1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

UHD Bluray drives for PC?

Discussion in 'Optical Storage & Writing' started by WatchTower, Jan 2, 2017.

  1. dual2max

    Gangster

    Joined: Sep 6, 2005

    Posts: 270

    Just to add my point.
    I have a Pioneer BDR-XD07 J-UHD external drive off USB-C. Plays blu-ray, dvd, cd.
    As I have a AMD Ryzen, X470 & Titan it will not play 4k discs.
    Therefore, like me, we wait.
     
  2. AWPC

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Dec 8, 2005

    Posts: 8,868

    Pointless waiting physical media is dying now Samsung pulled the plug on their 4k UHD player. Just buy an Xbox1X or change your PC to make it 4K compatible otherwise you will be left with streaming only in future. It may take a little time but give it 2 years or so 4k discs will be scarce.

    Streaming is not the future but too many people were happy to accept it so its going to be the new standard eventually.
     
  3. 4K8KW10

    Mobster

    Joined: Sep 2, 2017

    Posts: 4,867

    Physical media can't be dying because there are many, actually the larger areas on the Earth surface do not have internet coverage, or have weak internet coverage.
    I don't know what samsung are thinking - I have never liked that company... :rolleyes:
     
  4. varkanoid

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Dec 31, 2007

    Posts: 8,269

    Location: The TARDIS, Wakefield, UK

    I think its more like they never invested in furthering their 4k range. The K8500 was an early offering and the ones that came after never really improved and my K8500 is still going strong. Physical media will never die DVD is arguably still going strong and everyone said Bluray would kill it off. I imagine the 4k market in the US is not doing so well because US Streaming is very popular but it will take a lot longer than here and its mainly due to the Streaming Services sticking to the US market, eg DC Streaming is US only, HBO is US only, Disney will be US only at first. Talking mainstream consumer too not via dodgy VPN to US.
     
  5. malachi

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Jun 27, 2006

    Posts: 8,570

    Location: Earth

    Playing normal Blu-Rays is a pain in the bum so I never bothered with a 4K UHD player on my HTPC's.

    Every few Blu-Rays releases requires an software update which usually means paying for another version of Cyberlink's software or mess around trying to rip it then play.

    I use my Xbox One X or S for 4K discs as it just works.
     
  6. Martini1991

    Caporegime

    Joined: Sep 18, 2009

    Posts: 26,156

    Location: Dormanstown.

    I pay for PowerDVD Live and I've never really had any issues, hell it even works on my 21:9 these days.
     
  7. Martini1991

    Caporegime

    Joined: Sep 18, 2009

    Posts: 26,156

    Location: Dormanstown.

    Streaming has issues with how there's no "One size fits all" solution. This is getting worse due to an increase in platforms.
     
  8. malachi

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Jun 27, 2006

    Posts: 8,570

    Location: Earth

    That's the subscription based model, so you are going to get the latest version.
     
  9. Martini1991

    Caporegime

    Joined: Sep 18, 2009

    Posts: 26,156

    Location: Dormanstown.

    Yeah, that's more my point. Although frankly their should be built in support for Blu-ray on W10, just paying for the powerdvd subscription live is pretty simple with it updating etc.
    But then it's an extra cost a year some people may not want.
     
  10. AWPC

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Dec 8, 2005

    Posts: 8,868

    It is gradually dying though 4K UHD needs an active internet connection to work to update the DRM scheme every few titles. Streaming even though sub standard AFAIC quality wise is able to deliver a DVD level picture to many with weak internet connections. Hollywood seems more interested in building their own streaming platforms than investing in physical media. 4K Discs will still be here for a few more years but the writing is on the wall its going to go away forever once the mainstream can handle higher bandwidth without data caps.
     
  11. AWPC

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Dec 8, 2005

    Posts: 8,868

    The reason MS took away built in support for Bluray was the Hollywood studios wanted an MPEG2 codec licence fee for every copy of Windows 7 sold I think it was $5 or something silly. Same reason W10 does not support 4K UHD without additional software is the licensing fees for the 4K codecs Hollywood wants their cut :rolleyes:

    When its a streaming only model in years to come watch the prices skyrocket they will try to charge per each viewing stream. This happened once before in the late 1990s a disposable DIVX disc format (not the same company as the codec) which never took off with discs which only work once & require a fee to watch via a constant internet connection :eek: this is one of many reasons why the rush to a streaming only future is going to be very bad news for consumers :( buy all the physical media you can before its too late ;)
     
  12. AthlonXP1800

    Mobster

    Joined: Sep 28, 2014

    Posts: 2,552

    Location: Scotland

    No it not the Hollywood studios who wanted a MPEG2 codec licence fee for every copy of Windows 7 sold. Actually it is MPEG LA who hold MPEG2 patents wanted a MPEG2 codec $2.50 license fee for every copy of Windows 7 sold from Microsoft. All cable TV operators, Hollywood and TV studios will need to pay MPEG2 codec license fee to MPEG LA for every MPEG2 encoded DVD movie and TV transmission.

    https://www.mpegla.com/

    Found MPEG2 license fee for each unit from MPEG LA website:

    MPEG2 decoder and encoder

    Before 1 Jan 2002: $4.00
    After 1 Jan 2002: $2.50
    After 1 Jan 2010: $2.00
    After 1 Jan 2016: $0.50
    After 1 Jan 2018: $0.35

    MPEG2 Consumer products


    Before 1 Jan 2002: $6.00
    After 1 Jan 2002: $2.50
    After 1 Jan 2010: $2.00
    After 1 Jan 2016: $0.50
    After 1 Jan 2018: $0.35


    MPEG2 DVD Packaged Medium

    After 1 Jan 2010: $0.016 or $0.01 for 12 mins for less

    MPEG LA also hold EVS (Enhanced Voice Services), HEVC/H.265 codec, DASH (Dynamic adaptive streaming over HTTP), DisplayPort, ATSC, AVC/H.264, MVC, VC-1, MPEG-4 Visual, Increscent Therapeutics, MPEG2, MPEG2 Systems, 1394 and Librassay patents.

    I cant imagine how much money MPEG LA made every year from royalty fee from all patents grabbed fees from every companies and everybody too. Disgraceful.

    MPEG LA asked $0.20 for each GPU sold with DisplayPort, $25M for hardware HEVC, up to $2.50 for each GPU with hardware MPEG2, up to $3.75M for hardware MPEG4, up to $9.75M for hardware AVC/H.264 from AMD, Nvidia and Intel every year! Wow absolutely disgraceful.

    MPEG LA is asked far too much money and HEVC was the final straw, $25M maximum fee every year is outraged then Intel, Nvidia, Microsoft, Netflix, Google and others decided enough is enough and they all founded Alliance for Open Media to created AV1 codec which is free and has no royalty fee.

    I am very impressed with AV1 on Windows 10, you can get AV1 video extension from Microsoft Store and it let you watch youtube AV1 videos on Edge, latest Chrome and Firefox also has AV1 enabled. AV1 did not worked in Android Pie yet but next version Android Q will have AV1 enabled later in 2019. YouTube, Netflix and others are now in progress to convert all existed and new videos to AV1 codec to avoid paying MPEG2, AVC/H.264, MPEG4 and HEVC/H.265 royalty fee to MPEG LA.

    [​IMG]

    Ah yes I remembered DIVX.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DIVX

    I think in 2020 all All cable TV operators, Hollywood and TV studios cant wait to encode in AV1 codec with new set top hardware or new firmware updates so they will be no longer pay royalty fee to MPEG LA for used MPEG2, MPEG4 or HEVC codec since when MPEG LA was founded in 1996 and they all can finally make lots of money from AV1 codec, see every TV channels finally move to 4K resolution and new updated Ultra HD Blu-ray spec will probably use AV1 codec.