What would you say is the easiest programming language to use today?

Soldato
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I'm throwing something a big left field into the mix.

It's not a language I'd have ever picked up, I didn't enjoy working in it to begin with, but I've grown a huge appreciation for Delphi

It does OOP in a concise understandable way, it's easy and logical to work with, it's been around forever, more performant than C# or Java
That is a blast from the past. I forgot I had learned Pascal which seems to be what Delphi is based off.

I'll give it a look.
 
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That is a blast from the past. I forgot I had learned Pascal which seems to be what Delphi is based off.

I'll give it a look.

It is, Delphi is the object oriented extension to Pascal

The Embarcadero rad studio is free for personal use

It doesn't over complicate the object oriented part of things compared to java, it's cross platform, compiled so it's fast. And depending what you're doing it also allows you to play around with pointer access of objects without delving into C

I primarily use Delphi for desktop development, then C for embedded with some assembly thrown in the mix (Currently Renesas RH850)
 
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I thought Delphi was pretty much a pure legacy language these days?
I don't think it has quite reached legacy status yet, although it certainly doesn't have the popularity these days.
While it's not a legacy code base I work with as it's still in constant new development it has been kicking around since the early 2000s
 
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I don't think it has quite reached legacy status yet, although it certainly doesn't have the popularity these days.
While it's not a legacy code base I work with as it's still in constant new development it has been kicking around since the early 2000s

That's what I meant by legacy. A dead language gets no new development, a legacy language is really only used on projects that were around when the language was a big deal. For example, people are still out there writing new Cobol code, but I don't think there's a real demand for starting new projects in it.
 
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We use Go at work.
I personally really like it and you can definitely write oop code with it.
It doesn't have too many concepts to grasp. No inheritance so you don't have to worry yourself about that one in a million where it makes sense to use.
Implicit interfaces are a game changer that really help decouple code and keep things clean and tidy.
You do have pointers and garbage collection means they're trivial to use, but they still give you more clarity about what else you might be affecting.
Plus context, channels, and goroutines make handling concurrency quite intuitive.
 
Soldato
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I'm throwing something a big left field into the mix.

It's not a language I'd have ever picked up, I didn't enjoy working in it to begin with, but I've grown a huge appreciation for Delphi

It does OOP in a concise understandable way, it's easy and logical to work with, it's been around forever, more performant than C# or Java
My first programming job used Delphi, did not like it at first buts it was really good. It’s better than .Net as its native code so does not need lots of prerequisites installed. Have applications from 10+ years ago that are still used today, and they run on all versions of Windows.
 
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Use case really important. C# is great as is java as online resources are great and the IDE's provide great assistance. As someone who switches about in many languages C#, java, kotlin, swift and a lot of python ( Django) can't say I really have a preference it really depends on the job at hand. C# ties you to windows eco system so web apps will be iis and windows driven. I have in the last few years found myself moving towards Linux servers and python for my web apps / rest API's. Anyway best of luck it's all fun.
 
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As many others have said, use case is important really. I think if you have a good idea of the general concepts of programming most languages are easy enough to pick up as it's just syntax.
 
Soldato
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I think it depends on your goal. IMO...

Career - C# (.NET)
Hobby/Fun - Python

Also, if you want to do anything even remotely involving websites, JS is an almost unavoidable requirement.
 
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I think it depends on your goal. IMO...

Career - C# (.NET)
Hobby/Fun - Python

Also, if you want to do anything even remotely involving websites, JS is an almost unavoidable requirement.
That’s oversimplified.

Python is hugely popular, especially in the data space, along with Java and Scala.

For web there’s anything from TS/JS, to Java, to Go. Some will be easier to find due to legacy projects but you’re better off finding an area of interest (web, data, system, etc.) and learning languages that are popular in that domain.
 
Soldato
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HTML, Java etc quite easy

SQL is by far the easiest language but does it even qualify as programming?

lower level languages like branches of C are harder
 
Caporegime
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Career - C# (.NET)
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This makes no sense: there are many more Python jobs out there than C# jobs.

Besides, the first language you learn isn't the one you need to stick with. Learn to program, and you can easily transfer those skills to other languages. There's a hell of a gulf between "Hello World" and paid work. Even once you get to the professional level, it's pretty easy to move between languages. Hell, just this week I picked up paid work in PHP having never done it professionally before on the basis that I'd done C++ work with that client before and they trusted my skills.
 
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HTML, Java etc quite easy

SQL is by far the easiest language but does it even qualify as programming?

lower level languages like branches of C are harder

Odd you question SQL (which is a programming language) but put down HTML which isn't a programming language.
Pretty basic stuff.
 
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Yeah SQL is a very different beast when it comes to efficiently dealing with complex or large datasets or other advanced functionality where it doesn't really come down to understanding the language but understanding approaches using methods which aren't just something you can read in a textbook.
 
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