1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Bike License

Discussion in 'Biker's Cafe' started by russell664, Oct 5, 2015.

  1. russell664

    Mobster

    Joined: Nov 19, 2011

    Posts: 4,553

    Location: Worksop

    Haha, well my CBT is this Thursday! Looking forward to it :)

    I have to say, I have not got the trials bike out for a while as I needed to clean the carbs, and there appears to be a idle issue where the engine goes mad. I assume it is an intake issue which I need to look into.

    Anyway, it runs fine when rolling, or using the clutch, as it stays in the right rev range. Although juddery, I find it easy to control. I'm aware the steering lock is far less on a road bike though :p
     
  2. TallPaul_S

    Soldato

    Joined: Mar 24, 2011

    Posts: 5,779

    Location: Kent

    Ah, that's a shame it was cancelled. Good luck for Thursday! If you can ride a trials bike then the mod 1 should be simple, it's just a case of getting used to a bike which is probably 1.5x the weight.

    The key things are to look up and where you're going and the keep the revs fairly high and slip the clutch. I was dreading the figure of 8/slalom as they were the only things I was dodgy on, but I aced the Mod 1.
     
  3. russell664

    Mobster

    Joined: Nov 19, 2011

    Posts: 4,553

    Location: Worksop

    Today was interesting.. in a good way of course.

    We started with all of the briefings for the road, the procedures and the main points before getting to the bike. Once on the pad to do the CBT stuff, I thought that it would be fairly easy, but a road bike is so much harder to control than a trials bike. My main problem was not getting my head around the clutch, and how precise it was, took me a while to even move forwards controlled,without being all over the place.

    After the initial stuff we went out on the road, and did some turning into roads and the lifesavers/mirrors techniques when doing so. It was really nerve racking for me at least when we hit a 40mph stretch of road, it was like WOAH!
    I have two concerns, two of which my instructor also mentioned to me;

    1. As a car driver, I tend to be checking my mirrors too much. As in, looking around behind me, more than in front, but also moving too quickly when doing a life saver etc... I'm sure it is a nerves thing, but hopefully should even out with more experience.

    2. Confidence. At the start, it was jittery and just terrible. After about 20 mins, it was far far better, but found myself doing stupid thing, like braking far too early, or shifting gears in the wrong direction :eek: but after like 40 mins it was far better again.

    Maybe i'm setting my standards too high? Even though I did what I needed to do, didn't drop the bike, or cause any bad situations, I feel that I didn't do half as good as I could of...
     
  4. TallPaul_S

    Soldato

    Joined: Mar 24, 2011

    Posts: 5,779

    Location: Kent

    You 'passed' though right? CBT is nothing more than making sure you're safe on the road, they can't teach you much or give you hours of training. If you get a 125 of your own that's when you really learn how to ride.

    Are you going to do DAS or straight onto a 125?
     
  5. Captain

    Capodecina

    Joined: Dec 1, 2011

    Posts: 18,252

    Location:

    Do you feel confident getting onto a 600cc after today?
     
  6. russell664

    Mobster

    Joined: Nov 19, 2011

    Posts: 4,553

    Location: Worksop

    Technically, due to a few issues this morning we had about 3/4 of the day, so we are going to pick the rest up Sunday morning up until 12. But I asked my instructor if anything concerns him in regard to progress and he thinks once I have sorted this confidence thing, I will be golden. So hopefully, early morning the CBT certificate will be signed.

    Yeah I would.
    Initially I wasn't sure what to expect so was quite reserved and twitchy. No idea why, I'm quite a nervous person so probably contributed to that. But after today I feel far better about the whole thing.
     
  7. tom_e

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Dec 26, 2003

    Posts: 26,843

    Location: West mids

    Bigger bikes I find so much nicer and easier to ride than a 125 anyway.
     
  8. Junglist

    Soldato

    Joined: Jun 11, 2015

    Posts: 5,367

    Location: Bristol

    Yeah, after doing my CBT the instructor said the 125s are a lot harder to ride and told me to go sit on the Honda CB600F. It felt massive in comparison and I found it harder to believe it would be easier to ride but it actually was much easier.

    Can't wait to do my next set of training days. Though I haven't sat on one since 21st December now and it's not until 9th February :( Let's hope riding a motorcycle is like riding a bicycle in that you don't forget how!
     
  9. russell664

    Mobster

    Joined: Nov 19, 2011

    Posts: 4,553

    Location: Worksop

    I was supposed to have my MOD1 this Thursday, but when moved up to the 600cc (Yamaha xj6) I dropped it. I can't believe it, and now I don't know if I can get back on it. I really want to, but honestly I don't know. Luckly it was on a training pad, but made a stupid, stupid mistake. I was rolling, and basically panicked, as I'm quite short I can touch the floor just about with half of my foot.

    Now correct me if I'm wrong, when you stop on a bike you use both brakes, bring it to a controlled stop and the first foot to touch the floor as soon as the bike is stopped is your left foot right?

    I basically panicked and pulled the front brake, put my foot down in the process (right foot) and as it was still moving I dropped it. Now I feel awful as I broke the foot peg, but also it complely destroyed my confidence.

    Is there any advice on how not to drop it? My stopping has been touch and go on the 125, not sure which foot to use etc... Now, I'm going to make sure I always cover the back brake, and always stop the bike before touching the floor.

    Just so mad about it. I want to get back on it really bad, but just really worried about it, as it was a stupid mistake, and a very silly thing to do. :(

    I was over thinking doing simple swerves, and figure of 8's.

    Only ****ing me! :mad:
     
  10. russell664

    Mobster

    Joined: Nov 19, 2011

    Posts: 4,553

    Location: Worksop

    Going to think to myself from now of left foot, left foot, cover back brake when stopping.
     
  11. Captain

    Capodecina

    Joined: Dec 1, 2011

    Posts: 18,252

    Location:

    It should be both brakes to slow you down and then come off the front brake, using the back to control your slow speed and then either knocking it into first or neutral depending on what you want to do. My left foot is always ready to be put down when I'm doing under 5mph.
     
  12. russell664

    Mobster

    Joined: Nov 19, 2011

    Posts: 4,553

    Location: Worksop

    By ready to put down what exactly do you mean?
    Before even considering getting back on it, I want to be sure I know how to stop properly, without getting into the same situation.
     
  13. Captain

    Capodecina

    Joined: Dec 1, 2011

    Posts: 18,252

    Location:

    What I do is 1-2 seconds before the bikes comes to a stop, my foot is off the peg ready to be put down, you don't want to be stopping and then trying to put your foot down, always plan ahead. :)
     
  14. russell664

    Mobster

    Joined: Nov 19, 2011

    Posts: 4,553

    Location: Worksop

    Thanks Clovis, will be doing that from now on.

    Just so gutted. Feels like I'm back at stage 1. :(
     
  15. TallPaul_S

    Soldato

    Joined: Mar 24, 2011

    Posts: 5,779

    Location: Kent

    You probably grabbed at the front brake a little, which will stop the bike very suddenly and it'll lose it's balance. You can use both, so long as you're very smooth with the front brake, but if you're only rolling slowly, forget the front brake completely. It's for when you'tr going over 5mph only. Slow speed, under 10mph, rear brake only.

    Obviously if you're stopping from speed then you use both (more of the front) but you'd still release the front front brake as you come to a stop unless it's an emergency stop, with the right foot on the rear brake, left foot down so you're in the 'safety position'.

    Having you're left foot ready just means it's 'poised' to be taken off the peg and put on the floor. It will become second nature, but stay away from the front brake under 5mph. They should have shown you in the CBT, buy walking the bike and gradually applying the front brake, the suddenly applying it, just how quick it bites and if the bike isn't 100% upright, the forks will compress and the bike will want to lean, and fall over because you're cutting all forward motion.

    Again, if you were doing simple swerves and figure of 8's, under 5mph, don't even think about that front brake. You should be feathering the clutch, throttle to keep moving and providing resistance (note, NOT controlling your speed) with the rear brake. Once you master those 3 things combined, you'll be surprised just how slow you can ride.

     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2016
  16. Captain

    Capodecina

    Joined: Dec 1, 2011

    Posts: 18,252

    Location:

    No problem. :) it's all part of learning, once you get back on the bike you'll stop worrying about dropping it and enjoy it. :) have you spoken to the training school about getting the seat lowered?
     
  17. Junglist

    Soldato

    Joined: Jun 11, 2015

    Posts: 5,367

    Location: Bristol

    Don't be, and you aren't. You're training, it's good you make these mistakes now in a controlled environment rather than out on the road.

    I dropped my training CBF600 on the first day riding one. I was doing the same it sounds like, after some riding came up to the instructor and ended up grabbing the front brake. I now just think of that as the 'falling off at slow speed' lever.
     
  18. tom_e

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Dec 26, 2003

    Posts: 26,843

    Location: West mids

    You'll be fine once you get back on, first time out on the road on a 600 I got serious target fixation and ran a blind corner so wide I was square in the opposite lane with a people carrier coming towards me.

    Funnily enough I've never done it again, same when I first dropped my 125 on the road coming into a corner too fast panicked snatched the front brake and down I went and again I've not snatched the front brake since.

    You learn from your mistakes, don't dwell on it and get straight back on don't give the "fear" time to build and eat away at you.
     
  19. NooBish AbbZ

    Mobster

    Joined: Mar 21, 2013

    Posts: 2,790

    Location: Fareham, Portsmouth

    To the guy who dropped the bike on a lesson, don't worry, I did the same on my Mod 1 prep lesson! :D :D :D
     
  20. russell664

    Mobster

    Joined: Nov 19, 2011

    Posts: 4,553

    Location: Worksop

    Thanks JunglistE, after thinking about it I do feel much better about it now, and it is good to know that it isn't only me who has done it.

    You don't realise how heavy they are until you can't stop it coming over. The bike was a Yamaha XJ6.

    I used to do a lot of dirt jumping, free style stuff, and have crashed and hurt things many times but always managed to get back on the bike, I know it is different in the respect that it is a push bike, but the fact that I got back on it without worry, and only wariness is good.

    This felt a little different as it was unexpected, and frankly I never thought it would happen. I do feel better about it, I am going on this Thursday to do my MOD 1 as a mock test on the 125, to get a hang of the stopping properly I hope to crack it and make it second nature before getting on the XJ6 again, so it doesn't happen again.
    We are riding to Nottingham so 40 miles each way. So should give me plenty of time to get a firm grasp on how I should stop. I know it should already be at that stage, but for some reason i'm not, and that is what worries me.

    I have spoken to my dad in the meantime, and he said exactly what you said. Don;t dwell on it, and get back on it and learn from it. I will be doing that, and I'm looking forward to getting out again, and this time I'll be a little more prepared. :)

    I will speak to them and see what they say, it was odd, because it I sit close to the tank I can reach the floor not problems at all, but I find that the jewels get a bit squashed!

    Glad it wasn't only me!
    Just need to get back on the bike, and take it from there.

    On the plus side, I got my CBT certificate, and my instructor said that it was well deserved, even after dropping the bike. He said that I have come on in leaps and bounds since I started. I'm not afraid to open the throttle on the 125 like before, which is a sign for the better, as I feel a little more confident.
    Bear in mind this is after I dropped the 600. I did have a couple of bad stops, which if I was on the 600 I would of dropped it again, it is was down to using the front brake again, and not using both brakes, and using the back brake to come to a final stop, once the bike is stopped then put my left foot down, after getting the bike into first gear.