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Hiking, backpacking, trekking, mountaineering...

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Col_M, Jan 4, 2013.

  1. Street

    Soldato

    Joined: Jan 17, 2005

    Posts: 7,174

    Location: Liverpool

    I've used them loads since they used to be Bergfreunde, never had a problem and returns have been hassle free. I recently bought a new helmet from them as they were cheaper than anywhere else.
     
  2. ShiWarrior

    Capodecina

    Joined: Oct 20, 2002

    Posts: 17,734

    Location: Oxon

    thanks :)
     
  3. Street

    Soldato

    Joined: Jan 17, 2005

    Posts: 7,174

    Location: Liverpool

    I've been out playing in the Alps for the last few days. The plan is some easy trekking routes with the missus this week then next week I can get out and do some proper climbing. I was up to the Bossons glacier on Monday, Montenvers and the Midi Plan on Tuesday and up to Mont Vorassay today. Next week I'm heading up to the Conscrits hut to get a couple mountaineering routes done, hopefully Mont Tondu as an acclimatisation peak then the Domes de Miage Traverse on Wednesday. Rest day on Thursday with some climbing on the Aiguille Rouge then head up to the Midi Station on Friday to do the Pointes Lachenal Traverse and Cosmiques Arete!

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    Nice view of the Domes de Miage Traverse today from lower down, hopefully the conditions are as good next week!
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  4. ShiWarrior

    Capodecina

    Joined: Oct 20, 2002

    Posts: 17,734

    Location: Oxon

    Sport Pursuit are having a big HH sale
    just ordered 4 tops for myself
    upto 60% off
     
  5. ShiWarrior

    Capodecina

    Joined: Oct 20, 2002

    Posts: 17,734

    Location: Oxon

    question for the ones that know,

    Getting a little confused on which material is best for different seasons

    I thought I knew, but upon searching for what to wear in this heat, took me to a different answer which i thought was incorect



    So, the question i need to ask is, what material is best against your skin in different conditions and temperatures ?


    if i was to go outdoors in 30 degrees and (walking or running your still going to sweat) What would you wear ?

    If it is cooler and dry what would you wear ?

    If its cooler with possibility of raining , what would you wear ?

    Cold temps ?

    Extreme Winter/snow conditions (uk worst) ?

    EDIT //

    for the UPPER BODY
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2018
  6. matt100

    Capodecina

    Joined: Jul 31, 2004

    Posts: 11,126

    Location: Salisbury

    I have several pairs of under armour boxerjocks for walking again to avoid the whole chafing thing.

    I was walking a couple of weeks ago in 25+ and they're great for it, nothing moves or rubs if you catch my drift.

    Same for the cold, just because it's cold outside you still work up a load of heat, sweat and friction, same situation applies.

    Then pretty much anything whicking for the top.. screwed this up last time and took cotton tshirts in the heat that ended up completely soaked. Again, even when cold you'll sweat, especially with any physical activity. Then it's all about layers.

    Trousers are my issue, I've got an old pair of army surplus combat pants, I could do better but I like drawstring bottoms and I've found them surprisingly hard to replace.
     
  7. ShiWarrior

    Capodecina

    Joined: Oct 20, 2002

    Posts: 17,734

    Location: Oxon

    im ok for underwear, its more of the upper body i was referring to
    thanks
     
  8. Vargas

    Mobster

    Joined: Apr 15, 2012

    Posts: 4,772

    Location: Aonach Dubh

    Nice, sounds wonderful. Haven’t been away this year. Done plenty in Glencoe and spent a few days swimming in our not so secret deep pool in Glencoe :)
     
  9. Street

    Soldato

    Joined: Jan 17, 2005

    Posts: 7,174

    Location: Liverpool

    I usually use the same material for all seasons, I just wear less. Some sort of technical tshirt and UA boxers with shorts or thin trousers depending how cool it is. If there is a chance it'll rain I carry lightweight waterproofs. Slightly cooler conditions I'll wear a thin fleece maybe with a softshell over the top. Generally I find I don't need more than this if I'm moving even in really cold conditions. I have a synthetic insulated jacket I can put on if I do get cold and if it's winter I'll wear a long sleeve synthetic baselayer instead of a tshirt. If I'm climbing in Scottish winter I wear Goretex trousers with leggings underneath or thicker trousers and have a bombproof belay jacket for when I'm stood still.

    My gear is.. Some sort of synthetic tshirt, any running tshirt etc will do/long sleeved HH baselayer. ME Eclipse fleece, MH Super Chockstone jacket, Arcteryx Atom LT. Waterproofs, either some thin Montane one or a full weight ME one and my belay jacket is a Rab one. It's taken me a long time to get my layering system nailed on, but this lot works for me for pretty much all occasions.
     
  10. Street

    Soldato

    Joined: Jan 17, 2005

    Posts: 7,174

    Location: Liverpool

    My fun in the Alps is over.. The recent heatwave in Europe meant that there was a lot less snow and everything was very dry but we managed to get a few routes done.

    We did the traverse of the Domes de Miage and the amount of ice and rockfall definitely made things harder going. The last peak on the traverse was just a massive pile of choss too, without any snow or ice to hold things together it felt like everything we pulled on was going to come away.

    We were planning on doing the NW ridge of Mont Tondu as an easy route from the hut for acclimatisation, but it was so dry it would have been a nightmare to get up the moraine and onto the ridge. Instead we thought we'd attempt the NE ridge, as despite the ice it looked easier to get onto. We didn't even get halfway up though before the mountain decided to dump a load of rocks down the path we'd just come up and then again on the route we were intending on taking so we made the decision to bail and run away instead of playing Russian roulette in a rockfall!

    On Friday we got the first bin up to the Midi station and headed round to the Cosmiques Arete. Surprisingly for such a popular route we had most of it to ourselves! The heat had made it a totally different route to the last time I was on it and it was a pure rock route with no axes or crampons needed.

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  11. MM-Seat

    Hitman

    Joined: Nov 7, 2011

    Posts: 684

    I'd love to do some of the above in Alps. I don't think I have the time or ability to improve my skills beyond what I currently have though!
     
  12. gort

    Wise Guy

    Joined: May 27, 2003

    Posts: 1,347

    We want to rent a camper van and travel round Scotland for around 5 nights this October.
    Is this enough time to take in the likes of Galloway Forest, Skye and some of the Cairngorms? Or should I restrict it for the 5 days?
    Maybe Galloway Forest and Skye and stick along the west coast and do Cairngorms another time perhaps?
    First time to Scotland and don't want to rush it.

    Cheers!
     
  13. touch

    Capodecina

    Joined: Oct 28, 2006

    Posts: 10,993

    Location: Sufferlandria

    If you're happy enough to just see the sights as you drive along the road, you could do all of that in 5 days.
    If you want to stop and explore, do some walking and look around various castles/ruins/other POIs, then you wouldn't be able to do everything in 5 days.
     
  14. touch

    Capodecina

    Joined: Oct 28, 2006

    Posts: 10,993

    Location: Sufferlandria

    To expand on that, if it was me planning a trip to Skye, I would want to visit:
    -Fairy Pools in Glen Brittle
    -Dunvegan Castle
    -Neist Point
    -Walk in the Coulins
    -Walk around Quiraing loop
    -Walk around Portree town/harbour.
    -"The Lookout" bothy at Rubha Hunish
    -Talisker distillery
    -Eilean Donan Castle (actually on the mainland, not skye - but very close).

    That would be at least 3 days on the island but obviously the things I want to see and the amount of time I would spend at each will be different to what you want.
     
  15. gort

    Wise Guy

    Joined: May 27, 2003

    Posts: 1,347

    Forgot to say that we'd be wanting to do half or full day-hikes etc so would need to take that in to account.
    I think I'll be shortening our route then to give us time so as not to rush.

    Thanks for the list!
     
  16. Jokester

    Don

    Joined: Aug 7, 2003

    Posts: 38,352

    Location: Aberdeenshire

    Old Man of Storr is on my list of Skye things to see. Some truely remarkable scenery around that area.
     
  17. Mulder

    Mobster

    Joined: Oct 10, 2004

    Posts: 3,843

    Location: London

    I'm heading to Scotland on Monday for a few days to see some sights/hikes. Current plan is:

    Day 1 - Loch Loman and Tossachs National Park + Glen Etive
    Day 2 - Three Sisters, Glencoe + Ben Nevis (will stop at Eilean Donan Castle too)
    Day 3 - Isle of Skye - Fairy Pools, Old Man of Storr, Quiraing Portree
    Day 4 - Isle of Harris - Luskentyre beach, Traigh Niosaboist

    Welcome any thoughts on whether the schedule works or if I'm missing anything worth seeing!
     
  18. touch

    Capodecina

    Joined: Oct 28, 2006

    Posts: 10,993

    Location: Sufferlandria

    Be aware of the wild camping ban around the Loch Lomond area if you're planning on camping. There's designated areas where you can pay to camp.

    Seems like a long day if you're planning a hike at each location. You can't get near the castle outside opening hours but you do get a good view of it from the car park. If you arrive in the evening, the sun will be setting behind it and probably give some nice photos.

    Again, seems like a lot to fit into a day. The main road on Skye over the bridge and through Broadford, Portree to the ferry port at Uig is 2way traffic. Pretty much every other road is singletrack with passing places so travelling around will take longer than you'd think.
    If you're taking a car, get the ferry booked ASAP. There's been some stories in the news up here this summer of holidaymakers having booked accommodation in the western isles and turning up to find the ferry full and not being able to get over there until the next day. Although, I got the ferry over to Lewis last weekend and it didn't seem to be full. I was on my bicycle though so I dont know what the booking situation for cars was - maybe it was at weight capacity even though there was deck space for more cars?
     
  19. Mulder

    Mobster

    Joined: Oct 10, 2004

    Posts: 3,843

    Location: London

    Thanks for the thoughts touch. Have booked places to stay and the ferry, but will look at what might be droppable if it's too tight. I climbed Ben Nevis a few years ago so could drop that but part of me wants to do it again!

    Will dust off my Coolpix P600 and try and get some decent shots.