Well I fell down the custom keyboard world.

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Im thinking of getting an Epomaker keyboard with budgerigar switches as I type a lot for work and the mx keys s sometimes doesn't feel that good after a long typing session. was wanting to get an Rt100 with budgerigar switches but can't seem to find any so may have to go with the th 80 model.
Th80 is a good starter keyboard, and budgerigar switches are very light I have them in a 65% board and it took some getting used to.
 
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Budgerigars are tactile- a very different sound and feel to a linear switch. Flamingos are also fairly light/middle weight. I use both and they're both great value and don't need any further work, but try and think what type of switch you might prefer.
 
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How did you find them for typing? I was also looking at sea salt silent switches and flamingo switches
They were ok, I have not tried seat salt but flamingo are also light. My th80 which I bought off this forum came with gateron yellow which is a linear switch and my preferred weight around 50g. Really depends if you are after a tactile, linear or clicky switch, it really is a personnel preference
 
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No, although interesting use of 'Ascend' when it's commonly associated with Glorious.

Also, their website has a Keychron image being used on it, which is confusing. Are they actually legit?
 
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Looks like they are a UK company customising other brand keyboards- in this case a Wooting. If prices are OK then fine, but I don't see the point myself.
They're selling a Wooting 60HE for 370 quid... Compared to 165 from Wooting directly (with 10 for shipping).

The only difference being that they've put it in a KBDFans Tofu case with a brass weight and using different keycaps, it's a pretty hefty markup.
 
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They're selling a Wooting 60HE for 370 quid... Compared to 165 from Wooting directly (with 10 for shipping).

The only difference being that they've put it in a KBDFans Tofu case with a brass weight and using different keycaps, it's a pretty hefty markup.
Pointless then! Why pay someone else to have all the fun?!
 
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Interested in finding a new project and the dark hole that is custom keyboards is floating my boat.

I do type a lot for work purposes so keyboard would have to be dual purpose work and gaming....

I like the idea of building my own from scratch - fairly handy with that sort of stuff. Keyboard is currently a Corsair Strafe RGB with silent switches. Not sure I want super "clicky" keys.

Any pointers where to start looking - as it seems like a VERY large hole to get into!! :p :p
 
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Interested in finding a new project and the dark hole that is custom keyboards is floating my boat.

I do type a lot for work purposes so keyboard would have to be dual purpose work and gaming....

I like the idea of building my own from scratch - fairly handy with that sort of stuff. Keyboard is currently a Corsair Strafe RGB with silent switches. Not sure I want super "clicky" keys.

Any pointers where to start looking - as it seems like a VERY large hole to get into!! :p :p
It's a deep hole for sure!

If you want it quiet then either linear or silent tactile switches, do some research on switches as even linear's can have a loud clack. As for layout if you want both work and gaming see what you can compromise on. I have a 75% and miss the num pad for work (networks/automation) but it's perfect for gaming and general use.

Obviously, your budget will be down to how much you want to throw at the hobby :p
 
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It's a deep hole for sure!

If you want it quiet then either linear or silent tactile switches, do some research on switches as even linear's can have a loud clack. As for layout if you want both work and gaming see what you can compromise on. I have a 75% and miss the num pad for work (networks/automation) but it's perfect for gaming and general use.

Obviously, your budget will be down to how much you want to throw at the hobby :p

yeah - number pad is probably the one main thing I would have to make a big call on - I like the idea of a smaller keyboard but I used the number pad a lot for work as well.

Linear switches currently - Cherry whites I think on the Corsair - like the feel so would probably consider replicating that.

Will keep reading and looking at stuff for now....
 
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yeah - number pad is probably the one main thing I would have to make a big call on - I like the idea of a smaller keyboard but I used the number pad a lot for work as well.

Linear switches currently - Cherry whites I think on the Corsair - like the feel so would probably consider replicating that.

Will keep reading and looking at stuff for now....
Definitely agree with @$anch3z that the size is your starting point.

It's a really good time to get into custom keyboards, a few years ago you'd have been waiting 12+ months for a GMK keycap group buy to finish or spending a grand on a second hand Rama board.

I personally love 60% keyboards, I know it seems incredibly small when you're losing the function row, arrow keys, number pad etc. but it's something you get used to really quickly and Fn/layers are brilliant.

I'd say pick your preferred size (60,65,75, TKL, 80, full size) and then look at whether you'd like hot swap or soldered, that's basically then going to give you your starting point to know what you can go with.

From there it's then about switches - and we have so many options now.
 
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Also think about whether you can standardise on the ANSI layout. I find it really difficult as muscle memory is too strong, but if you can then it opens up so many more options in terms of boards and PCBs. Because let's face it, if you get hooked you're going to have more than one keyboard ;)
 
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Also think about whether you can standardise on the ANSI layout. I find it really difficult as muscle memory is too strong, but if you can then it opens up so many more options in terms of boards and PCBs. Because let's face it, if you get hooked you're going to have more than one keyboard ;)
Yeah, this is a great point. The sooner you sack off ISO and get used to ANSI the more options are available and you can get more 'standard' keycap sets without having to hope an ISO kit is available.
 
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