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WiFi Faster than Ethernet?

Discussion in 'Networks & Internet Connectivity' started by killianmcc, 22 Oct 2020.

  1. killianmcc

    Associate

    Joined: 8 Mar 2016

    Posts: 15

    My WiFi is outperforming my ethernet - before I splurge to replace my router I want to confirm that it is in fact the bottleneck. I've just purchased the ethernet cable and the PC is a recent build. My router is the bog standard supplied by my ISP (Hyperoptic) but I haven't been able to find definitive proof of the ethernet speeds it outputs, I've just found info on its WiFi capabilities. My goal was to reduce latency with the ethernet cable.

    Mobo: B450 GAMING PRO CARBON MAX WIFI

    Ethernet Cable: 30m Cat 7 Ethernet Cable

    Router: Tilgin HG2381

    So what is the issue here? Dodgy ethernet cable? Poor network adapter on the mobo? Or as I expect, the router is just not up to snuff. Am I being dumb and there's potentially some PC/Router settings that I may be missing? Let me know if I can provide more info!

    Ookla Speedtest results (Mbps):

    WiFi Down: 138, Up: 210

    Wired Down: 94, Up: 94
     
  2. Semple

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 5 Mar 2010

    Posts: 9,041

    Your ISP router may only have 100Mbps ports.

    Most new kit nowadays you don't need to configure anything for the 1Gbps port to work.

    Edit: Saying that, the specs confirm the ISP router does have 1Gbps ports.

    First point of call would be to go to the router config page, and there should be somewhere that has LAN settings, check if they're set to 1Gbps or if you need to switch it to 1Gbps.
     
  3. MissChief

    Capodecina

    Joined: 17 Jul 2010

    Posts: 21,359

    An FTTP only supplier with potential speeds up to 1GB symmetrical only supplying a router with 100Mbit ,ports would be short sighted in the extreme. Have you checked the settings for the Ethernet port? Set it to auto in network settings properties.
     
  4. Armageus

    Don

    Joined: 19 May 2012

    Posts: 13,152

    Location: Spalding, Lincolnshire

    "Cat 7" and "Flat" Ethernet cable? Change it for a standard round Cat5e / Cat6 cable and retest
     
  5. Semple

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 5 Mar 2010

    Posts: 9,041

    Yeah i overlooked the FTTP part, and assumed it was probably an old router. I did check the specs after to confirm otherwise though (hence my not-so-ninja-edit).
     
  6. pepp77

    Mobster

    Joined: 13 Oct 2008

    Posts: 4,209

    Location: SE London Born and Bred

    the 94/94 figures suggest something is causing a 10/100 connection instead of 10/100/1000 connection.
     
  7. bremen1874

    Capodecina

    Joined: 20 Oct 2008

    Posts: 12,043

    That cable is nasty.

    32AWG (0.0320mm2)! Cat5e is 24AWG (0.205mm2) and Cat6 23AWG (0.258mm2).

    That cable isn't even close to having the correct conductor size.

    Hopefully, it's a typo.
     
  8. JohnStewart

    Gangster

    Joined: 17 Dec 2015

    Posts: 228

    Go to Control Panel\Network and Internet\Network Connections on your PC, and double click on your ethernet connection when connected to the router via the cable. The pop-up should tell you the speed of the network which is hopefully 1.0Gbps.

    If it's 100 Mbps, then this is the fastest speed that your ethernet port has negotiated with the router. It could also be the case that your ethernet port has been manually configured to 100Mbps.

    Start Device Manager (press windows key and type in device manager), scroll down to find Network Adapters, click on your ethernet connection and then right click and choose properties. This will open a pop-up window. Click on the advanced tab, and scroll down to Speed and Duplex, and ensure that it is set to Auto Negotiation, and not 100Mbps Full duplex.

    If this is OK, then try a shorter patch lead before you go and buy a new router. You can get decent quality 2m Cat6A patch leads for about £2 - £3, and try moving your PC next to the router and connect using the short patch lead.
     
  9. Armageus

    Don

    Joined: 19 May 2012

    Posts: 13,152

    Location: Spalding, Lincolnshire

    Even if it's connected at 1.0Gbps it doesn't mean anything - because of how crap that cable is, it could easily be causing lots of errors and subsequently causing retransmissions etc that would drop throughput.

    Get a standard Cat5e or Cat6 round cable and I imagine all issues will disappear. There is no need for Cat6A or Cat7, and flat cables should never be used as 99% of them are utter rubbish that don't meet the required standards
     
  10. JohnStewart

    Gangster

    Joined: 17 Dec 2015

    Posts: 228

    Agreed on the crap cable, especially if it's being run alongside power cables or other potential sources of interference :eek:
     
  11. killianmcc

    Associate

    Joined: 8 Mar 2016

    Posts: 15

    Whoa, you guys have been super helpful. The messages here swayed my suspicion to my cable so I tested with 3 other laptops, wired and wireless, and saw the same decrease in speed. Guess it must be the cable! I was a little suspicious that the cable would be too good to be true, moral: don't trust Amazon reviews.

    Also, I confirmed that under Ethernet Status speed is listed as 100Mbps. I could tell that was the upper limit as that was what the results were always capping out at but didn't know that was there so thanks for that tip!

    I'm gonna return this crappy cable and pick up something decent. I'll use the below tip as a guide. Any other hints as to what indicates a good cable (as it looks like 99% of Amazon purchasers don't seem to test the stuff they buy...).
     
  12. Armageus

    Don

    Joined: 19 May 2012

    Posts: 13,152

    Location: Spalding, Lincolnshire

  13. killianmcc

    Associate

    Joined: 8 Mar 2016

    Posts: 15