Openreach master socket and new house ethernet system

Associate
Joined
2 Dec 2020
Posts
11
Hi,

Apologies in advanced for my cluelessness in the field of networking, but I am currently in the middle on an on-going and seemingly never ending install with Plusnet and thought now would be a good time to make sure I'm utilising my internet setup correctly.

I've just moved into a new build house which appears to have cat6 cabling running through the walls to various outlets (4 in total). Firstly, is there a way I can check the type of cable being used (just out of interest, it's not critical that I know).

Secondly, Openreach recently came round to install a phone line, and the house hadn't been added to their system before. They made hard work of the install, but the end result was an Openreach Mastersocket 5c replacing one of the ethernet ports in the living room. The job they did seemed to be fairly hap-hazard: drilling the drop-line from outside through a wall and connecting it via jelly connections to the aforementioned ethernet cable. (Orange to Blue and White to Blue/White).

The reason I queried their work is because Plusnet confirmed the fibre was ready to use but when I connected the router (Plusnet Hub One) to the master socket via an ADSL filter (also provided by Plusnet), it came up with an error light saying it couldn't detect the broadband. I tested it with a second router (which they sent by mistake) and a HG612 modem (purchased to use with Nest wifi once the above is resolved).

Should Openreach installed something else in order to connect to the master socket, or is there any glaringly obvious reason as to why the broadband won't connect from the above info. (I did google how the cables should be inputted to the socket and it appears the blue and blue/white cables may have been incorrectly entered to the A / B ports but changing this didn't solve the issue so swapped them back)

And more generally, should I be looking to change any components to fully utilise the hard-wired ethernet cabling throughout the house (e.g different master socket).

Thanks in advance, and apologies for any lack of clarity - all knowledge on the topic has been gained through furious Googling.
 
Associate
Joined
2 Sep 2016
Posts
520
Doesn't sound right bt normally have the master socket connected to the cable they bring in to the house never heard of them hijacking existing cabling, why wasnt the line put in during the build?

You sure they didn't put the master socket where the line comes in and used your cat6 to make an extension to where your socket in the living room is?
 
Associate
OP
Joined
2 Dec 2020
Posts
11
Thanks for your reply.

I've taken a photo of their connection, and also a photo of how the developer left the Ethernet cables. I assume these are meant to feed into an Ethernet switch. Not sure why the line wasn't put in during the build.

dtYSQ74
Q7VSZGd


https://ibb.co/dtYSQ74
https://ibb.co/Q7VSZGd (not sure on best way to attached photos)

As suspected, Openreach's connection seems to be the issue.
 
Soldato
Joined
20 Oct 2008
Posts
12,096
Where's the master socket? It isn't pictured.

Have you tried plugging a phone into it? Is there dial tone and a nice noise-free line?

Your cables appear to have Cat5e printed in their jackets so they aren't Cat6 (not that it matters).

How do builders manage to install such **** ugly cabling? Did they even bother to label the ends?
 
Associate
OP
Joined
2 Dec 2020
Posts
11
Master socket is in the living room, I can send a photo but not much help.

But without the ethernet cables being labelled I can only assume Openreach test to check which cable to use for the relevant socket (or is that too optimistic).

I've just ordered a phone from Argos to test the phone line, so will pick it up and test this afternoon and update with progress.

Thanks again.
 
Associate
OP
Joined
2 Dec 2020
Posts
11
They didn't really give me an option.

They wanted to use one of the face plates already installed. I don't know what the best setup would be if long term I wanted to utilise the hard wired Ethernet cables in some capacity. Would it be to have the master socket close to where those Ethernet cables end in the cupboard pictured above?
 
Associate
OP
Joined
2 Dec 2020
Posts
11
Openreach - I spoke briefly to an ex BT engineer who's number I found online and he said the way they've set it up should work. And agreed with testing the phone line and confirming the number is the one Plusnet have given me.

Just waiting on Argos to confirm I can pick up the phone. Maybe it is an issue on Plusnet's end, but either way sounds like Openreach could have wired it in a better location.
 
Associate
OP
Joined
2 Dec 2020
Posts
11
Very useful to know, I can possibly request this move when Openreach come round again.

Will let you know the outcome of the phone line test later. Thanks for your help so far
 
Associate
OP
Joined
2 Dec 2020
Posts
11
Full view of the cupboard here (https://ibb.co/KhYkGSX) - no empty plug socket but not hard to install one I imagine.

Would I be able to get the master socket and the Ethernet switch in here comfortably (and is that the end goal if I want all 4 Ethernet ports in the house to work?)
 
Soldato
Joined
20 Oct 2008
Posts
12,096
Terminating the cables in that location and not supplying power is moronic.

Routers tend to have four network ports built-in so you wouldn't necessarily need a switch. Even if you do need one there looks to be plenty of room for a small switch.

Having the router in there would be good for the wired connections but probably not great for wireless.

What are the black coax cables for?
 
Associate
OP
Joined
2 Dec 2020
Posts
11
Terminating the cables in that location and not supplying power is moronic.

Haha, I'm realising that now. Never met the developer, only ever dealt with the estate agent so couldn't pick his brains on his thought process or lack thereof.

A quick check on the coax cables - there are 3 coax ports around the house and three coax endings in this cupboard so they are the endings points for those ports.

Yep, I agree on having the router in there - not ideal. Long term, I would want a solution that allows me to have a router in a sensible place (e.g living room) and the 3 other Ethernet ports working for hardwired connections but struggling to see the solution with my limited understanding of modems, splitters etc.

Short term, I just want internet from Plusnet as they promised!
 
Associate
OP
Joined
2 Dec 2020
Posts
11
What builder is responsible for that lash up?

Private developer - just built this house and the one next door. The neighbors have kindly let me use their wifi while this fiasco continues but I think they resigned themselves to just using one ethernet port and a router for the house so can't use their setup as a guide either.
 
Soldato
Joined
20 Oct 2008
Posts
12,096
Your photos earlier... how does the picture of the BT line connected to the Cat5e relate the other picture with the ends coming out of the cupboard?

Is there only one cable to the living room where you want the phone point and router?

You may have an option of running both phone and data through that single cable. It wouldn't be ideal but would allow you to have your router in the living room and have a connection back to a switch in the cupboard (and from there to the other rooms).
 
Associate
OP
Joined
2 Dec 2020
Posts
11
https://ibb.co/sm5XxGN

The cat5e they used also used to terminate in the same cupboard but they sent it into the wall space below/behind so they could link it to the drop line (coming in through an exterior wall). So originally all 4 ethernet cables came out at the same place. The opening in the wall where they've connected the two lines is indented as the access for a stopcock.

There is only one cable to the living room where the master socket is now placed.
 
Soldato
Joined
20 Oct 2008
Posts
12,096
That one cable to the living room could carry phone and data allowing you to have the master socket and a network socket next to each other. You'd only be able to get a 100 Mbps link rather than Gigabit, but that would be fast enough for a VDSL connection. Gigabit needs all four pairs in the cable, 100 Mbps only needs two pairs.

You could then have the router in the living room and be able to connect it back to the cupboard. Install a switch in the cupboard and you can connect up the other three rooms.
 
Top Bottom