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9900K @ 5Ghz 1.2V guide Gigabyte Z390 Master

Discussion in 'Overclocking & Cooling' started by true_gamer, Nov 20, 2018.

  1. Colonel_Klinck

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Oct 3, 2007

    Posts: 1,091

    Location: London, UK

    Interesting. I just had a Z390 Aorus master and 9900k arrive today. mine will be a custom loop but still want to keep temps low and try and hit 5.2 if the silicon will hit it.
     
  2. Vidar

    Mobster

    Joined: Dec 18, 2008

    Posts: 3,952

    Location: Liverpool

    I do, I'm just a little worried that I may have to up the dynamic vcore up some more to get stability as I'm at +0.030. I am a complete novice with all this and although I get the chips are tough etc I obviously want to get the temps down as low as possible.

    Do you think it would have any benefit going push/pull with the radiator mounted up top? Just a friend mentioned the 3 high speed silent wings 3's don't have the pest static pressure and I do have 3 spare pure wings 3's that I swapped out on the rad when I got it.
     
  3. Vidar

    Mobster

    Joined: Dec 18, 2008

    Posts: 3,952

    Location: Liverpool

    Euuuuurghhhh just had to add another +0.005 to the Dynamic Vcore, been solid for days and then blue screened on ebay! Doh!

    Event viewer shows a kernel power error.
     
  4. Plec

    Capodecina

    Joined: Apr 19, 2003

    Posts: 12,571

    Yep, your addicted/afflicted - whichever you want to call it.

    You'll be setting up your custom loop before then end of the year :D
     
  5. Vidar

    Mobster

    Joined: Dec 18, 2008

    Posts: 3,952

    Location: Liverpool

    Lol yeah! It's funny cause I can already see how this is going to play out... So I'll get the basics for a cpu loop, with an extra rad (for future proofing) I'll think I can make it look prettier with angled fittings, I'll track down a water block for my Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1080Ti Gaming OC BLACK. I'll want some RGB, maybe some dye to change the look of the loop. Oh and lets not forget custom sleeved cables to go with my new PSU. Then when it's done, it'll be hard line then maybe even glass while I try to push 5.1 or maybe even 5.2 lol and so on and so on.
     
  6. Colonel_Klinck

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Oct 3, 2007

    Posts: 1,091

    Location: London, UK

    Yep that is where I was 8 months ago. Did my first a custom loop on just my CPU in an old Coolermaster Cosmos tower, was immediately addicted and over Xmas built this lol. I've just updated from that pic with the Master and 9900k. Good job I don't have kids or they'd be living on baked beans while I feed my addiction :D

    [​IMG]
     
  7. Plec

    Capodecina

    Joined: Apr 19, 2003

    Posts: 12,571

    Look forward to your project log - sounds like you've got it mapped out completely in your head already.

    Kudos, especially considering it was your second ever custom loop.
     
  8. Vidar

    Mobster

    Joined: Dec 18, 2008

    Posts: 3,952

    Location: Liverpool

    I'm getting there, just trying to decide whether a 420 and 280 radiator will actually fit :D

    Would have liked a mono block for the board but doesn't seem like anyone makes them. Doing a lot of reading and watching youtube videos at the moment.
     
  9. huntmx24

    Associate

    Joined: Jun 2, 2019

    Posts: 1

    I had to make a account to thank you! I have been following gigabytes guide to 5ghz and it was stable at 1.32 but it was pumping out a lot of heat! So I did your guide and had to add +.030 and I think I am stable it goes up to about 1.29 under load maybe a touch higher and the temps are so much better! In prime95 small fft it’s 5c better and in cinebench its 10c cooler after 3 runs and also has a higher cinebench score! Super happy I am hoping it is stable. More testing to come. At 5ghz I got a cinebench score of 2212 with other apps closed and cinebench set to high priority. Pretty happy with these settings. This should be more known cause it makes the 9900k way easier to control. Power output is lower and temps at about a similar voltage as a static overclock. Have you found any new tips. I have the aorus master
    I might try for 5.1 and see what it needs



     
  10. Falkentyne

    Gangster

    Joined: Apr 7, 2006

    Posts: 204

    Just so you guys are aware, the OP's settings of "cool and quiet" have nothing to do with needing a lower stable voltage during stress tests at 5 ghz. Neither do any of the power limiting options have any effect either.
    Assuming you guys are correctly monitoring VR VOUT (do not pay attention to the Vcore 1 and 2 sensors), the reason for being able to run at a lower VR VOUT than before (usually around 20 to 40mv lower) is directly from the decrease in loadline calibration. A tighter (higher) LLC, which gives less vdroop (less *sustained* voltage drop at load) has a drawback of causing higher transient undershoots and overshoots at load also, and the more current/power you pull, the larger those will be. The undershoots are what wind up dictating your actual minimum voltage you need at load. At a lower LLC, the undershoots are less, so your VR VOUT you see will be closer to your true minimum you need. Note that undershoots and overshoots happen in microseconds and cannot be registered on VR VOUT; you can look at buildzoid's recent oscilloscope loadline video as well as Elmor's recent posts on the OCN Z370/Z390 thread to see what they look like.

    The Internal Load Line preset of "Power Saving" simply sets the AC and DC values to 0.4 mOhms and 1.3 mOhms. The DC loadline is only used for power reporting via VID (does not affect actual CPU supply voltage), e.g. VID * Amps=CPU Package Power.
    AC Loadline is the CPU Supply voltage, which uses a baseline of the CPU's default VID (at a certain multiplier, which stops scaling at the highest 2 core turbo ratio), and then is biased boosted up by the AC Loadline mOhms resistance value. This does not affect overshoots or undershoots and has nothing to do with "Loadline calibration." This total biased setting is then sent to the VRM as the "target voltage", and then that target voltage is then dropped via vdroop based on the Loadline Calibration setting.

    You can see the original target voltage via VID, if you set DC loadline manually to 0.01 mOhms (Value 1). This will remove "VID" droop from VID and show the VRM value. VR VOUT will show the value after VRM Vdroop is applied (Loadline calibration).

    Note that very few CPU's will be stable with zero offsets with Auto/Normal vcore and an AC Loadline of 0.4 mOhms at 5 ghz, and LLC set to low. This requires a very good CPU sample. And is almost guaranteed to fail prime95 small FFT (29.8 build 3-5) with AVX.
     
  11. SmashBrown

    Associate

    Joined: Jan 14, 2013

    Posts: 75

    Then how the hell do we get a stable adaptive voltage OC...
    Christ i've been doing this all week and no matter what, as soon as I pop open P95... I get a failure eventually.
    TBH I'm thinking I'll just be using realbench and cinebench from now on, I won't ever be stressing my cpu as much as p95 does and it is beggining to feel like a pointless endevour.