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Platypus' Beginners Guide to Running

Discussion in 'Sports Arena' started by platypus, Mar 26, 2007.

  1. Shamrock

    Mobster

    Joined: Jul 24, 2003

    Posts: 4,872

    Location: floating down the Liffey

    If it ain't on Strava it didn't happen.:D
     
  2. King85

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Nov 30, 2008

    Posts: 1,882

    Location: Solihull, West Mids

    I know :'( I use endomondo though and have no friends on it so it was mostly to see if it actually was my best.

    The update on the watch added a lot of features though which was nice.
     
  3. D.P.

    Capodecina

    Joined: Oct 18, 2002

    Posts: 24,598

    My 920Xt lost GPS signal yesterday, but that was just a 5mile recovery run. More annoying was today on a 22Mile long it was acting all weird giving very slow paces but jumping really fast. Was really off-putting at the end of run when tired, I kept thinking I was crashing and running form my 8:00 pace because I had a hard time keeping 8:30 pace on the watch, then the watch started showing, 8:45,9:05,9:37 I then realized to was broken., especially when it was saying 11:00 pace when i was liekly running 7:20s.
     
  4. GSVBagpuss

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Jun 11, 2013

    Posts: 2,000

    I'm back to running (a little bit) as I'm doing a triathlon this year. Will only be a 5k run but Strava tells me I've done 1 run per year for the last 6 years! Am quite looking forward to training for speed rather than plodding endurance runs
     
  5. chris4652009

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Sep 24, 2013

    Posts: 2,090

    I run with Endomondo and Strava running at same time (phone in my running belt pocket thing)...plus Garmin tracking me on my Fenix 3hr .

    It'd annoy the hell out of me if I lost a run
     
  6. Shamrock

    Mobster

    Joined: Jul 24, 2003

    Posts: 4,872

    Location: floating down the Liffey

    Wow the bag drop facilities at the Brighton Marathon are pathetic compared to literally every other race I've done.

    If you don't have a friend/family to hold your stuff you are pretty much screwed as you may only store stuff in their provided bags which aren't big enough. :rolleyes:

    Even a single rucksack is too much. Looks like I will have to pack incredibly lightly which is tricky since I'm forced to stay over the night before due to their "we don't post race packs" policy.
     
  7. King85

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Nov 30, 2008

    Posts: 1,882

    Location: Solihull, West Mids

    Haha now that's backing up your backups for sure. It is annoying but my own fault for not updating the watch first really.
     
  8. D.P.

    Capodecina

    Joined: Oct 18, 2002

    Posts: 24,598

    Pretty standard in the US, 1 small clear plastic bag that is provided. Smaller events wont even have a drop bag facility,. Given what happened at Boston its understandable.

    You don't need much at the end. light weight jersey and somewhere to put your car keys. Put everything else back in the car. The finish should have unlimited water, sports drinks and snacks.
     
  9. chris4652009

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Sep 24, 2013

    Posts: 2,090


    Yeah I'm glad my wife is going to be with me, the drop bags are tiny.
    And Brighton must be one of the only UK Marathons that don't post out race packs! friends of mine have done a few (one of then is doing Manchester and her pack came last week) it's super annoying. I'm driving down on the Friday to get my race pack, spending Saturday resting, then driving down again V-Early race morning
     
  10. Shamrock

    Mobster

    Joined: Jul 24, 2003

    Posts: 4,872

    Location: floating down the Liffey

    Having to collect the race pack in person has meant I need to go down on the Saturday. I'm suspect of Southern Rail's service so I can't risk getting the train Sunday morning and have opted for staying overnight in an Airbnb, therefore I need at least a small rucksack of stuff.

    It's pretty poor I think considering even half marathons like Reading have decent bag drop facilities!
     
  11. BlastRadius

    Hitman

    Joined: Oct 10, 2006

    Posts: 593

    Location: Chichester

    Newbie alert.

    So I started running this year to improve my fitness for XC Mountain Biking, and I have been seduced by it. I love the feeling of being alone, it clears my mind and stymies my rage against the world.

    Looking for advice on websites, forums, kit ( especially road shoes) etc so that I can move forward. I'm 41 so not expecting to get anywhere quickly but i'm a tryer! Got my 5k time down from 28 mins to 21.50 (Parkrun) and would like to go sub 20, 10k is currently 47-ish mins but I have only gone that distance for long runs at conversational pace. Should I be looking at 10k races at this pace or wait until i'm faster? Not sure I fancy a half yet, but don't have the desire to go for a full marathon at all, maybe a seniors triathlon?
     
  12. chris4652009

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Sep 24, 2013

    Posts: 2,090

    I'm not on any running forums, however I do find the "Run for fun" FB group very helpful and informative

    btw I started this time last year at the same age as you are now. welcome aboard.
    Personally once Brighton Marathon is done I'll probably be sticking to half marathon as my weekly run, it's a nice distance
     
  13. neilw

    Gangster

    Joined: Feb 14, 2007

    Posts: 435

    The bag drop at the Great South Run is just an unsupervised hall, its not great as its probably the most expensive run I've done (£42 I think) and no £2 discount for club runners.

    Silverstone Half was really good, they send you a see through bag (Which was the only bag they accepted) you stick your race number on it, and drop it off in one of the pit garages. All organised by Army cadets, drop off and pick up al done in less than 30 seconds, pretty good for a race with 6000 people.

    I don't mind picking up a race pack on the day at smaller events run by clubs, where they are trying to keep the entry price down. But it seems crazy at a big event like Brighton run by a commercial company.
     
  14. BlastRadius

    Hitman

    Joined: Oct 10, 2006

    Posts: 593

    Location: Chichester

    Thanks, I will check it out. Trying to up the mileage slowly is difficult, done a bit too much hill work and felt the first signs of IT band becoming sore a few hours after running. Any tips for IT band strengthening other than slow it down?
     
  15. neilw

    Gangster

    Joined: Feb 14, 2007

    Posts: 435

    With a 21:50 Parkrun you should be able to go under 45 for a 10k, (Mcmillan says just over 45) My Parkrun PB is 20:03 (hillyish course) and 10km 41:27 (flat) So I'm only dropping 1:30 over the distance. I'm hoping to go under 20 at a 5km along Bournemouth sea front (flat and straight) in a few weeks.

    This tool is very useful and really accurate (for me anyway) and predicting race times based on PB's at different distances.

    https://www.mcmillanrunning.com/

    If you want to race 10k's I'd up your conversational pace 10km to 12 and then onto 16km (10mile) once your there you'll feel more confident about a half.
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2017
  16. semi-pro waster

    Don

    Joined: Sep 27, 2004

    Posts: 25,502

    Location: London

    Can you ask the Airbnb host to leave the stuff with them? It's not ideal and does mean you'd have to go back but at least you wouldn't be quite so limited with the luggage.

    In terms of trainers it's very much a personal thing, it's worth going to a shop and getting a gait analysis but you might well find that some brands of shoes fit your feet better than others. There's usually sales on last seasons trainers so it doesn't have to be hugely expensive.

    As for races it depends what you want to do and why - there's typically people from the quite speedy to the more sedate at pretty much any race you go to. I found joining a running club opened up lots more races for me and because there's a certain amount of feeling like you're in a team it can make it more enjoyable plus there are definite benefits to regular training. At 35+ you'll be in the veterans category so for many races you'll get an overall ranking against everyone and then also a position calculated against people in your age bracket.
     
  17. Shamrock

    Mobster

    Joined: Jul 24, 2003

    Posts: 4,872

    Location: floating down the Liffey

    That may be the best option.

    Checkout is technically at noon, so if I can run a 2:40:00 marathon I'd probably have time to go back before noon.:D
     
  18. D.P.

    Capodecina

    Joined: Oct 18, 2002

    Posts: 24,598


    that is normal in the US, and typically no race day pick up allowed as well. $30 to get your pack shipped to you.
     
  19. D.P.

    Capodecina

    Joined: Oct 18, 2002

    Posts: 24,598

    Race whatever you want to race really. Don't be put off by longer distances, they can be much more fun IMO and depending on your goals can be easier to succeed in and age is much less of a factor. For example, most winners of marathons are in their 40s and it is common for people in to their 60s to do well. I've never raced a 5K and have absolutely zero desire to do so, just far too short and intense and I just don't give 2 hoots about cutting a few seconds here or there. I have a 10K coming up that I intended to use as a time trial to elp set a pace for my Marathon but TBH, i don't really care enough to turn up at this stage. I hate those short distances and high intensities.
    I've had a lot of fun runnign marathons but even so i am intending to move on to ultras. There is a very different colture and game plan involved. In an ultra you are not typically racing other people but sharing an experience. You don;t care about the time but finishing. . Common to see people helping each other along the way, compared to short distance road races where there all kinds of elbows and pushing involved.

    Just a different perspective, longer distances work well for older and slower runners who want to have fun and not beat the clock by 3 seconds.
     
  20. BlastRadius

    Hitman

    Joined: Oct 10, 2006

    Posts: 593

    Location: Chichester

    Thanks for the replies, I must admit I have been caught by the parkrun experience / need to compete. In truth what I like doing is running through the local hills and forests, by myself and for myself, I have been using parkrun as a barometer of my general fitness / improvement. Think I may sign up for the Chichester (local) half marathon for experience having upped my conversational distance as mentioned. Will definitely look into Gait analysis as mentioned above, as slightly worried by IT band symptoms and not sure my Salomon Sense Mantra 3 are helping. Running club idea is interesting, always felt like a solo experience, not sure how well I would gel in a club?
     


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