1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

** So let's talk about Cinavia DRM Copy protection **

Discussion in 'Home Cinema & Hi-Fi' started by jaybee, Apr 12, 2012.

  1. jaybee

    Mobster

    Joined: Jul 10, 2008

    Posts: 4,823

    There don't seem to be many online discussions on Cinavia DRM so I thought I would start one here.
    First of all for those that don't know what it is:

    From Wikipedia, the overview:

    Overview

    Cinavia works to prevent copying via the detection of a watermark recorded into the analog audio of media such as theatrical films and Blu-ray discs. Note that the intent is to prevent all copying, both pirate copies and legal copies of one's own content, for example, for format shifting.

    The watermark is able to survive recording through microphones (such as recording a film in a movie theater with a camcorder), as well as compression and encoding, yet still be imperceptible to human hearing. Verance claims that the presence of the watermark does not affect audio quality.[2]

    When media with the watermark is played back on a system with Cinavia detection, its firmware will detect the watermark and check that the device on which it is being played is authorized for that watermark. If the device is not authorized (such as not being an authorized movie projector in the case of a cam bootleg, or not utilizing AACS in the case of a copy of a commercial Blu-ray disc or CSS in the case of a copy of a commercial DVD), a message is displayed (either immediately or after a set duration) stating that the media is not authorized for playback on the device and that users should visit the Cinavia web page for more information. Depending on the device and firmware, once the message is triggered, the audio may be muted, or playback may stop entirely.[3]


    The full wikipedia article is HERE for reference.


    So basically it's a modern day DRM technology that is so far unhackable. It has an audio watermark that will survive any transfer.


    So why should I care if I'm not a pirate?

    Because if like a lot of people these days you decide you want to rip any of your DVDs/Blurays into an electronic format (such as the popular .mkv container) for storage on say your computer/NAS/Server, this will affect you.

    What will happen if I try to rip my own legit copies of my DVDs/Blurays?

    Nothing will happen. They will still rip ok. But....

    What will happen when I try to play my ripped/transfered legit DVDs/Blurays?

    As above in the wiki article you can read more, but essentially, after usually around 10-20 minutes unto the movie, the audio will be muted and/or playback stopped entirely with a Cinavia DRM copy protection message.

    Will this affect ALL my DVD's/Blurays?

    No, cinavia has only affected CERTAIN titles:

    "As of February 2012, the vast majority of Blu-ray releases with Cinavia have come from Sony Pictures Home Entertainment. However, there have been Cinavia Blu-ray releases from Warner Home Video (The Losers), 20th Century Fox Home Entertainment (Dylan Dog: Dead of Night), and Universal Studios Home Entertainment (Larry Crowne, The Thing)."

    For the full list of affected titles so far you can go to the wiki article above. But just on the bluray format in 2010 there were 7 affected titles, in 2011 there were 16 and in 2012 there are currently 22 affected titles.


    What devices are Cinavia DRM enabled and will cause me problems when watching my legit ripped movies?

    Again for a full list read the above article, but it is mainly Sony and Samsung Bluray players, and the PS3 (Playstation 3).


    Can I not avoid it somehow?

    No. It's here to stay on devices that decide to run with it. But you can chose to run with a device that does not have it, or devices on older firmware that do not have it enabled, for example the PS3 pre 3.10 firmware (or custom firmware).

    Will it get more widespread?

    This is already happening.


    Are media players Cinavia free?

    Most are yes. Check the list.

    Are HTPCs affected?

    No.



    Overall I feel that this DRM is likely to be the most successful yet and may not be broken. There have been workarounds discovered but they are by no means perfect and do not totally eradicate it, i.e. there will be some compromise. I am not aware of it being properly avoided/hacked yet. The PS3 can run custom firmware that avoids it, but this is because the underlying OS and Cinavia related files are removed/modified since the PS3 got opened up last year with full hypervisor access etc. For most hardware running Cinavia, it will be a case of living with it.

    It's a shame for users that genuinely own the physical media and want to enjoy it via a NAS/server etc. A lot of people do not seem to be aware of it as have not experienced it yet.

    Perhaps this will push more and more people away from PS3 ownership and onto HTPCs and Media players without Cinavia.


    Thoughts and discussion welcome.


    Poll also welcome:
    Have you experienced Cinavia?
    1: yes
    2: no
     
  2. LizardKing

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Oct 18, 2002

    Posts: 7,526

    Location: The Land of Roundabouts

    Unless Cinavia get implemented in every single device capable of playing media i dont see how this can have any impact?
     
  3. realBabelfish

    Mobster

    Joined: Oct 23, 2002

    Posts: 3,106

    all this will do is make people avoid players with the software built in.
     
  4. DiCe!

    Soldato

    Joined: Sep 1, 2007

    Posts: 5,416

    As said, This will only hurt the people running with it.

    Am I wrong in thinking they are just clarifying the laws on changing format for media? Why do that and then at the same time bring this in?
     
  5. Vonhelmet

    Caporegime

    Joined: Jun 28, 2005

    Posts: 48,116

    Location: On the hoods

    It sounds technically implausible. Either it's imperceptible or it can survive compression. It's unlikely it can do both.

    All it will take is for someone to learn how the algorithm works and what it's adding, and then find a way to negate it. If it can be added by a computer, then it can be removed by a computer.
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2012
  6. FrankJH

    Capodecina

    Joined: Jun 6, 2005

    Posts: 22,194

    I cant access wiki from work -but I would expect a complete disc copy to still work at the very least , yes its a pain but imo with the likes of ipad's etc etc watching /listening to things on the go is never going to go away and companies concerend are usually those selling the hardware in the first place

    (ie sony selling the discs, as well as tablets etc)
     
  7. jaybee

    Mobster

    Joined: Jul 10, 2008

    Posts: 4,823

    Sorry I do not understand what you are saying? What is technically implausible? Cinavia is in effect today.
     
  8. jaybee

    Mobster

    Joined: Jul 10, 2008

    Posts: 4,823

    Define "disc copy" ?
     
  9. lord filbuster

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Jul 7, 2007

    Posts: 1,322

    I believe the point he was making is that if it is inaudible, the compression algorithm should remove it, as it does with most sounds higher than the human threshold of hearing. I'd have thought simply dropping the sampling frequency would deal with it, since the higher frequencies would no longer be represented accurately.

    I suspect it works in a similar way to those music recognition programs, the hashing method they use is ridiculously robust against all sorts of noise and compression artifacts.

    Unfortunately a complete disc copy isn't possible at the moment, since some information regarding the encryption is written very close to the centre of the disc, and only licensed pressing machines can replicate it, not home burners
     
  10. jaybee

    Mobster

    Joined: Jul 10, 2008

    Posts: 4,823

    Interesting. I was also thinking this. If the sounds are in audible to human ears, they must be outside of the audio range we care about on the movie and hence can be "filtered". I would have thought that there is surely more to it than that. Perhaps portions of it drop down into lower frequencies sometimes as well. It's surely been designed that in order to circumvent it, complete degredation of the audio would be apparent to the point where it is unuseable.


    EDIT: Complete wiki article pasted for those that cannot view it on work lines etc:












    Cinavia


    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    Jump to: navigation, search







    This article may require cleanup to meet Wikipedia's quality standards. (Consider using more specific cleanup instructions.) Please help improve this article if you can. The talk page may contain suggestions. (March 2012)


    Cinavia







    Type

    Digital rights management



    Owner

    Verance



    Introduced

    2010



    Website

    http://www.cinavia.com


    Cinavia is a digital watermarking and steganography system under development by Verance since 1999, and released in 2010. In conjunction with the existing Advanced Access Content System (AACS) digital rights management (DRM) inclusion of Cinavia watermarking detection support became mandatory for all consumer Blu-ray players from 2012.

    The watermarking and steganography facility provided by Cinavia is designed to stay within the audio signal and to survive all common forms of audio transfer, including lossy data compression using discrete cosine transform, MP3, DTS, or Ogg Vorbis. It is designed to survive digital and analogue sound recording and reproduction via microphones, direct audio connections and broadcasting, and does so by using audio frequencies within the hearing range. It is monaural and not a multichannel codec.

    Cinavia's in-band signaling introduces intentional spread spectrum phase distortion in the frequency domain of each individual audio channel separately, giving a per-channel digital signal that can yield up to 20 kilobits per second—depending on the quantization level available, and the desired trade-off between the required robustness and acceptable levels of psychoacoustic visibility. It is intended to survive analogue distortions such as the wow and flutter and amplitude modulation from magnetic tape sound recording. On playback no additional audio filters are used to cover up the distortions and discontinuities introduced.

    The signal survives temporal masking and sub-band coding by operating on the fundamental frequency and its subharmonic overtones, and by dealigning the phase relationship between the strongest signal and its subharmonics. Each phase discontinuity introduced by the encoder will result in a corresponding pulse of wideband white noise, so a further range of additional distortions are introduced as a noise mitigation strategy to compensate. The desired hidden digital data signal is combined in the distortion step using a pre-determined pseudorandom binary sequence for audio frame synchronization and large amounts of forward error correction for the hidden data to be embedded. The watermark is only embedded when certain signal-to-noise ratio thresholds are met and is not available as a continuous signal—the signal must be monitored for a period of time before the embedded data can be detected and recovered. Extraction of the hidden signal is not exact but is based on recovering the convolutional codes through statistical cross-correlation.

    The Blu-ray implementation of Cinavia is designed to cover two use-cases; The first is the provision of a Cinavia watermark on all movie theater soundtracks released via film distribution networks. The second use-case is for the provision of a Cinavia watermark on all Blu-ray releases that points to the presence of an accompanying AACS key. If a "theatrical release" watermark is detected in a consumer Blu-ray audio track, the accompanying video is deemed to have been sourced from a "cam" recording. If the "AACS watermark" is present in the audio tracks, but no accompanying and matching AACS key is found on the disc, then it is deemed to have been a "rip" made by copying to a second blank Blu-ray disc.

    As of March 2012 known hardware players which can detect Cinavia watermarks include the PlayStation 3 (began with v3.10 System Software), as well as newer Blu-ray players. Cinavia is not detected in a DTS audio stream on PS3 (Must have Optical Out (S/PDIF) or HDMI, w/DTS receiver).[1] The normal action is to mute the audio output after a period of time, if a watermark is detected that does not match up with the distribution mechanism.





    Contents
    [hide] 1 Overview
    2 Technical aspects
    3 List of known devices and players that contain Cinavia protection
    4 Blu-ray players/media players that do not contain Cinavia
    5 History
    6 List of known releases with Cinavia watermarking 6.1 BD
    6.2 HDTV Or TV
    6.3 DVD
    6.4 DVD - Screener
    6.5 DVD - Region 5
    6.6 Workprint
    6.7 Digital Distribution Copy
    6.8 Pay Per View
    6.9 Telecine
    6.10 Telesync or Cam

    7 References
    8 External links


    [edit] Overview

    Cinavia works to prevent copying via the detection of a watermark recorded into the analog audio of media such as theatrical films and Blu-ray discs. Note that the intent is to prevent all copying, both pirate copies and legal copies of one's own content, for example, for format shifting.

    The watermark is able to survive recording through microphones (such as recording a film in a movie theater with a camcorder), as well as compression and encoding, yet still be imperceptible to human hearing. Verance claims that the presence of the watermark does not affect audio quality.[2]

    When media with the watermark is played back on a system with Cinavia detection, its firmware will detect the watermark and check that the device on which it is being played is authorized for that watermark. If the device is not authorized (such as not being an authorized movie projector in the case of a cam bootleg, or not utilizing AACS in the case of a copy of a commercial Blu-ray disc or CSS in the case of a copy of a commercial DVD), a message is displayed (either immediately or after a set duration) stating that the media is not authorized for playback on the device and that users should visit the Cinavia web page for more information. Depending on the device and firmware, once the message is triggered, the audio may be muted, or playback may stop entirely.[3]

    [edit] Technical aspects

    One channel of audio is sufficient to detect the mark: As stated above, the watermark would be able to survive re-recording through a microphone. Verance claims that "Verance audio watermarks can survive typical distortions introduced during the production, duplication, distribution, broadcast, and consumer handling of recorded content"[4] this should include down mixing as well. Also in the white paper for their "DVD-Audio Detector Compliance Verification Suite" all tests are single channel files.[5]

    Furthermore, the system "enables different copies of identical works to be distinguished".[4] This would enable to track an (illegal) copy of a work back to its origin (traitor tracing).

    The data throughput for a watermarking system used for DVD-Audio is described as follows "Watermark Output: 3 water-mark data bits per 15 seconds (2 CCI bits and 1 SDMI Trigger Bit)".[6] Also in the Compliance Verification Suite the lowest sample rate test is at 16k samples/s with 16 bits per sample.[5] This could indicate that the bandwidth requirements top out at 8 kHz.

    [edit] List of known devices and players that contain Cinavia protection
    Sony PlayStation 3 (with firmware update version 3.10+)
    Sony BSP-S190, BDP-BX39, BDP-BX59, and BDP-S590 with firmware released later than 3/26/2012
    Sony BDP-S185 / BDP-S186 (with firmware update version M09.R.0033+)[7]
    Sony BDP-S390 (with firmware update version M11.R.0147+)
    Sony BDP-S480 / BDP-S485 / BDP-S580 / BDP-S780 (with firmware update version M07.R.0615+)[8]
    Sony BDP-SX1000 (with firmware update version F01.R.0102+)[9]
    Pioneer BDP-V6000
    Denon DBP-1611UD
    Marantz UD5005
    LG BD570 Main Ver: BD8.31.288.C Servo Ver: H80591 (H08SAN)
    LG BD550 – firmware H80591
    Samsung BD-D5100 (1019.3)
    Samsung BD-D5300
    Samsung BD-D5500
    Samsung BD-D5700
    Samsung BD-D6500 (1023)
    Samsung BD-D6900
    Samsung BD-D8900
    Samsung BD-D7000
    Samsung HT-D5300
    Samsung HT-D6759W

    [edit] Blu-ray players/media players that do not contain Cinavia
    Dynex DX-WBRDVD1 firmware PKG_DVD_3_3_022_02_DYN_14_BestBuy
    LG BD550 BD.8.31.339.C firmware, some firmwares earlier than 300.C contained cinavia
    LG BD560 BD.8.31.339.C firmware, some firmwares earlier than 300.C contained cinavia
    LG BD570 BD.8.31.339.C firmware, some firmwares earlier than 300.C contained cinavia
    NETGEAR EVA8000 media streamer, all known firmware revisions
    NETGEAR EVA9000-based media streamers (e.g.: EVA9150, EVA9110), all known firmware revisions
    Samsung BD-P1590 latest firmware v2.13 and older
    Samsung BD-C5900-XAA firmware BSP-C6900WWB-1019.1 and older
    Samsung BD-C6900 up until firmware version BSP-C6900WWB-1018.1
    Samsung BD-D6500 firmware 2011/08/05_001022 or older (newer firmware is affected)
    Samsung HT-D5550 firmware 2011/09/28_001012 or older
    Sony BDP-S300 firmware v5.30 and older (unknown if v5.40 is protected)
    Sony BDP-S301 firmware v5.30 and older (unknown if v5.40 is protected)
    Sony BDP-S350 firmware 024 and older
    Sony BDP-S360 latest firmware 007 and older
    Sony BDP-S370 firmware M03.R.315 and older
    Sony BDP-S550 latest firmware 024 and older
    Sony BDP-S560 latest firmware 007 and older
    Sony BDP-S570 firmware M04.R.624 and older
    Sony BDP-S1000ES firmware 011 and older
    Sony BDP-N460 firmware M02.R.123 and older
    Sony BDP-CX960 firmware v013 and older
    Oppo BDP-83 latest firmware and older
    Oppo BDP-93 latest firmware and older
    Panasonic DMP-BD85 - firmware v1.70 dated 2010/10/15 and older
    Panasonic DMP-BDT350 - firmware v1.73 dated November 22, 2010 and older
    Panasonic SC-BT230 firmware 1.50 and older
    Panasonic DMP-BD75 - firmware v1.50 and older
    Panasonic DMP-BDT300 - firmware 1.59 and older
    Philips BDP9600 firmware 1.53
    Pioneer BDP-51FD and BDP-05FD firmware v1.70
    Pioneer BDP-320 V3.70 firmware and older
    Western Digital WD TV HD Media Player 1st Gen - model: WDAVN00 (latest FW v1.03.01 and older)
    Western Digital WD TV HD Media Player 2nd Gen - model: WDBABF0000NBK-NESN (firmware 1.01.70 and older)
    Western Digital WD TV Live HD Media Player 1st Gen - model: WDBAAN0000NBK (latest beta Firmware v1.03.35 and older)
    Western Digital WD TV Live Plus HD Media Player 1st Gen - model: WDBABX0000NBK (latest Firmware v1.03.29 and older)
    Vizio VBR100 firmware unknown

    [edit] History

    On June 5, 2009, the licensing agreements for AACS were finalized, which were updated to make Cinavia detection on commercial Blu-ray disc players a requirement.[1]

    Cinavia was first introduced into the PlayStation 3 with the November 19, 2009 update of the system software to Version 3.10, as shown here: PlayStation 3 system software - Cinavia is detected in Mic recorded Audio, AC3, Stereo, Dolby Digital tracks, but it cannot be detected in DTS audio tracks with PS3, while streaming from a computer. As of June 2011 (Update 3.66), certain streamed video tracks enabled with Cinavia have been recognized via pc-ps3 streaming; this would be the aforementioned audio types, except DTS.

    [edit] List of known releases with Cinavia watermarking

    [edit] BD

    2010
    1.The Karate Kid
    2.The Losers
    3.The Other Guys
    4.Resident Evil: Afterlife
    5.Salt
    6.The Social Network
    7.Takers

    2011
    1.30 Minutes or Less
    2.Bad Teacher
    3.Battle: Los Angeles
    4.Colombiana
    5.Dylan Dog: Dead of Night
    6.Friends With Benefits
    7.Larry Crowne
    8.Midnight in Paris
    9.Priest
    10.The Smurfs
    11.Straw Dogs
    12.The Green Hornet
    13.The Guard
    14.The Roommate
    15.The Tourist
    16.Zookeeper

    2012
    1.Anonymous
    2.Bucky Larson: Born To Be A Star
    3.Carnage
    4.Courageous
    5.A Dangerous Method
    6.Don't Be Afraid Of The Dark
    7.Drive
    8.The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo
    9.Higher Ground
    10.The Ides Of March
    11.In the Land of Blood and Honey
    12.Jack & Jill
    13.London Boulevard
    14.Moneyball
    15.Restless
    16.Take Shelter
    17.The Rum Diary
    18.The Skin I Live In
    19.Underworld: Awakening
    20.The Vow
    21.The Thing
    22.21 Jump Street
    As of February 2012, the vast majority of Blu-ray releases with Cinavia have come from Sony Pictures Home Entertainment. However, there have been Cinavia Blu-ray releases from Warner Home Video (The Losers), 20th Century Fox Home Entertainment (Dylan Dog: Dead of Night), and Universal Studios Home Entertainment (Larry Crowne, The Thing).

    [edit] HDTV Or TV

    None as of 2011

    [edit] DVD

    2010
    1.Takers
    2.The Social Network
    3.The Tourist

    2011
    1.Bad Teacher
    2.Battle Los Angeles
    3.Dylan Dog: Dead of Night
    4.The Roommate
    5.Zookeeper

    2012
    1.The Adventures of Tintin
    2.Underworld: Awakening

    [edit] DVD - Screener

    None as of 2011

    [edit] DVD - Region 5

    2011
    1.Battle: Los Angeles
    2.Just Go With It
    3.Red Riding Hood (2011 film)
    4.Priest (2011 film)
    5.Bad Teacher
    6.Friends with Benefits (film)
    7.Zookeeper
    8.30 Minutes or Less

    [edit] Workprint

    None as of 2011

    [edit] Digital Distribution Copy

    None as of 2011

    [edit] Pay Per View

    None as of 2011

    [edit] Telecine

    None as of 2011

    [edit] Telesync or Cam

    2010
    1.The Wolfman
    2.Repo Men
    3.Scott Pilgrim vs. the World
    4.Due Date

    2011
    1.Battle: Los Angeles
    2.Just Go With It
    3.The Roommate
    4.Sucker Punch
    5.Fast Five
    6.Paul
    7.Hall Pass
    8.Red Riding Hood
    9.Priest
    10.The Hangover: Part II
    11.Bridesmaids
    12.Bad Teacher
    13.Something Borrowed
    14.Horrible Bosses
    15.Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 2
    16.Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows
    17.Zookeeper
    18.Friends With Benefits
    19.The Change-Up
    20.Final Destination 5
    21.Contagion
    22.30 Minutes or Less
    23.A Very Harold & Kumar 3D Christmas
    24.Arthur Christmas
    25.New Year's Eve

    2012
    1.Safe House
    2.Tin Tin

    [edit] References
    1.^ a b "AACS Issues Final Agreements, Enabling Commercial Deployment of Cinavia in Blu-ray Disc Players" (Press release). Verance. June 5, 2009. Retrieved October 11, 2010.
    2.^ "Verance Technology". Retrieved October 11, 2010.
    3.^ "Cinavia Technology". Retrieved 26 May 2011.
    4.^ a b "Verance Technology". Retrieved 5 June 2011.
    5.^ a b "Compliance Verification Suite". Retrieved 5 June 2011.
    6.^ "Whitepaper for a Verance Audio Watermark Detector". Retrieved 5 June 2011.
    7.^ "Firmware-Updates für Sony Blu-ray-Player". Retrieved February 7, 2012.
    8.^ "Firmware updates for Sony Blu-ray player". Retrieved March 6, 2012.
    9.^ "Firmware updates for Sony Blu-ray player". Retrieved March 09, 2012.
     
  11. Mr Plow

    Gangster

    Joined: Aug 29, 2007

    Posts: 399

    Location: Leigh-On-Sea, Essex

  12. peterattheboro

    Capodecina

    Joined: Sep 24, 2005

    Posts: 19,917

    Location: Middlesbrough

    This is why I'll be running a HTPC in my new setup. I don't even use my PC for gaming anymore so I can just stick my PC with the TV and run everything through that.
     
  13. rush_syndrome

    Gangster

    Joined: May 8, 2010

    Posts: 421

    Location: London

    A friend just pointed me to this thread. Anything that relies on firmware can be circumnavigated as stated earlier. This technology is as easily defeatable as all the others, and no doubt SlySoft will have a relatively cheap solution.. after all, they said that DVD and BlueRay would be impossible to copy.

    The technology that is more of a threat is Ultra Violet. This subscription based system works on the basis that you buy a license for the film/music/whatever that you want to use, and then the smart devices will check the license. Once approved, you can then download it, stream it, or have it sent on a physical media. The advantage to Cinavia here, is that the connection to the DRM server is highly encrypted and that hacking the 'token' will be virtually impossible. If you don't have the token, then 'it' won't start.

    My money is on Ultra Violet not Cinavia becoming mainstream.. there again, I have absolutely no doubt that it will be defeated within minutes of being defeated ;)

    Once the ability to 'go against the grain' is truly removed, people won't buy into it!
     
  14. Pish

    Gangster

    Joined: Jan 6, 2009

    Posts: 372

    does this mean my dog will gop ape-**** when I play a cinavia protected disk?
     
  15. Vonhelmet

    Caporegime

    Joined: Jun 28, 2005

    Posts: 48,116

    Location: On the hoods

    Unlikely, as it's all done within the range of human hearing.
     
  16. ZXSpectrum

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Oct 20, 2002

    Posts: 9,319

    Location: Derby

    I have come across this a few times.. Surely "If" someone has ripped a film, that they legaly own, to play from a NAS then the device say PS3 will need to check it against the server to see if it is Cinavia encoded? Then wouldnt disabling the internet be a fudge way round it?
     
  17. platypus

    Caporegime

    Joined: Jul 25, 2003

    Posts: 38,864

    Location: Rhône-Alpes+Cambridge

    The internet doesn't come into it.

    Audio watermarked tracks are only analysed by Cinavia hardware. If a cinema release soundtrack watermark is detected, it assumes a cam-rip so wont play audio. If a certain type of signal is detected (AACS) without a key, it assumes its a bluray rip and so won't play audio.

    This only affects devices with Cinavia decoding hardware. Which is why it will only hurt people with the hardware. I guess they are hoping that in 5 years time all devices will have a Cinavia chip.

    So presumably the Playstation4, future Sony TVs and BR players, etc will have a Cinavia chip.

    Interesting article here http://www.anandtech.com/show/5693/...p-worrying-and-love-blurays-selfdestruction/4 about it. Pertinently:

    So the only person affected is someone legally purchasing the film.
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2012
  18. uchuff

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Jul 30, 2003

    Posts: 2,231

    No, the PS3 would "hear" the special Cinavia data which would tell it that the movie should only be played back from a properly printed and encrypted Blu Ray, at which point the PS3 would mute the audio or something.

    I'm with those above in saying that this will get cracked / worked around.
     
  19. phil675

    Mobster

    Joined: Jan 15, 2005

    Posts: 4,363

    Location: UK

    I've had a Harry Potter cam rip stop playing about 5 minutes in because of this. I was very glad of it though because the mrs was trying to make me watch it.
     
  20. Rossi~

    Capodecina

    Joined: Nov 5, 2010

    Posts: 18,542

    There is always a way around it, just a matter of time.