What would you say is the easiest programming language to use today?

Soldato
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I'm wondering what is the easiest language to learn for object oriented programming?

Back in the day I learned the old languages basic, python, and even cobol. But those languages were mainly text based, at least how I was taught them in college.

I'm thinking there must be way easier languages these days.

Does anyone have any suggestions on a new language I might try?
 
Soldato
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Java, where everything is a class (if you want OOP). Although in the latest version (21 I think?) they're releasing a preview feature that omits the need of that boilerplate for newbies so maybe it's getting better?

C# and Python are also good, I'd put Python ahead as it's the easiest to get started with (minimal install in terms of software and IDE, or even using online interpreters).
Only thing is it doesn't have private and protected methods and properties and is only a convention, but you can always build on it and use the knowledge and apply it in another language with a bit of reading of the differences.

I would say choose the language that will suit your purpose for what you want to make. If you're just doing it to learn, then perhaps choose the language used in a tutorial that you might find that covers OOP.

If you're looking for the easiest, then I still think Python would be the way. I'm biased because I use Python in the day job, but I do think it's the easiest to pick up and can get quite advanced if you want to as well.
 
Soldato
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Depends what you want to use it for.

To just learn OO programming? Probably C# or Java.

OO is falling out of favour a fair bit as performance and scalability is becoming more of a concern across the board.

C++ dev FYI.
 
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Depends what you’re after.

Also, if it’s to get into an industry, you can’t always go with the best option - yea Rust and Go could destroy a Java web service, but you’ll probably find more companies using Java because it’s been there forever.
 
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I'd say find a little bite size hobby/problem to solve as a project and implement your solution as a way of learning. Maybe a little web api or something?

Pluralsight is a great source for learning and following a new language.

C# is a good shout as it has a good install base and isn't going away. Though my background is .Net so i'm biased!
 
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Python for sheer ease of getting started with basically nothing more than a text editor or C# for the vast quantity of existing code, examples and documentation. All that said I got started with HTML, which can lead on to CSS and Javascript.
 
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Associate
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Use case is important as many others have stated, but so is scale!
Best for mocking up? Python
Best for integration and scalability? Probably C# at this point
Best for performance? Probably C++

My views may be a little antiquated by this point, there's probably a new language I haven't looked into thoroughly.
 

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Soldato
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As a front-end web developer drowning in the JavaScript ocean of WTF my opinion is that C# via .Net Core is probably the most useful entry point. You can create a simple microservice or full web and native applications within its eco system whilst still learning decent modern code that can be translated to other technologies when you decide a different tool set meets your needs better. Plus it's widely needed if you wish to pursue a career on the back of it.

The only note for it is to only use recent learning resources as there are out of date aspects to some guides and tutorials.

This reminds me I still want to learn .Net Core and build a microservice for a simple app I want to build.
 
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Soldato
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A front-end web developer drowning in the JavaScript ocean of WTF my opinion is that C# via .Net Core is probably the most useful entry point. You can create a simple microservice or full web and native applications within its eco system whilst still learning decent modern code that can be translated to other technologies when you decide a different tool set meets your needs better. Plus it's widely needed if you wish to pursue a career on the back of it.

The only note for it is to only use recent learning resources as there are out of date aspects to some guides and tutorials.

This reminds me I still want to learn .Net Core and build a microservice for a simple app I want to build.
We all have little projects to learn things with but can never find the time! :D
 
Caporegime
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Back in the day I learned the old languages basic, python, and even cobol. But those languages were mainly text based, at least how I was taught them in college.

I'm thinking there must be way easier languages these days.

Nope. Text based is still by far the best way to program, and Python is about as easy as general purpose programming languages get.

Visual programming has a lower barrier of entry but rapidly becomes much harder to understand than text based.
 
Man of Honour
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Honestly a lot of programming languages are unnecessarily complex and not user friendly - I miss the days of stuff like VB3 where you had a solid core of predictable commands, intuitive methods/syntax (mostly) and extensions of functionality followed some kind of standard (mostly) where if you'd used one aspect you could guess pretty well how another would work.

Python is a good place to ground yourself but probably won't be what you'd use a lot of the time.

I find it funny how many new languages/derivatives are appearing of late with good intentions but end up with all the same problems, often worse, than the issues they are trying to address like Rust.
 
Soldato
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The first language I learned at college I think was called Q Basic, on old Unix terminals. I learned Python on there too.

Looks like I need to get back focusing on Python from the replies.
 
Man of Honour
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I'm throwing something a big left field into the mix.

It's not a language I'd have ever picked up, I didn't enjoy working in it to begin with, but I've grown a huge appreciation for Delphi

It does OOP in a concise understandable way, it's easy and logical to work with, it's been around forever, more performant than C# or Java
 
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