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Undervolting/cooling help

Discussion in 'Overclocking & Cooling' started by Matthew150, May 22, 2019.

  1. Matthew150

    Associate

    Joined: Apr 18, 2019

    Posts: 9

    Hello all,

    Apologies if this is the wrong forum.

    So I brought the Proteus VI laptop from PCS (I7-8750H and RTX 2070) and decided to test it out on using 3DMark FireStrike.

    I got an original score of:

    Graphics: 18,869
    Physics Score: 14,660

    However, this was seeing temperatures of 100 Degrees Celsius on the CPU.

    After asking the lovely @MiSJAH for help, I tried undervolting.

    The lowest I could go using ThrottleStop without crashing was -150.4mV.
    On a re-run of the test I got:

    Graphics: 19,924
    Physics Score: 13,469 (although other tests have been higher).

    Sadly, the temperatures are still running at 98 Degrees Celsius.

    If anyone could advise, I would greatly appreciate it!

    I have attached a screen clipping with my TS settings.
     
  2. Matthew150

    Associate

    Joined: Apr 18, 2019

    Posts: 9

    [​IMG]
     
  3. Matthew150

    Associate

    Joined: Apr 18, 2019

    Posts: 9

  4. MiSJAH

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Nov 30, 2013

    Posts: 1,300

    Location: UK

    What are your clock ratios set at for each core?

    Can you show a screen shot of HWiNFO64 opened before running the benchmark but screenshot after the bench has completed?

    Cheers.
     
  5. Matthew150

    Associate

    Joined: Apr 18, 2019

    Posts: 9

    Update: PCS took it back, found a poor paste job, re-pasted and sent it back. Now not going above 90.

    Couple of issues that it would be good to get everyone's thoughts on:

    1) Fans seem to be constantly on/loud

    When the computer is at a pretty reasonable temperature (45 degrees) the fans seem constantly on. I presumed they'd pop on/get louder as the computers load and temperatures increase, but it seems very loud for the low temperatures.

    2)

    Using ThrottleStop, it appears that the CPUs are spending 10% of their time in the C0% state (highly active state) when the computer is completely idle. However, Task Manager is reporting 99% system idle process, so it appears that there is a significant amount of activity happening that the Task Manager is unable to report.

    3) Long Term Turbo Power Limit

    Again using ThrottleStop, when stress-testing, the CPU throttle backs at <90 degrees due to the PL1, which I believe is the Long Term Turbo Power Limit kicking in. It appears my laptop has been limited to 35W instead of a more standard 45W. This results in the CPU throttling back when temperature is completely fine.
     
  6. Bluntwrapped

    Mobster

    Joined: Jun 20, 2011

    Posts: 3,140

    Location: Livingston

    General rule - only buy a gaming laptop if you absolutely need the portability. Even the top spec, well designed ones just can’t keep up with the heat generated in such a small space. If you think temps are bad now, think how much worse things will be in 6 months time when it’s full of dust. At that point hardware starts to fail as the motherboard begins to warp out of shape and heatsink/coolers detach from their seated position. The poor paste job may indeed already be because of this.

    If you can return it, I’d get rid before it really starts to drive you mad.
     
  7. ninezerofive

    Gangster

    Joined: May 20, 2019

    Posts: 260

    Location: London

    Agree, get a ultrabook and build a gaming pc for home.
     
  8. MiSJAH

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Nov 30, 2013

    Posts: 1,300

    Location: UK

    Which gaming laptop do you have that has given this experience?
     
  9. Bluntwrapped

    Mobster

    Joined: Jun 20, 2011

    Posts: 3,140

    Location: Livingston

    I used to have a Dell XPS which was great to begin with. A few months of playing WoW and using it for Uni stuff and it had deteriorated to the point of barely being usable.

    Since things are so unforgiving in terms of space, the cooling on a gaming laptop needs to be as efficient as it was on day 1 for the duration of the laptops lifetime.

    With little way to maintain it yourself without screwing up warranty this isn’t really an option for most so dead or dying laptop can be expected.
     
  10. MiSJAH

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Nov 30, 2013

    Posts: 1,300

    Location: UK

    Just so we are clear; you are saying the issue with gaming notebooks is the noise they make with the fans in such a confined form factor?
     
  11. Bluntwrapped

    Mobster

    Joined: Jun 20, 2011

    Posts: 3,140

    Location: Livingston

    No - the cooling is inadequate over extended use which is why so many develop faults and stop working.
     
  12. MiSJAH

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Nov 30, 2013

    Posts: 1,300

    Location: UK

    Oh, you're sharing your experience.

    What are the maximum operating temperatures of the CPUs? What are the tolerances?

    Much as I appreciate your opinion, if it were demonstrable maybe we would consider it relevant.