    Get back to gym, stretch off/do some weights
    Shower
    Head to work

    So about 15 mins from getting out of bed to starting to run and no real time for my body to warm up. Might start trying to get up a bit earlier and eat a little more and do some flexibility work. Problem is i'm already getting up at 5.30 so earlier than that will kill me!


    Feeling quite good today too. Was expecting more aches after 2 longish runs. Both my ankles are a little tender but muscle wise i'm good.
     
  11. D.P.

    Caporegime

    Joined: Oct 18, 2002

    Posts: 29,962

    You definitely don't want to fight against gravity to hard, especially if the gradient is moderate so the faster pace is manageable and the increased forces not too severe.
    You should also not force yourself to go faster down the hill unless you particularly want to. Running faster down a hill will increase impact forces, so best just let gravity do the work and go with the flow. Use the downhills to recover a little.

    Of course, this isn;t a hard rule and running downhill faster can eb sued as part of training. If you run harder down a hill it will increase loading on the quads and you will tend to get some bad DOMs for a few days. Do this repeatedly and you slowly build up some better muscle conditioning to protect against eccentric muscle loading. This is useful for hilly marathons or trail runs.

    Yesterday at the end of my run I ran the last mile quite faster on a long moderate downhill, got down to around 5:30 a mile, although a few tight turns meant the lap pace was a little slower in the end. Was good to get some higher turnover.


    On stepper downhills you want to be careful because the impact forces increase quite a lot. The same idea applies, don;t try and fight gravity too much but it get challenging on a technical rocky trail.
     
  12. D.P.

    Caporegime

    Joined: Oct 18, 2002

    Posts: 29,962



    Evenings don;t work at all for me. I may be tired in the morning but after a mile i am really in the mood. And it is much more motivating running into a sunrise.
    I also like the fact that you can spend the rest of the day slowly working out your muscles and loosening them up. If you run in the evening and go to bed soon afterwards then muscles will be extremely stiff.

    The other thing is simply planning and ensuring you have time to run.If you run early then there is less chance of any work or unexpected meetings/family crisis creeping in. Nothing worse than hoping to do a run and then your boss asks for a document at the last minute or kid gets sick and you have to pick them up form school.


    ------


    I love Long runs, but I can be somewhat apprehensive about them. It helps to be nice and fresh, so no hard workout the day before, go to bed earlier, no alcohol night before. Eat a bigger carb filled breakfast, have a nice treat like donuts. Don't think about running 20 miles, break it up into smaller chunks of 4 to 5 miles, these are stages of the LR and you will feel slightly differently through each stage. Make those first 4-5 slower than your easy pace runs, more of recovery pace. A gentle warmup that just ticks off a few miles. You should then feel really good and fresh, if you don;t then do another 3-4 very slow miles. Then in the next stage speed up each mile so you end up running at your regular easy pace to slightly faster. You want to hold that pace for 8+ miles then you can think about how strong you feel and how hard you want to push yourself. If you are suffering massively then just call it quits and finish on 16 miles or whatever without breaking yourself. If you feel good enough then try and progress those miles, start taking 10 seconds off a mile. Keeping progressing slightly until say mile 18 or 19 then relax back down to easy pace to finish off.

    The easy start should see you over the miles without issue. The change in paces at each stages helps the miles tick by. The progression at the end builds mental strength and endurance, simulates a marathon and makes the miles go quicker when you feel bad.

    If you easy pace in 9min/mile then the first quarter could be at 10 minute pace, perhaps starting at 10:20 and ending up 9:30. Then speed up to 8:45 to 9:00 pace for the middle. Then if strong working down to 7:45 a mile, maybe 7:20 or so penultimate mile, then back at 9 for the last mile cool down and flush legs.
     
  13. Squid Vicious

    Hitman

    Joined: Feb 15, 2015

    Posts: 833

    I'm looking forward to running this year as I've been getting back into things over the last 6 months or so after a fairly long break, and as such have had the benefit of seeing some nice improvements in my speed and stamina - which I find to be really good motivation!

    Worked up-to my first half marathon distance (in recent times) just before xmas so want to start working towards and achieve a full marathon this year. I'm not yet following any particularly structured training plan, just something loosely based on the one I'd used when I first trained for a half marathon (ten years ago), generally 3 to 4 shorter runs, with a couple of those being some form of intensity training and one longer run each week - increasing speed, endurance and distance each week.
     
  14. Marvt74

    Capodecina

    Joined: Feb 20, 2004

    Posts: 12,123

    Location: Chorley

    Forced myself up and out this morning in the cold. Had left my hat at work so my head was freezing. Plus when i finished i noticed ice had formed on my headphones. That can't be good!

    Was intentionally keeping it nice and slow as was conscious of ice but it felt nice being out (once i'd warmed up), only issue was the dark and the fog meant my head torch wasn't very effective.
     
  15. The Darkness

    Hitman

    Joined: Nov 5, 2004

    Posts: 729

    Location: Herts

    Lol no, ice on headphones cant be good! It will be light in the mornings again soon enough. I tend to cycle commute all year and usually by mid Feb its light both ways (6am - 6pm).
     
  16. Ian_Eb

    Hitman

    Joined: Oct 17, 2002

    Posts: 805

    Location: Congleton, Cheshire

    That's what I am really waiting for. I can't be doing with the cold and the dark at the same time!
     
  17. iMacMart

    Capodecina

    Joined: Jun 8, 2006

    Posts: 10,300

    Location: Hertfordshire

    Currently training for the Brighton Marathon 2 x short runs in the week (5 miler) and long runs at the weekend 10 last Sunday, 8 the Sunday before, 6 the Sunday before that, trying to keep under 8.45 min per mile to get a sub 4 hours :D

    Got a stinker of a cold so not run this week! I'm gutted :(
     
  18. jsmoke

    Soldato

    Joined: Jun 17, 2012

    Posts: 7,063

    Why do you feel tired and dead and other times full of life and energetic. Is it food/diet, sleep, psychological, or what is it. This morning feel like death, ok sleep, no alcohol for days, and had a good breakfast etc.
     
  19. iMacMart

    Capodecina

    Joined: Jun 8, 2006

    Posts: 10,300

    Location: Hertfordshire

    What distance are you running? I find a morning run with porridge chopped banana and honey, black coffee and I’m good for 10 miles + but some nights after work I feel rubbish!
     
  20. jsmoke

    Soldato

    Joined: Jun 17, 2012

    Posts: 7,063

    So why do you think that is, must be a chemical thing?