Tesla Model Y

Soldato
Joined
5 Apr 2009
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22,653
They will get what they ordered or what they ordered with additional or better stuff. No one is going to be worse off. Continuous improvement is a much better model. The only potential loss is residual value can be more difficult to manage when variables are unknown.

My last Model S I bought just before they upgraded the MCU and it screwed me in terms of resale value.

"No one is going to be worse off"

"it screwed me"

:p

I can see upsides to it but I don't think the 'legacy' behaviour of defining things more rigidly is without merit - you know when updates are coming, you can understand your risks around MY changes and when to anticipate change that may impact your spec or value.

In the case of the post above, I don't know how comfortable i'd be in the situation of not knowing which battery i'll be getting and whether I might end up with the 'inferior' spec that's subsequently worth less when it's superseded within a couple of months. Admittedly not so much a worry for lease/PCPers etc. You also don't get the flexibility at purchase to negotiate with a dealer to get a better deal on a lower grade outgoing spec, so no opportunity to work it to your advantage as with a legacy manufacturer, making it somewhat less of an issue.
 
Soldato
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"No one is going to be worse off"

"it screwed me"

:p

I can see upsides to it but I don't think the 'legacy' behaviour of defining things more rigidly is without merit - you know when updates are coming, you can understand your risks around MY changes and when to anticipate change that may impact your spec or value.

In the case of the post above, I don't know how comfortable i'd be in the situation of not knowing which battery i'll be getting and whether I might end up with the 'inferior' spec that's subsequently worth less when it's superseded within a couple of months. Admittedly not so much a worry for lease/PCPers etc. You also don't get the flexibility at purchase to negotiate with a dealer to get a better deal on a lower grade outgoing spec, so no opportunity to work it to your advantage as with a legacy manufacturer, making it somewhat less of an issue.

I said no worse off except in possible resale value :)

I was more focusing on the above poster who was worried about the different battery etc.
 
Associate
Joined
2 Oct 2006
Posts
2,105
"No one is going to be worse off"

"it screwed me"

:p

I can see upsides to it but I don't think the 'legacy' behaviour of defining things more rigidly is without merit - you know when updates are coming, you can understand your risks around MY changes and when to anticipate change that may impact your spec or value.

In the case of the post above, I don't know how comfortable i'd be in the situation of not knowing which battery i'll be getting and whether I might end up with the 'inferior' spec that's subsequently worth less when it's superseded within a couple of months. Admittedly not so much a worry for lease/PCPers etc. You also don't get the flexibility at purchase to negotiate with a dealer to get a better deal on a lower grade outgoing spec, so no opportunity to work it to your advantage as with a legacy manufacturer, making it somewhat less of an issue.

What sort of differences are we taking about in terms of the 4000 series batteries vis today?

A lot of Model 3 owners have taken advantage of the high re-sale values, sold their current models and purchased inventory stock and even made a few £ in some instances. Potentially, we could do the same with the Model Y depending on the type of purchase contract (Lease/PCP).
 
Soldato
Joined
9 Mar 2003
Posts
10,580
Honestly? I don’t think a great deal to be fine with.

As Tesla are cell limited, I expect they’ll initial start deploying the new pack with a similar capacity to their current cars.

There is seemingly little advantage in increasing the size of the backs significantly even if they can with the new cell format when they can just use the additional cells to sell more cars, trucks and lorries.

The new cells are pretty much a requirement for the roaster, semi and cyber truck as far as I can tell. If they actually want to get those products to market, they can’t be filling Model Y and 3 with them or they’ll have nothing left.
 
Soldato
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As above. There's a global crisis in getting access to cells. Tesla's cars are already at the top end in terms of cell capacity, efficiency etc. They are also backlogged on orders across their entire range globally, they have no incentive to change anything, except putting in batteries from alternative suppliers etc (e.g. the LFP in the SR+). In terms of outside of batteries etc, the 3 and the Y are still relatively new and just coming out in markets, there will be no major changes for a while still.

MCU's just upgraded to AMD chips, so up to date there. Heatpumps already in etc. It's a fairly save time to buy and get good residuals.
 
Soldato
Joined
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17,109
or, jump ship ? Look in other countries where Y is released as an indication of suv competitors strengths desirability/residuals
- ID4 (can be awd & adaptive, quiter) doing well in Norway
The BEV registration results already in our database (year-to-date):
  • Tesla Model 3 - 1,968 (12,058 YTD)
  • Volkswagen ID.4 - 718 (8,645 YTD)
  • Tesla Model Y - 2,379 (8,267 YTD)
  • Ford Mustang Mach-E - 319 (6,160 YTD)
  • Audi e-tron - 324 (5,745 YTD)
 
Soldato
Joined
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Location
West Midlands
or, jump ship ? Look in other countries where Y is released as an indication of suv competitors strengths desirability/residuals
- ID4 (can be awd & adaptive, quiter) doing well in Norway
The BEV registration results already in our database (year-to-date):
  • Tesla Model 3 - 1,968 (12,058 YTD)
  • Volkswagen ID.4 - 718 (8,645 YTD)
  • Tesla Model Y - 2,379 (8,267 YTD)
  • Ford Mustang Mach-E - 319 (6,160 YTD)
  • Audi e-tron - 324 (5,745 YTD)

No offence but you need to start looking at the data better, not just copy pasta and hope for the best.

The Model Y has been available for ~3 months in Norway, and sold 400 less than the ID.4 which has been out almost a full year...
 
Soldato
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I may be a fanboy but that aside for Model 3, Model X and Model Y, none of them have anything that I would call true competition when you weigh everything up. Do some alternatives do some things better? Sure, but as a package for the price, nothing comes near. The Model S (out of what is available to buy today) is the only model with true competitors.
 
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Soldato
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10,580
The ID4 is a good car but it’s not as good as the Model Y in most key areas and comes in at a far lower price point to reflect that.

You can get in one for under £40k and top out at about £50k, Model Y starts at £55k.
 
Soldato
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I had a Q4 on NHS Fleet Solution order... or so I thought, but it turned out there was a mess up by the lease company. So I was back in the market and looked at cars that could be delivered in reasonable time frames.

Model Y
I-Pace 400
EV 6

My wife and I decided that the Model Y looked nice from the exterior but the interior was far too minimalistic for our liking. Also found the drive on our TM3 test drive to be quite fidgity and less refined than both the EV6 and I-Pace. The wind noise in the Model 3 was also noticeably louder, but not that it was unacceptable, just definately not as quiet as the I-Pace.

In the end the I-Pace interior and more premium feel, as well as the more refined and comfortable ride quality made the choice for us. I do not like the fact it is very inefficient but 180 miles in Winter and 230 summer will suit us just fine. Really when it comes down to it none of these cars were a bad choice and it is a case of win some lose some with none being outright winners in all areas.

EDIT: Just read this back and noticed it was mistakingly implied I test drove a Model Y. It was a Model 3 we test drove as the Model Y was not available. Apologies for the lack of clarity.
 
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Soldato
Joined
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I may be a fanboy but that aside for Model 3, Model X and Model Y, none of them have anything that I would call true competition when you weigh everything up. Do some alternatives do some things better? Sure, but as a package for the price, nothing comes near. The Model S (out of what is available to buy today) is the only model with true competitors.

You have contradicted yourself there. If an alternative does some things better then by definition if you prioritise those "things", then for the price, the alternative is better than the Model Y.

It's a simple concept called objectivity.
 
Soldato
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You have contradicted yourself there. If an alternative does some things better then by definition if you prioritise those "things", then for the price, the alternative is better than the Model Y.

I think he meant you might get one things or two that are better on other cars, but as a whole package the Model Y wins out, in his opinion. At least that is how I read it. :)
 
Soldato
Joined
30 Sep 2005
Posts
14,487
I had a Q4 on NHS Fleet Solution order... or so I thought, but it turned out there was a mess up by the lease company. So I was back in the market and looked at cars that could be delivered in reasonable time frames.

Model Y
I-Pace HSE EV 400
EV 6

My wife and I decided that the Model Y looked nice from the exterior but the interior was far too minimalistic for our liking. Also found the drive to be quite fidgity and less refined than both the EV6 and I-Pace. The wind noise in the Model Y was also noticeably louder, but not that it was unacceptable, just definately not as quiet as the I-Pace.

In the end the I-Pace interior and more premium feel, as well as the more refined and comfortable ride quality made the choice for us. I do not like the fact it is very inefficient but 180 miles in Winter and 230 summer will suit us just fine. Really when it comes down to it none of these cars were a bad choice and it is a case of win some lose some with none being outright winners in all areas.

Good luck getting 180 miles in winter. The i-pace is a great car no doubt, but the range is pretty lean to say the least.
 
Soldato
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Good luck getting 180 miles in winter. The i-pace is a great car no doubt, but the range is pretty lean to say the least.

I noticed that the iPace wasn't even in the top 10 BEV's sold in 2021 in the UK, but they I also noticed Jaaag had only sold 18k cars in the UK in total for 2021, the Model 3 alone sold nearly double that, pretty crazy really all things conisdered.
 
Soldato
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Belfast
Already have a colleague at work who gets 180 miles in winter with is I-Pace and 220-240 in summer.. Also confirmed on the I-Pace forum where real owners reported anything from 170miles to 200 miles winter range.
 
Soldato
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Berks / Moscow
I noticed that the iPace wasn't even in the top 10 BEV's sold in 2021 in the UK, but they I also noticed Jaaag had only sold 18k cars in the UK in total for 2021, the Model 3 alone sold nearly double that, pretty crazy really all things conisdered.
There is a world outside the U.K. too where they don’t have such incentives like 1% BIK and government grants.

Not that a model 3 is a competitor to a jaguar anyway
 
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