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Cooking with Jonny69: baking bread.

Discussion in 'La Cuisine' started by Jonny69, Apr 8, 2010.

  1. jpaul

    Soldato

    Joined: Mar 1, 2010

    Posts: 6,403

    trial run worked out - using ~110ml fluid from a fromage blanc, 1/2tsp salt+bicarb, 80g wholewheat,150g white
    no taste of bicarb, also put a damp cloth on it as it was cooling, to keep crust soft.

    compared to regular sourdough, it is perhaps, a more honest taste of the underlying wheat,
    if any lasts, I'm sure it will be good for toast too, dense bread that absorbs butter always is.
    (bakewell tart done too.)


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  2. Tone1979

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Mar 5, 2012

    Posts: 1,126

    I use half organic wholemeal from Waitrose and half strong Canadian white.

    Makes a nice loaf :)
     
  3. jpaul

    Soldato

    Joined: Mar 1, 2010

    Posts: 6,403

    Listened to food programme on R4

    the book costs the earth £350 !

    worth listening too - what I learned
    - benefit of adding a few drops of fresh pineapple juice / kiwi juice / or Vitamin C into the dough apparently improves texture
    - Do not need to knead dough can just mix and leave for 7 hours / overnight


    - moreover he said favourite recipe is sourdough with chocolate and cherries - I thought I would need to spend £350, but found an alternative source
    https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1018955-chocolate-cherry-sourdough-bread

    pictures look dam good

    [​IMG]
     
  4. jpaul

    Soldato

    Joined: Mar 1, 2010

    Posts: 6,403

    rhetorical question - but I'll use it as an excuse to revive the definitive thread


    I did learn I can buy a new mother... need a hareem

     
  5. Merlin5

    Capodecina

    Joined: Aug 17, 2009

    Posts: 13,705

    Location: Finchley Central, London

    I bought a 2lb loaf tin and made some bread tonight and I'm quite impressed, it's come out better than my fast no knead effort a few weeks ago. The crust is crispy and bread is really soft and fluffy and tastes good. I was eating a slice still warm.

    I must say though, I really struggled with the stickiness of the dough and trying to knead it. I almost gave up. I didn't want to add too much flour to the work surface because apparently that can make the bread tough. And another tip was wet the surface with water instead of flour and keep wetting your hands when it gets sticky. But I found that was making the dough too wet and stickier. Then when I placed it in the tin and let it rise for another hour I tried to cut some diagonal lines but I couldn't as it was starting to tear the dough. So never succeeded in getting the dough dry or firm enough.

    Anyway, I'm pleased with the result as I fully expected it to bomb.

    I used a 3:1 ratio of flour, 375g strong stone ground wholemeal & 125g strong white flour
    2 tspn salt. Mixed these dry ingredients.
    1.5 tspn fast yeast (about 5g) into a jug with 400g luke warm water. I also added a sprinkle of sugar, probably not needed. My infrared gun thermometer came in handy here as I wanted 40c for the water. Sat it for 10 minutes.
    Threw yeast into the dry ingredients, added 1 tbspn olive oil and mixed it up with the handle end of a long wooden spoon.
    Kneaded for about 10 minutes and proved for an hour to double size. Then kneaded for a couple of minutes, back in bowl covered and rested for 5 minutes. Knocked air out of it, rolled it and into tin to prove for another hour. Actually, there was too much dough made and it filled my tin higher than it should so I only proved second time for about half an hour as I didn't want it to rise any further before baking or it might end up toppling on itself or looking like a mushroom.
    Dusted the top with flour.
    Preheated fan oven to 190c and heated roasting tin on bottom shelf. Poured boiling water into it and put loaf in oven for 35 minutes.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


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    Last edited: Mar 14, 2019
  6. jpaul

    Soldato

    Joined: Mar 1, 2010

    Posts: 6,403

    looks good, with a high percentage of (whose? ) wholemeal, its got a nice open texture.
    you didn't try the dutch oven for it though ?

    Did you attempt to razor / cut it to help blooming .. I do, even if using bread machine.?
     
  7. Merlin5

    Capodecina

    Joined: Aug 17, 2009

    Posts: 13,705

    Location: Finchley Central, London

    jpaul, Tesco's own flour, and same for the strong white
    https://www.tesco.com/groceries/en-GB/products/254917926

    Nope, no dutch oven this time, I bought a £2 2lb tin :D
    If by razor it you mean cutting lines into the top, yeah I tried but the dough wasn't firm enough and when I tried to cut, it pulled and tore at it so I left it.
     
  8. jpaul

    Soldato

    Joined: Mar 1, 2010

    Posts: 6,403

    use a knife atm ... but per his recommendation
     
  9. famas

    Mobster

    Joined: Dec 12, 2004

    Posts: 2,934

    Location: the south

    Yeah you need a super sharp razor blade. Also wetting the blade with water can help it from sticking.
     
  10. Merlin5

    Capodecina

    Joined: Aug 17, 2009

    Posts: 13,705

    Location: Finchley Central, London

    Well I had a small amount of dough left over which has been proving all last night and today. I've been kneading and flouring it and I still can barely make slits in it, even with a razor blade. It just pulls and deforms the surrounding dough when trying to slice it. It's odd because the bread I baked yesterday is superb texture, so it's as though everything is as it should be, yet I can't make it firm enough to make cuts in the top. This is the best I've managed just now with the remaining dough, it's going to be a loaf for midgets.

    [​IMG]
     
  11. jpaul

    Soldato

    Joined: Mar 1, 2010

    Posts: 6,403

    I usually do flat-breads/naans with 'left-over' dough.

    .. that may be over-proved -
    usually, if the dough doesn't stick to my finger when I poke it, it will take a knife .. I cut it probably 1/2" deep with a carving knife;
    without a handle, like famas showed I couldn't do that holding a razer blade ... couldn't get the momentum/speed
     
  12. Merlin5

    Capodecina

    Joined: Aug 17, 2009

    Posts: 13,705

    Location: Finchley Central, London

    Flat bread sounds like a good idea. I bet mine is overproved, lol, but I'm not fussed, I have my main loaf and this extra dough has been good to practise on. But basically, I can't run any blade cleanly across it. I just watched this video too about better technique for kneading.

     
  13. famas

    Mobster

    Joined: Dec 12, 2004

    Posts: 2,934

    Location: the south

    A dough that has not been shaped well will be difficult to score as the outer layer will be sticky.

    you need to form tension on the outside of the dough in the shaping process. Doing this well will improve your rise as the gasses will find it hard to escape and it makes it easy to score.
     
  14. Merlin5

    Capodecina

    Joined: Aug 17, 2009

    Posts: 13,705

    Location: Finchley Central, London

    Do you mean shaping it after the kneading or are you including the kneading?
     
  15. famas

    Mobster

    Joined: Dec 12, 2004

    Posts: 2,934

    Location: the south

    Shape after kneading, then turn and tuck every half hour to build the gluten structure even more. Then shape and prove before baking.
     
  16. rickjames

    Mobster

    Joined: Oct 27, 2011

    Posts: 2,911

    Location: London

    Currently making a bloomer or two every week; follow Paul Hollywood's recipe which normally comes out pretty good

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