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BT Infinity & FTTx Discussion

Discussion in 'Networks & Internet Connectivity' started by michellez, 8 Feb 2011.

  1. robj20

    Capodecina

    Joined: 9 Apr 2007

    Posts: 10,936

    Same here, the whole estate where we live is mostly pensioners yet were always among the first on the country for anything new.
    Walking down the street the other day im still the only one out of 8 poles to have FTTP.
     
  2. hooj

    Hitman

    Joined: 2 Jan 2003

    Posts: 552

    Location: Southampton

    My FTTP install today failed. Apparently the span between the two poles they were planning on using is 90m far in excess of the 68m max span. Openreach guy said that an extra pole would need to be out up but wouldn't give any timeframes. I'd have expected this to be checked out before they showed up.

    Has anyone come across this issue? What's the average time to get a pole erected? It will be on council land, but not sure if that will be an advantage or a hinderence.
     
  3. MissChief

    Capodecina

    Joined: 17 Jul 2010

    Posts: 21,327

    Probably an advantage as Openreach deal with the council all the time. If it was private land wayleaves and a Permission To Work form would need to be completed which could have taken months to get.
     
  4. Caged

    Capodecina

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 24,471

    I'd imagine to put a pole up on public land Openreach just need to inform the council that they are going to do it, and to tell them how they are going to manage the road closure if required. It should happen pretty quickly.
     
  5. MissChief

    Capodecina

    Joined: 17 Jul 2010

    Posts: 21,327

    It’s not informing the council, it’s asking for permission. And it depends on where the pole is. @hooj is the pole on the pavement? Will any traffic lights be needed or even road closure to do it? These will exponentially add time to the work being completed.
     
  6. hooj

    Hitman

    Joined: 2 Jan 2003

    Posts: 552

    Location: Southampton

    It's not right on the pavement (set back 3 or 4 metres) but I would think they would need to be careful when erecting the pole.
     
  7. MissChief

    Capodecina

    Joined: 17 Jul 2010

    Posts: 21,327

    Might get away with temporary lights for one day. With luck you might have the pole in before Christmas. Check one http://one.network for anything planned close to you.
     
  8. Caged

    Capodecina

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 24,471

    I wouldn't bet on Christmas to be honest, treat it as a nice surprise if it goes in before the new year
     
  9. hooj

    Hitman

    Joined: 2 Jan 2003

    Posts: 552

    Location: Southampton

    Yeah I've resigned myself to it not being here before the new year. Very frustrating but hopefully should be pretty quick once the pole is up.
     
  10. Terrier_Jimlad

    Mobster

    Joined: 4 Nov 2006

    Posts: 2,735

    Location: Yorkshire

    I have G.Fast, been super reliable and consistently good for the first month and half. OR needs to visit to change your master socket, provide a G.Fast capable modem if you've gone with TalkTalk or EE (BT and Sky have it built in to their router) and then to fiddle in the cab to put your line on the higher frequency stuff (the smaller G.Fast pod attached to the side of the local street cab).

    Mine was an absolute legend and moved my master socket to the other side of the house too as it was in a rubbish position. I run a MT992 modem connected to a USG, all good so far!
     
  11. Ozymandias

    Hitman

    Joined: 14 Nov 2002

    Posts: 670

    Location: West Midlands

    Just had my Sky FTTP installed (Huawei ONT). 149 / 31 according to Speedtest. The Openreach guys were very keen to minimise any internal works due to Covid.
     
  12. Tom_ed1987

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 1 Mar 2004

    Posts: 1,727

    Location: Warwickshire

    Same. My g.fast synced at 150 & has stayed there solid. No drops, no slowdown, low pings. Very happy with it.
     
  13. Destination

    Capodecina

    Joined: 31 May 2009

    Posts: 20,837

    Mine failed also. It would seem in Ni they try to run from the cab or manhole directly into the property, instead of the little box outside, and depending on how well the builder has linked things up depends if they can rod directly in.

    They couldn't. So a different team has to come out and dig up outside the house, break into the existing conduit, then route it into the house. Shame, would have liked things to have got sorted today, no ETA on team 2 as yet.
     
  14. Terrier_Jimlad

    Mobster

    Joined: 4 Nov 2006

    Posts: 2,735

    Location: Yorkshire

    My estimated speed is around 230Mbps if I went on the higher package but I opted for the 150, not sure the extra 80Mpbs justifies the extra £10 a month, but after the complete nightmare I had with VM in the village before I moved down the road, it's nice just to be on a quality and decent connection
     
  15. jamief

    Soldato

    Joined: 23 Sep 2005

    Posts: 5,425

    Location: Dundee

    I'm on EE G.Fast 145, and currently synced at 162.
     
  16. Uncle_Gravy

    Mobster

    Joined: 11 Aug 2012

    Posts: 4,412

    Location: S.E Wales

    What's the go to upgrade over the homehub 5? It's currently connected to a HG612, but in my current war with wires i want to tidy up and simplify.
     
  17. Caged

    Capodecina

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 24,471

    The Home Hub 5 has a VDSL modem built in so you don't need the Huawei box.

    If you want something new and you're happy with the features offered by the Home Hub 5 then get a BT Business Smart Hub off eBay for <£30 and enjoy the option to set your own DNS servers.
     
  18. Uncle_Gravy

    Mobster

    Joined: 11 Aug 2012

    Posts: 4,412

    Location: S.E Wales

    So the reason I got a HG612 1. Was to see ages ago what my actual obtainable speed was and 2. Reliability, I've gone through 4 HH5 which bricked themselves, at the time I simply believe it did not have what it takes to be both a modem and a router, since then my current set up has been rocksolid for years.

    Plus I've always thought the general consensus was the hardware provided by ISPs were usually guff that scratched the bare minimum.
     
    Last edited: 18 Dec 2020
  19. Avalon

    Soldato

    Joined: 29 Dec 2002

    Posts: 6,749

    The HH5 was generally considered to be one of the better ISP supplied routers for general use. The current curve ball offering would likely be the cheap WiFi 6 Huawei AX3, it’s £40ish delivered, higher end would fall into Unifi UDM territory and the middle ground of AIO’s is just a mess. ASUS suck as a company, Linksys suck at patching security issues/LTS, DLink ... well let’s just move on, I’d probably be looking at something that runs a WRT derivative.
     
  20. Gigabit

    Mobster

    Joined: 9 Apr 2012

    Posts: 12,010

    Which version of the Home Hub 5 is it? They can actually run OpenWrt depending on model if you're prepared to do some hacking.

    Model also matters as one type is better with Huawei cabinets than the other, think it's Type B?