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Bike License

Discussion in 'Biker's Cafe' started by russell664, Oct 5, 2015.

  1. russell664

    Mobster

    Joined: Nov 19, 2011

    Posts: 4,553

    Location: Worksop

    Hi Guys,

    So I have been driving for almost two years now and really, really have that itch to get on a bike. I'm 20 years old, so cannot do anything like direct access etc...

    I think the 24 restriction is a joke personally, especially if you already have a full license for X amount of time. I know the reason for it but still //RANT

    So my question is; what step/stages would I need to do?

    I'm aware I would need to do CBT first, but am not really clued up on the rest. Would you be able to fire me some suggestions please?

    My goal for now is by mid next year be riding say a Kawasaki 250r, so for the second question, which bikes would you guys recommend? I would be using it to and from work, a bit of motorway bits, and A roads.
     
  2. TripleT

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Oct 24, 2002

    Posts: 9,398

    Location: Manchester City Centre

    I don't think the power limits are a bad thing. No matter what you think the majority of 19 or 20 year olds aren't overly responsible and the urge and easy in which you can do silly speeds in a powerful bike is massive. It's not a perfect rule as some people are fine I'm sure, but blame the statistics.

    Probably best doing your CBT first regardless as it's cheap and easy and gives you a chance to see if biking is definitely for you.

    After then you can ride a 125 for 2 years before having to redo the CBT again if you wish. Again I'd personally recommend spending some time riding a 125.

    You can then do your A2 which is basically the full training but on a restricted bike, so it's expensive. A 4 days course can be anywhere between £600 - £1000 depending on where you go. We no prior experience you'd probably need a 4 days. If you rode a 125 for a bit you'd probably not need as much but the price difference isn't massive as the bulk of the cost is the bike hire for test and the actually tests.

    Book in for your theory test before starting your A2 training.

    A2 training is two parts, exactly the same as the DAS as I said. Car park slow speed stuff and then on road riding. Both easy with the proper training.

    After you've ridden for two years (or turn 24) you can then do your DAS which is the same two tests but on a more powerful bike. That's where it gets stupid imo as you don't even use the power of the bike when training (obviously) and many cases it can be the same bike just unrestricted so there's no weight difference or anything.

    I've no idea on restricted bikes sorry. IC3 probably knows best on this as he's looking currently extensively!
     
  3. IC3

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Dec 3, 2011

    Posts: 9,229

    Yeah, the restrictions are a joke, well they aren't as there're too many idiots and natural selection would eliminate them too quickly taking innocent people with them. So even though putting everyone in 1 jar is really unfair for the people that are responsible and know their limits/capabilities. Some people just take longer to learn how to ride, under the influence of their mates and to many endorphins/testosterone is not ideal on a 100bhp+ supersport.

    But anyway, have a look on these sites, I found them pretty useful. Some bikes such as Speed Triple 70Kw edition is missing, that bike was mainly released in Germany and Spain due to their restriction laws.

    http://a2bikes.co.uk/
    and
    http://www.dft.gov.uk/motorcycle-test-vehicle-list/

    My advice is to buy and restrict a bike, restrictors kit costs anywhere from £34 up to £150 depending on the bike. But it's usually a small piece of metal which blocks the throttle movement, lots of videos on YouTube about it. Search on YouTube 'DIY A2 47BHP RESTRICTOR SUZUKI SV 650 S #2'

    Remember: You can restrict the power, but can't restrict the torque! :D You feel the missing power only in the top end and higher speeds. But V-Twin has all the torque/go in the lower/mid range, no point in redlining it (that red line would be restricted anyway with the throttle restrictor.)

    ECU restrictors are used on KTM's mainly I think, there was a rumour that Yamaha did them. But they do the good old throttle restrictor as its cheap and just works. You can take that restrictor of any time, the insurance company don't even check your bike... they just want the certificate of the restrictor. But when making a claim they'll use that against you, if your bike is not restricted at the time of the incident.

    I'll do a list later on of what bikes caught my eye, in terms of looks and performance. If you have any questions 'trust' me, I'm doing too much research on this haha. :p

    Edit

    To check specs of the bike, such as weight, power and torque you can go on http://www.motorcyclenews.com/bike-reviews/

    Hope that answers some of your questions.

    Edit2:

    Here's a full explanation of the A2 license restrictions ---> http://www.visordown.com/learners/a2-motorcycle-licence-explained/22034-2.html
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2015
  4. Craig321

    Capodecina

    Joined: May 2, 2004

    Posts: 19,971

    If you take your test now you can get your full licence through progressive access in 2 years time, so you'll have your full cat A by 23.

    If you're happy taking the test twice, then get A2 now and A at 23. If you're happy riding about on a 125 until 24, then you may as well do that (bearing in mind you would need to take another CBT in 2 years).
     
  5. IC3

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Dec 3, 2011

    Posts: 9,229

    He'll regret that decision after 2-4 months. :p
     
  6. TripleT

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Oct 24, 2002

    Posts: 9,398

    Location: Manchester City Centre

    New sv650 / gladius has an ECU restricter. My test centre had them and the guy who was doing his training at the same time as me was on a restricted bike. All it was was a cartridge type thing under the seat. Took 2mins to change over ;)
     
  7. IC3

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Dec 3, 2011

    Posts: 9,229

    I didn't look into restrictors properly, as I'm still debating what bike to get. I like supersports, not the A2 wannabes which are too small for me anyways. There was that saying 'frog on a log.' :p

    But if Gladius has that ECU restriction thing, that would be pretty cool. I would like to try the bike on a private road without it. :D I think the Honda's have them too...
     
  8. Captain

    Capodecina

    Joined: Dec 1, 2011

    Posts: 18,252

    Location:

    Yeah just like I did :( the experience is great, but the cost of a decent 125 will pay for a 600 and half towards your DAS.
     
  9. russell664

    Mobster

    Joined: Nov 19, 2011

    Posts: 4,553

    Location: Worksop

    Thanks for all of the advice guys, especially IC3.

    My Dad has an Older Yamaha Genesis 750, which I really like and want to buy off him as he will be selling it soon. But as it is a 750 (Racing engine also!) I wouldn't be able to ride it at all.

    Would I be able to get a restriction fitted to one of those to make it run at the A2 specification?

    I will get a picture of it later to show you all, needs a bit of work, but otherwise is a great runner.
     
  10. tom_e

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Dec 26, 2003

    Posts: 26,843

    Location: West mids

    As long as the stock BHP is 94 or under then it can be restricted, after a quick Google it's bang on so yes it can be restricted.
     
  11. Soootylad

    Gangster

    Joined: May 5, 2014

    Posts: 256

    Location: Staffordshire

    As somebody who was fortunate to be able to go straight from CBT to a full A licence in a couple of months (I'm 32) I do think that the restrictions imposed on you young'ns is a bit ridiculous.

    Look at it like this, if you proceed whole heartedly at 16 with every progression the system pushes you through, by the time you get on your dream bike you will have done a CBT, a theory test and no less than 6 practical tests assuming no fails!

    Don't get me wrong, I wouldn't have been the safest rider in my late teens so completely understand why some restrictions need to be in place but the current layout is plain daft.
     
  12. tom_e

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Dec 26, 2003

    Posts: 26,843

    Location: West mids

    :confused: 4 practical tests, you only have to do MOD1+2 twice.
     
  13. TallPaul_S

    Soldato

    Joined: Mar 24, 2011

    Posts: 5,779

    Location: Kent

    A1 at age 17 (I think?), A2 at 21 (19?) and A at 24. But no-one does A1 as it only lets you ride a 125 max.

    Unless doing your A1 unlocks the 2 years thing and so lets you get a full A licence at age 19? :confused:

    I'm glad I'm an old git and just had to do one lot of tests and that's it, can ride anything I want.
     
  14. Soootylad

    Gangster

    Joined: May 5, 2014

    Posts: 256

    Location: Staffordshire

    I'm including the A1 licence which you would have to do if you went through the whole system and not wanting L plates...

    CBT + Theory + A1 Mod1 & 2 + A2 Mod1 & 2 + A Mod1 & 2
     
  15. Soootylad

    Gangster

    Joined: May 5, 2014

    Posts: 256

    Location: Staffordshire

  16. tom_e

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Dec 26, 2003

    Posts: 26,843

    Location: West mids

    Ah I didn't even think of the A1 as it's basically just the CBT and lets face it no one wants to carry a pilly on a 125 anyway!
     
  17. Craig321

    Capodecina

    Joined: May 2, 2004

    Posts: 19,971

    There just isn't an easy or fair way to do it unfortunately.

    What would make more sense, from a safety point of view, is progression for everyone. Why should Mr. 24-year-old be able to go from never ridden to full A licence with a super bike within a week whereas Mr. 18-year-old who might have been riding mopeds for two years and be a better rider get completely screwed when it comes to licence and insurance? I realise they have to base it on some sort of average/statistics though.

    Then on the other hand, you could get Mr. 19-year-old who gets A2 within a week, never rides, then upgrades to A at 21. Still zero experience and still just as dangerous as just allowing a 21 year old to go straight for A?

    There will never be a good or completely fair way to do it tbh. Unless of course they made it like flying, where you need to book a certain amount of hours with an instructor, but nobody would like that and it'd be expensive for everyone.

    Then you get insurance, that's a whole other story. Why on earth should a 40+ year old with no experience and 0 bike no claims get MUCH cheaper insurance than me, whereas I sit with 4 years no claims (proof that I'm doing something right, surely :p), and still get bummed by insurance...
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2015
  18. Flack88

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Sep 22, 2011

    Posts: 1,679

    Location: Staffordshire Somewhere

    Once again the EU doing what it does best. Screwing the UK.
     
  19. IC3

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Dec 3, 2011

    Posts: 9,229

    I want 1 category for the bike, like back in the old days... dem feels...

    Here's a comparison of the same bike restricted vs unrestrcited, its an IL4. You can see how IL4's suffer on performance whilst restricted... :(
    [​IMG]
     
  20. Junglist

    Soldato

    Joined: Jun 11, 2015

    Posts: 5,367

    Location: Bristol

    Sorry to hi-jack this thread but something has been playing on my mind.

    I was talking to my Uncle a few days ago and told him I'm looking to get into motorcycling. It was going on the back of his zxr 750 many many years ago which got me liking it.

    Now my uncle is someone who lives and breathes motorcycling (not so much now as getting a bit older but still has his super-sport in the garage) but when I told him I plan on doing my CBT and buying a used 125 for a few months he literally laughed in my face.

    Once his laughing stopped he got quite serious and pretty much said. At 25 a 125 would be a colossal waste of money. He's known I've loved the Yamaha YZF-R6/R1s ever since I was double digits and told me to go straight for an R6.

    His reasoning was basically that I would outgrow a 125 in a matter of days and would already be looking at doing a full license. What's the point in spending money on something you don't really want even if it's just as a stop gap. Take the money I would've spent on a used 125 and just go straight for the DAS.

    I said I think going straight for an R6 might be a bit too much too soon. He downplayed that as well and said a bike can only ever go as fast as you make it. Be responsible on it and it's fine. Being irresponsible on a 125 is more dangerous.

    He's been riding well over 25 years and in that time has had many crashes and lost a friend. He's no novice.

    Still not sure I believe him though!