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How to repair a Dead Dell 3008WFP Monitor

Discussion in 'Monitors' started by embalse, Nov 16, 2012.

  1. embalse

    Hitman

    Joined: Jun 13, 2007

    Posts: 821

    Location: East Sussex

    I have a Dell 3008WFP vA02.

    If you wake up one morning like I did to find your monitor has no power. It is most likely because the diode D22 has blown. This is becoming a common problem with this model especially around the 4 year mark.

    The part only costs under £3 pounds to replace so here is a “step by step” of how I repaired mine. I hope this helps others as this monitor is too expensive to throw out.

    Thanks to Banano and all on this thread who helped me.

    http://forums.overclockers.co.uk/showthread.php?t=18444760

    Also thanks to those over at badcaps who have a long thread on the subject.

    http://www.badcaps.net/forum/showthread.php?t=14195


    These videos will also help, but he makes getting the bezel off easy which is not the case.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=89Z8-eYknmc&feature=relmfu

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zKvAirYSqUM


    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    You need to buy a STPS60170CT diode. You can get one from here..


    http://uk.farnell.com/stmicroelectr...e-schottky-2x30a-170v/dp/1295334?Ntt=129-5334


    The hardest part for me was removing the bezel. It is a real pain, but it does come off.

    [​IMG]


    File down an old credit card on one edge so that you can pry away the bezel then use any other suitable tool to help. I used a bicycle lever.
    When you have separated the bezel be careful because the power on/off is connected to it so do not seperate too much.

    [​IMG]


    Place some card at the edges to keep the bezel separated then turn it over. Again be careful when turning as the screen is no longer held in place.

    [​IMG]


    Once turned over you can remove the back. Gently lift over the sockets and the whole back should come off. You then need to remove the metal backplates which are secured by screw's and tape.

    [​IMG]


    Remove the power connector lead (use a paper clip to pull the two brown levers on each side then it should pop out), then remove the inverter plug.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Gently lift up the main backplate which holds the power board. There are two sockets that need to be disconnected before you can completely take it off.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Once off turn it over and you will see the power board.

    [​IMG]


    Remove the 4 screws that hold the power board at the back and the 5 screws that hold the board at the corners.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Lift it up (It might be stuck so you may need a bit of force) but be careful as it is connected by 2 sockets that need to be disconnected.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Now you have the power board separated, you need to remove the heatsink to gain access to the diode D22.

    [​IMG]


    Remove the 2 screws on the top.

    [​IMG]


    The heatsink is now connected by two corner solders and 2 diode's. These all need to de-soldered from the power board.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Warming the board first with a hair dryer before de-soldering helps a lot.

    [​IMG]


    De-soldered joints.

    [​IMG]


    Heatsink removed

    [​IMG]


    Where the heatsink was connected by the screws Dell has some kind of thermal paste. I removed this before removing the diode.

    [​IMG]


    The diode D22 is clearly marked on the board. It needs replacing with the STPS60170CT diode.

    [​IMG]


    You need to unscrew the diode from the other heatsink and de-solder it from the power board. Replace it with the new diode. Clip the ends to the right size and solder.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    The old and new diode.

    [​IMG]


    And..... you are done, well nearly.

    Not sure what the paste was on the heatsink but I used CPU thermal paste, before putting back the heat sink. Solder back the heatsink and the 2 diodes that you removed.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]



    Put back the monitor back plates etc and …. You have your monitor working again.




    Good luck.


    .
     
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2017
  2. Banano

    Associate

    Joined: Jan 20, 2009

    Posts: 76

    Nice work embalse :)
     
  3. LOAM

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Oct 20, 2004

    Posts: 9,784

    Location: Nottingham

    Very much appreciated mate, I imagine that at some point I'm going to have to do this. Part of wonders if I should just but the diode and due it now rather than wait for it to go.

    If I had any sway I'd ask for sticky.
     
  4. embalse

    Hitman

    Joined: Jun 13, 2007

    Posts: 821

    Location: East Sussex

    If it "ain't broken don't fix it".
    Hope you don't have to fix it, but if you do at least there is a solution.

    .
     
  5. fuus

    Associate

    Joined: Dec 3, 2012

    Posts: 6

    Hey Embalse, I acquired one of these monitors for next to no money at all. In the repair process I got the monitor to live for about 30 seconds but it died. Can you recommend either where I could find a new power supply? Or someone with better soldering skills than me as I'm hopeless :/
     
  6. embalse

    Hitman

    Joined: Jun 13, 2007

    Posts: 821

    Location: East Sussex

    Did you manage to replace the D22 first?

    The problem with replacing the Power Supply is that it will come with the original diode D22 which means that at some point it has a high risk of blowing again.

    It would be worth practicing soldering on some old boards before soldering the D22.
     
  7. guzmanword

    Associate

    Joined: Dec 4, 2012

    Posts: 4

    agree, The problem with replacing the Power Supply is that it will come with the original diode D22 which means that at some point it has a high risk of blowing again[​IMG]
     
  8. fuus

    Associate

    Joined: Dec 3, 2012

    Posts: 6

    I did indeed replace the D22, however it only functioned for about 30 seconds then died again.... Any idea where I might be able to pay for soldering expertise?
     
  9. embalse

    Hitman

    Joined: Jun 13, 2007

    Posts: 821

    Location: East Sussex

    Sorry to hear you had no luck replacing the diode.

    It could be that your soldering did not connect to the board properly so it is worth trying again, before looking for a new Power Supply.

    Any local computer/TV repair place should have a person who can solder if you feel you cannot try again.

    .
     
  10. fuus

    Associate

    Joined: Dec 3, 2012

    Posts: 6

    To the best of my knowledge there are no shops in the local vicinity which offer such a service! :(
     
  11. embalse

    Hitman

    Joined: Jun 13, 2007

    Posts: 821

    Location: East Sussex

    If it's any help I used a...

    WELLER - W61 EU - SOLDERING IRON, TEMP CONTROL, 60W
    DURATOOL - SOLD0001 - SOLDER WIRE, 60/40, 6M, 22SWG
    DESOLDERING BRAID (Better than Desoldering Pumps at least for me)
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2012
  12. fuus

    Associate

    Joined: Dec 3, 2012

    Posts: 6

    I used a Weller soldering iron, leaded solder and some desoldering braid also.. It's just my hand movements that are poor
     
  13. Freddie1980

    Soldato

    Joined: Sep 25, 2009

    Posts: 5,911

    Location: Billericay, UK

    How did someone find out it was that particular part that was causing the issue? Looking at it there appears to be no phyiscal damage.
     
  14. fuus

    Associate

    Joined: Dec 3, 2012

    Posts: 6

    Multimeter :)
     
  15. jamesfreddie

    Mobster

    Joined: Jul 7, 2010

    Posts: 3,579

    Just using diode test on a multimeter on the diode.

    Most monitors die from capacitor failure before anything else.

    Edit: Wow this monitor actually has good brand caps.
     
  16. Jb111s

    Associate

    Joined: Dec 4, 2012

    Posts: 1

    Great thread! I've just got one of these monitors which has an intermittent fault. The screen can work for days on end without issue, but other days just flickers constantly. I turn it off for 10 mins & it's fine for a bit then starts flickering again.

    Going to open it up this weekend & try giving it a vacuum as some say this could be caused by dust build up ?

    Anyone got any ideas ? Also going to attempt to remove the antiglare coating as well (gulp!).
     
  17. jamesfreddie

    Mobster

    Joined: Jul 7, 2010

    Posts: 3,579

    It wouldn't flicker because of dust.

    I would check the caps while you are in there.
     
  18. fuus

    Associate

    Joined: Dec 3, 2012

    Posts: 6

    Definitely check the caps! They're the most likely source of problems!
     
  19. eviltobz

    Associate

    Joined: Jan 20, 2013

    Posts: 1

    Just wanted to post a big thanks to all the guys who've figured out the cause of the problem and detailed how to go about fixing it. My beloved 3008 died a couple of weeks back, and with the help on here I was able to fix it. Cheers all :)
     
  20. MM55

    Associate

    Joined: Feb 19, 2013

    Posts: 1

    Many Thanks

    The info in this thread especially the key steps backed by photos helped me fix my 3008 WFP, which died last week.

    Many thanks to embalse for his clear explanations as well as everyone else on this thread who've helped make the task doable!!

    Cheers!
     


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